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This archive file is a work in progress on Filamentous Algae (FA) identification, control methods and ideas as your algae control toolbox.

Quote
Originally posted by ewest:
From Aquaplant:

Filamentous algae are single algae cells that form long visible chains, threads, or filaments. These filaments intertwine forming a mat that resembles wet wool. Filamentous algae starts growing along the bottom in shallow water or attached to structures in the water (like rocks or other aquatic plants). Often filamentous algae floats to the surface forming large mats, which are commonly referred to as "Pond scums." There are many species of filamentous algae and often more than one species will be present at the same time in the pond.

[Linked Image from i74.photobucket.com]

[Linked Image from i74.photobucket.com]

Magnified FA

[Linked Image from i74.photobucket.com]
Some pics of FA on the surface:
[Linked Image from bestcarnivorousplants.com]
[Linked Image from virtualviz.com]
[Linked Image from pca.state.mn.us]

Bill Cody Notes:
The Basics - Ponds each day tend to naturally collect nutrients and continually recycle them. The rate at which ponds collect nutrients is dependent on where and how the pond is built.

Nutrients grow plants as nature's way of doing things. Keeping a pond clean of weeds/algae is very similar to keeping the same size area of bare dirt as weed free. A very difficult on going project.

There are various tools to keep the "weeds" to a minimum in both ponds and bare dirt areas.

Your 'newish' pond seems to have quite a bit of filamentous algae and very likely some underwater growth. Chemicals can be a quick way to TEMPORARILY reduce the weeds. Nature will always want to have weeds-plants return to 'feed on' and utilize the nutrients. I tend to minimally use chemical algae control because the pond ecosystem has to "process" all the harsh chemicals that are applied to the pond. Most chemicals not only act on the intended target problem but also affect other sensitive living things in the pond biology. ALSO what happens to those chemicals that are continually dumped into a pond with basically no 'flusher' drain??. Chemical fate is an important part of our environment.

I currently like the algae & small weed natural control of using tilapia. They will actively eat a lot of algae and more delicate weeds. Each fish eats around twice or more of its weight a day in algae. Thus the more algae you have the more tilapia one needs. Suggested starting rate is around 30 lbs per acre. Tilapia will convert the weeds to fish biomass plus some manure. Ideally you want the manure to feed a phytoplankton (micro-plant) bloom instead of more visible problematic weeds. As often noted a few grass carp (GC) will help eat the submerged weeds, however they do not relish or favor filamentous algae. Larger rooted shoreline and submerged plants directly compete with most types of filamentous and micro-algae.

See this link for an example of good naturally balanced pond (RAH Indiana) with minimal algae control problems. Plants compete against plants for nutrients and growing space. NOTE - It is very, very hard to get natural plants established in a pond that has grass carp(GC) stocked in it. GC eat lots of newly introduced plants. Consider that potential problem before stocking GC.
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Main=39487&Number=514344#Post514344

See this link for dealing with phosphorus in ponds and how it contributes to over abundant plants both algae and rooted plants.
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthre...d=14&Number=528661&what=showflat

Last edited by Bill Cody; 12/08/20 09:19 PM.

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 Quote:
Originally posted by ewest:
Bruce it (waternet) is a type of FA.

Welcome JHM to the PB forum. Some additional info may help us all to give input. What part of the country are you in and what are your soil/water conditions?
Here is a link on FA including water net and one on FA from TAMU.

http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/guide/2algae.html

http://aquaplant.tamu.edu/database/algae/filamentous_algae_mgmt.htm

And look at this PB post for a possible idea if your conditions warrant. But be careful if you decide to try it.

http://www.pondboss.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=14;t=000228;p=1#000000



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Tilapia, where available and legal to stock, are probably far and way the best biological control for FA. Grass Carp rarely if ever have much impact on FA. These two species and filamentous algae - FA are discussed in many threads on the forum; read about Bruce Condello's tremendously overstocked GC (zero FA eaten) experience here.

Goldens Shiners appear to have some filamentous algae FA controlling ability, at least when present in large numbers. Read about filamentous algae FA and GSH in my pond here.

Last edited by Bill Cody; 01/21/13 10:17 PM.

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I just KNEW Bill Cody had posted some great info on (chemical) control of filamentous algae FA, and I found it in this thread.

The piece de resistance of the thread is this information & link-filled post which I will quote in its entirety:

Quote
Originally posted by Bill Cody:
fins, Read the topics about dealing with filamentous algae.

Cutrine & CuSO4
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=67028

Copper Sulfate vs CutrinePlus
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=34563

Copper Sulfate Buildup Discussion Thread
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=552672&#Post552672

Copper Sulfate Fate in the Sediments and Copper use Concerns
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=269325&page=1

Copper is not legal in some places and some bacterial and enzyme alternatives
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=38655&page=1

More Copper Talk and Cutrine-Plus Good Discussion
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=334884

Fish Dying Was It Copper Sulfate or Oxygen Loss
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=180003

Grass Carp Dying Was it Copper Sulfate Used For Algae?
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=35565

Copper and Grass Carp(CG)
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=552675&#Post552675

FA Problem Using Copper and Alternatives
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=548108

Dealing with NUTRIENTS that cause excess algae
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=530996

Info discussion about carp and Koi not eating algae
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=262112

Copper Sulfate or Cutrine for Chara
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=288470
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=265250
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=133933

Copper sulfate and Water Meal
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=472099

Eating Fish From Copper Sulfate Use Pond
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=410594

FA problem Responses from TractorByNet
https://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/threads/pond-identity-crisis-please-help-pics.165938/

Oregon State Univ
http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/archive/cuso4tech.html

https://www3.epa.gov/pesticides/chem_search/ppls/046923-00004-20170830.pdf
ALGAE CONTROL from COMMERCIAL LABEL, Old Bridge Chemicals, Inc - When using Copper Sulfate crystals and buffered versions (pentahydrate) to control algae, there are many factors to consider such as water hardness, temperature of the water, type and quantity of vegetation to be controlled and the amount of water flow. Algae can be controlled more easily and effectively if treatment with Copper Sulfate is [b]made soon after algae growth has started.
Under such circumstances, small amounts of Copper Sulfate can effectively control algae in water. However, if treatment is delayed until large amounts of algae are present larger quantities of Copper Sulfate will be required. Control of algae in water systems is not always permanent. Usually algae is more difficult to control with Copper Sulfate when water temperatures are low. The dose rates for Copper Sulfate are based on a water temperature of 60 º F or higher. Larger amounts of Copper Sulfate will be required in hard water because the copper binds with then water hardness (ions).

https://dnr.wi.gov/lakes/plants/factsheets/CopperFactsheet.pdf
Impacts on Fish and Other Aquatic Organisms Copper sulfate is rarely used in Wisconsin, in part due to its high toxicity to invertebrates (water fleas, crustaceans, mollusks, mayflies, snails, and crayfish) and multiple species of fish (trout, bluegill and minnow) at typical application concentrations.

The chelated forms of copper have different toxicology profiles from each other and from copper sulfate. The chelated copper products can also be toxic to fish at application rates, particularly to trout and bluegill in soft water (CaCO3 <50ppm). Applications to harder water provide a greater margin of safety to fish.
Many of the chelated copper products are also toxic to invertebrates at application rates. High concentrations of copper in lake sediment can be toxic to invertebrates that live on the lake bottom, as well. These invertebrates including zooplankton are an important source of fish food. Copper does temporarily accumulate in fish, but more in the gills and the liver than in muscle tissue. The copper in fish tissues are reduced once the copper level in the water is reduced.
Treating Algae Blooms with Copper Sulfate

Commonly used copper sulfate is toxic to most aquatic species. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), copper is toxic to fish through binding to the gill membranes. By damaging the membranes, copper interferes with osmoregulation processes. The study of five Minnesota lakes reported that, after 50 years of copper sulfate treatment, lakes were “almost completely devoid” of benthic macroinvertebrates.
https://atsinnovawatertreatment.com/blog/avoid-copper-sulfate-water-treatment/

Algae both filamentous and harmful planktonic forms are the most common, and annoying, problems faced by water treatment plants and wastewater treatment plants. It’s a problem that requires swift action to ensure that it does not affect production or harmful species that can release toxins that could change the properties of the water. To combat this problem, many believe that applying a copper sulfate solution to the infected water will reduce and cure algae blooms. While this method has been widely used and promulgated, it is an ineffective and dangerous solution to a safely treatable problem.

Here are ten reasons not to use copper sulfate as a solution to your algae bloom infestation.
https://www.lgsonic.com/chemical-dosing-contributes-to-hab-occurrence-research-finds/
10 Reasons
1. It doesn’t treat the causes of algae in your pond. When it is applied to an infected water location it can treat only the visible symptoms of algae. Instead of targeting the nutrients that cause the algae to grow in the first place, it only targets algae itself. For this reason, copper sulfate becomes ineffective—it kills the algae, which then sinks to the bottom of the pond where it decays and releases additional toxins which can create more blooms, essentially resulting in a larger problem than you started with.
2. It is or can be toxic to humans. When used to combat algae blooms in water, copper sulfate can create a hazard to humans. Since copper sulfate is easily absorbed through the skin, those that dispense it must be extremely cautious to avoid even minimal skin contact with it. If contact occurs, it can cause itching and permanent yellow discoloration of the skin. Additionally, if ingested (through inhalation of the powder or through drinking it) copper sulfate can cause immediate vomiting, and if retained in the stomach: unconsciousness, burning pain, nausea, diarrhea, headache, shock, and unconsciousness. These risks are documented by the EPA who have classified copper sulfate as a class 1-highly toxic chemical, which requires a poison warning displayed on all labels. Ultimately, copper sulfate is an unnecessary risk to those who dispense it. The potential damage to human health far outweighs the benefits of curing an algae bloom.
3. It is more likely to contribute to rebound blooms. It quickly sinks once applied to water, which causes it to accumulate as a heavy metal precipitate. This accumulation of copper sulfate and the decaying algae leads to the release of toxins and can result in the accumulated mass to resurface or “rebound” to levels similar, or higher, than the original bloom. It also accelerates the recycling of phosphorus which can promote algae blooms as well. Thus, using copper sulfate will create more work in the end.
4. It does not biodegrade. As stated above, copper sulfate accumulates as a heavy metal precipitate once it is applied to water. Because of this, it does not biodegrade. A buildup of copper sulfate can lead to a sterile water bottom, which can decrease and kill beneficial bacteria. It is not natural and cannot be removed without the assistance of other chemicals or treatments.
5. It is detrimental to plant and aquatic life. The accumulation of copper sulfate after application can create a sterile water bottom where important nutrients and bacteria that fish and other aquatic life need are killed off. Copper sulfate can weaken the aquatic food chain by killing off weaker fish who need the nutrients to survive, this leads to overpopulation of some species for short periods of time (until they die off because they are without a food source). It also creates over-oxygenated water which can also cause plants to die. Lastly, animals that drink from this water may be at increased risk of injury or death.
6. Its buildup is expensive to dispose of. Once a buildup of copper sulfate occurs, it may be considered hazardous waste. When disposal is required, this hazardous waste status can make it more expense to get rid of, due to requiring professional cleanup.
7. It can make water runoff or outflow hazardous. Copper sulfate is known to build up once used, and can cause runoff water to become potentially hazardous to those who encounter it. Water that has been contaminated with copper sulfate can be harmful to crops, animals, and people. For this reason, copper sulfate is an unnecessary danger.
8. City and state officials are concerned about the safety of copper sulfate use. Concerns about the effects of copper sulfate on human and animal health have considerably changed the views of state legislatures and cities about its use. Ultimately, states want a solution that will provide them with more positives than negatives, and it will not do that.
9. It is highly corrosive. Another issue with copper sulfate is that it is highly corrosive to steel, iron, and galvanized pipes. It cannot be stored in metal containers and must only come in contact with stainless steel, Monel, or plastic. Copper sulfate’s corrosive nature makes it incompatible with cost-effective methods for storage and thus becomes more of a nuisance to use than a benefit.
10. There are better solutions. See Below
Animal and Human Health hazards from extended or high copper exposure.
https://rais.ornl.gov/tox/profiles/copper.html


Results
General
Good FA Advice links
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=222061#Post222061
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=528573

Manual and Lengthy Discussion of Treatment Alternatives plus Homemade Algae Rake
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=528559&page=all

Build an algae Skimmer Rope
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=508045

TX new pond with FA discussion
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=262078

Algae as Chara Problem
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=267948#Post267948

Owner with FA needs tilapia
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=291915

Aquashade
http://www.pondboss.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=20;t=001307#000005 [/b]


You have to get up pretty early in the morning to try and top Dr. Perca!

More discussion about using pond dye.
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=461648&page=1

There are new machines that produce sonic wavelengths are being sold to control algae - Do your Homework.


Cody aka Dr Perca offers one additional filamentous algae FA control method that has been discussed on the forum - quick lime (calcium hydroxide, hydrated lime). Note this is primarily for small patches of FA and not to be used as whole pond treatments. Maybe someone can add a link that locates those discussions.

Here are discussions of how to best use Cutrine liquid and granular for FA control.
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=413182#Post413182
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=455029#Post455029

Last edited by Bill Cody; 10/11/22 08:40 AM.

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Controlling Filamentous Algae with dye.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ewest addition

Try these on dye, filamentous algae FA and plankton as the base of the food chain - start with 2nd , 3rd and 4th then the archive last.

http://www.pondboss.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=92633#Post92633 FA archive

http://www.pondboss.com/forums/ubbthread...ite_id=1#import dye as a control method

http://www.pondboss.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=34878&fpart=1 dye - how it works and its effect on the food chain

http://www.pondboss.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Board=14&Number=34602 FA and dye discussion


Last edited by Bill Cody; 01/21/13 10:19 PM.

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Note: These photos (by cory, from what is this ) have been tentatively identified by Bill Cody as being Blue-Green "Gelatinous" filamentous algae FA. See Bill's text below:

Quote:
Originally posted by Bill Cody:
It doesn't appear to be the typical filamentous algae that most pondowners have. From your description and since it looks like there is a good amount of gelatinous texture to it, it it could be one of the filamentous bluegreen algae such as Nostoc or Nodularia or possibly a species of Anabaena that forms gelatinous "globs". For a positive identification it needs to be examined with a microscope by someone familiar with algae. The gelatinous nature will likely make it difficult to kill with chemicals because the chemicals will have a difficult time penetrating the gelatinous coating.







Last edited by Bill Cody; 01/21/13 10:19 PM.

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Chip Rowland's late Winter filamentous algae FA:
Originally Posted By: Chip Rowland
Hi Pondmeisters,

The ice is leaving here in NW Ohio but I already have a good growth of FA around the edges where the ice is open.






Last edited by Bill Cody; 01/21/13 10:20 PM.

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Chip's filamentous algae (FA) superficially apprears to be a species of Spirogyra that commonly is bright grass green and has a slimy slippery feeling. Many Spriogyra species grow well in the late winter to early spring when water is cold to cool. However the FA Cladophora can show up in spring after it began growing in late fall, and after winter and ice out it can become stressed and start floating to the surface.

During early spring when water is cold I think the best way to handle FA is removal, but this is not very practical with massive growths in a 2-5 acre pond. Many ponds and lakes often develop growths of FA in late winter early spring. As water warms and rooted submerged plants begin growing the FA often subsides due to competion for space and nutrients. But in high nutrient situations plenty of nutrients are available even after the rooted plants are growing thus both types of plants thrive. And if a pond has no rooted plants then the FA gets to party hardy all summer long. Then other methods are needed if non-mechanical control is desired.

See my addition at the bottom to Theo's post (lots of links to FA control) above where I mention the use of quick lime for FA control,

As a side note, I'm more interested in how much Chip's yellow perch that were stocked as 8"-10" adults grew for him from last spring to spring of 2008.

Here is a good PB Forum discussion about dealing with filamentous algae.
https://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=528559&page=1

Last edited by Bill Cody; 06/05/24 08:55 PM.

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Pithophora which is a coarse haired filamentous algae common is southern states can be killed with a combination of Reward and copper sulfate as described by Greg Grimes:
"Mix of liquid copper sulfate and reward will kill it just fine. Might have to treat twice to eradicate. If you want high fish production I suggest not using dye." Also see Greg's alternative suggestion for chemical control second post below.

However as we will see this chemical combination is best used in water with lower alkalinities. For Pithophora that grows in harder water or limestone based soils, see the next post by ewest for Pithophors control recomendations by Ohio State Univ.

Last edited by Bill Cody; 06/06/13 09:01 AM.

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Here is the info. As usual it is a mixed answer on the subject but I think we have the answer needed.

http://www.dnr.sc.gov/water/aquaff/pithalgae.html S.C. DNR

Ohio State University Fact Sheet
School of Natural Resources

http://ohioline.osu.edu/a-fact/0003.html This is a great link on FA
Copper-Resistant Algae in hard or high alkaline water:
One form of filamentous coarse hair algae, Pithophora, can be especially troublesome because it is resistant to normal applications of copper compounds. Although it is not widespread, scattered reports of Pithophora in Ohio ponds are received every year. If, after a normal treatment with copper sulfate, there is algae remaining that does not appear to be affected, it may be Pithophora. Positive identification can be made by sending a sample to the Plant and Pest Diagnostic Clinic at Ohio State University. Samples can be submitted directly to the clinic or through the county offices of Ohio State University Extension.

Pithophora is extremely difficult to control. Its unique cell wall structure and the tight clumping of filaments inhibit the penetration by copper. Additionally, large numbers of resilient spore-like bodies, called akinetes, germinate and provide a continuous source of new plants. Partial, short term control can usually be achieved with either of the following herbicide mixtures:

Ratio Application
Rate of Mixture
Mix 1. Cutrine Plus Liquid
and Diquat/Reward 1:1 2 gallons per acre-foot

Mix 2. Cutrine Plus Liquid
and Hydrothol 191 Liquid 2:1 1 gallon per acre-foot


Additionally, Cide-Kick, a nonionic spray adjuvant, should be added to the mixture at the rate of 1-2 gallons per surface-acre. This material acts as a cell wall penetrant to increase the effectiveness of the herbicides.



Last edited by Bill Cody; 08/21/14 08:02 PM. Reason: edited for clarity















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Greg Grimes offers his recipe for Pithophora control in southern soft waters:
This is what we do. Shawn Banks will tell you our mix works better for us in the SE than in the midwest because our water is so soft (see there is some advantage to having poor water quality)

Mix with a gallon of water:

8 ozs Ktea, Cutrine+, or other chelated copper herbicide, etc. (8% liquid copper)
4 ozs Reward
1 ozs surfactant, also called an adjuvant, examples "Cide Kick II, Cygnet Plus"

It will require couple of treatments.

This what come with experience and the problem with blanket algae statement on how to mix BUT

we give a good mist on the Pithophora, you can see it at this rate will lightly turn the alage blue. You do not have to hit it too hard but also if you spray one area and miss another area it is not giong to kill the missed area. You expect to miss some thus the reason for mutiple applications. THis combo will save quite a bit of money vs. using Reward alone. Hope this helps.

Last edited by Bill Cody; 06/25/08 09:48 PM.

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For wise management and effective chemical algae control and management, I am currently 'sold' on using peroxygen carbonate (Phycomycin, Pak 27, Green Clean Pro) especially in smaller ponds. Peroxygen leaves no residue, reacts quickly, will oxidize (breakdown) smallest organics, is not affected by water hardness, has minimal impact on invertebrates/fish, and helps oxygenate the pond as it reacts. As opposed to copper based products that always leave a metal based residue byproduct (copper carbonate) that is stable in the enviornment, acumulates with repeated use, and stays in the pond mostly in the sediments. Used correctly peroxygen products can be fairly selective on nuisance bluegreen algae blooms. It can be used efffectively to 'trim the bloom' and retard early stage algae growth.

For Filamentous algae (FA)one should treat it early when it is short and most vulnerable. This technique will require less chemical. Peroxygen products are not as effective when the algae problem is large or massive. Other methods should be used on heavy or dense, massive infestations. Peroxygen at the 80% active ingredient is best IMO. The dosage rate of label is 3-100lbs /acft. For FA control higher amounts in the 50-100 lbs per ac may be needed - again treat early before the growth gets thick and harder to kill. Light doses - applications are effective on floating films of bluegreen algae. I always suggest one test the product at various concentrations / rates in small areas to determine what is needed for each particular problemic algae.

Suggestion added Mar 13 2019
I suggest two methods, one for the hair algae(aka FA) and one for the chara. 1. depending on your preference for use of the heavy metal copper algaecide, a simple common way to temporarily kill it for your 0.1 ac pond is take a 1 cup of copper sulfate (CuSO4); best type to use is the form with particles 1/4"-3/4" size pieces. Divide the cup into 2 to 3 equal parts because you don't want it all dissolving quickly as you circle the pond applying esp when using the small fine sugar size particles. Put the chemical portions in some sort of small cloth bag or old fine mesh sock attached to a long handled garden? rake. Drag this unit quickly alone the shoreline as far out as the rake reaches. You should be able to dose one shoreline with the 1st dose. Refill the sock and do the other shoreline. etc until the entire 1 cup is consumed/dissolved. Another option is to use copper based Cutrine-Plus or similar brand of buffered copper product. Copper sulfate will not control Chara. Don't waste CuSo4 on Chara. Another common non copper product is GreenClean Pro - aka granular hydrogen peroxide. Follow instructions of the bag as a dissolved spray or granular spread technique.

2. Non algacidal method it control FA and Chara is to use tilapia. Tilapia work very good consuming algae and Chara IF you add enough numbers of tilapia to consume the volume of problem plants over the course of 4 to 8 weeks. Remember each fish can only eat just so much food per day. So amount that needs to be consumed is dependent on how big the problem is. IMPORTANT - Tilapia work best when a significant amount of algae is removed (manually or chemically) before the tilapia are introduced. This way they don't have a HUGE backlog(stockpiles) of algae to eat. Also note big predators will eat small size tilapia so be sure you are not just feeding your big bass expensive snacks.



Last edited by Bill Cody; 03/13/19 04:23 PM.

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Many have had good success using the correct number and size of blue tilapia for eating filamentous algae FA in ponds. Blue tilapia are reportedly best because they are more prolific than many other strains of tilapia and blue strain variety tolerates lower water temperatures that allows them to eat algae longer in the FA growing season. Larger sized tilapia for stocking are important to avoid LMB predation. Larger sized tipalia will also quickly spawn after stocking to produce lots of young tilapia who eat lots of newly sprouting filamentous algae - FA. They eat most all forms of fialmentous algae. When algae is eliminated they reportedly eat some organic muck that conatin nutritious bacteria from the sediments.

The following is a newspaper article telling about blue tilapia for algae control in water bodies.
http://www.toledoblade.com/MattMarkey/2012/05/18/Blue-tilapia-stars-in-pond-algae-war.html

Last edited by Bill Cody; 01/21/13 10:22 PM.

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More discussion on the control of filamentous algae and its causes:
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=322652#Post322652

Here is a good discussion about filamentous algae, its control by chemicals and tilapia, and some basic ecology of filamentous algae and how it "behaves" or why it grows in a pond especially a new pond.
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=337952&page=1

FA problems of a typical pond owner of a previously "used" pond.
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=338018#Post338018

FA manual removal and treatment ideas in this thread
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=418969&page=1

Homemade rake for manual removal of FA
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=413873&page=1

Manual Removal Seine and Parachute Shimmer
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=442640#Post442640

FA compared to mats of Bluegreen algae (Cyanobaceria - Lyngbya, Oscilatoria etc.).
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=454606#Post454606

Last edited by Bill Cody; 01/06/17 02:09 PM. Reason: Added a link

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Very good thread on FA pluses and minuses and control options and effects.


http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=387559&page=1

A discussion of the benefits of FA and how some pondowners manage the FA.
http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=409492&page=1

Attached Images
FA1.jpg
Last edited by ewest; 02/28/24 03:01 PM. Reason: added link
















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