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#6646 01/09/03 09:38 PM
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I've now seen two people now on two different sites (both biased to sell a particular product) say that aeration and adding bacteria to a pond will eliminate bottom sludge even in an old pond.

I use both, but I say it should be used in the beginning to prevent sludge buildup and won't do a lot to thick sludge that is already there. Am I correct?


If pigs could fly bacon would be harder to come by and there would be a lot of damaged trees.






#6647 01/14/03 10:10 AM
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I don't know the answer to your question Cecil, but I'm sure interested in the answer. It seems plausible at least.

#6648 01/14/03 10:26 AM
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I would have to be skeptical. Seems to me that although benefical bateria may break down some of the organic materials... even they would create some by-product. So even if you get rid of some 'sludge' I doubt highly you could get rid of all of it. The more sludge the harder to get rid of most likely. Add in the fact that the bacteria may or may not survive/flourish in any given environment. It would be interesting to do an out-of-pond experiment to test the claims. Did the companies give any idea of how long the process would take or if there are any caveats?


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#6649 01/14/03 12:18 PM
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From my use of bacteria, enzymes, and air I have noticed decreases in amounts of organics on the bottom. I think that the majority of the purpose of the bacteria and enzymes is to tie up the imediate available nutrients and reduce algae blooms. We have often seen large decreases around diffusers, but some may be due to water movement there. The big thing I think is that having an adequate oxygen level at the bottom allows the other critters to eat the organics along with the bacteria. This is converting the nutrients to weight on your fish. Here in the north most people prefer clear water, which is possible with this program. Make sure that you buy a blend of bacteria with many species. Most bacteria are specifically adapted to feed on one type of food. I agree that more research needs to be done. Some ponds benefit from the use of a rotation of two different brands. Think of the pond as a diluted septic system. fishmgr@hotmail.com

#6650 01/14/03 02:41 PM
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This is a question I asked on the old message board a year or two ago. What is the different between the high dollar bacteria sold at pond supply companies and the liquid bacteria I am buying at Home Depot and putting in my septic tank?
An article in Pond Boss about bacteria stated it needed two types of bacteria(names both started with an "A") which the septic tank stuff has both of.

#6651 01/14/03 04:14 PM
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Aerobic and Anerobic bacteria by chance?

Aerobic vs anerobic refers to the bacteria's metabolism, whether it needs oxygen or not.

Here is a question... does the stuff actually work in septic tanks?


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#6652 01/14/03 10:39 PM
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How can aerobic (oxygen 'breathing') bacteria live in a septic tank? Where is the oxygen in a septic tank??? Why put aerobic bacteria in a septic tank???
Research, by a local inventer who is working on a septic tank aerator system, has shown that average household septic tanks are so maxed out by organic decomposing solids (BOD) that oxygen concentrations drop back to zero in less than 1/2 hour once oxygen has been infused by either aeration or receiving a slug of "fresh" water.


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#6653 01/15/03 07:30 AM
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Thanks Pottsy those are the words I was looking for. I am not a septic tank expert but I would not think the tank would be totally void of oxygen. The water flushed or drained into the tank daily has oxygen in it. But back to the question if it does work in a septic tank and has aerobic and anerobic bacteria should it work in a pond?

#6654 01/15/03 11:40 AM
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My supplier of aeration systems, Vertex Water Features, is currently conducting a research project on the this subject with FLA DNR. I will forward the results when I have them. Don't hold your breath, it may be awhile, but will definently post them here.


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#6655 01/15/03 02:35 PM
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We use bacteria products. Here's what I have learned. First, every company claims to have "proprietary" formulations of bacteria cultures. They guard those recipes at all costs. That's because we can probably buy all the ingredients at most grocery or drug stores. I haven't yet figured out the price differences, because no one will own up to ingredients. So, there's no way to compare apples to apples.
But, we have gotten good results for the proper applications. Lagoons, retention ponds, ponds for aesthetic purposes..bacteria works well, as long as there is plenty of food for the microscopic critters. Dead algae, organic matter in pond bottom mud, will feed bacteria.
We have found bacteria to be an excellent alternative to algaecides in select situations. Algae has a rapid lifecycle, dying, growing, dying, using available nitrogen and phosphorus. Bacteria seems to tie up the nutrients and break the life cycle of algae, without the disruptive effects of some algaecides. But, expect to spend quite a bit more for bacteria than for algaecides.
Regarding pond muck, bacteria cannot possibly rid your pond bottom of all that black, stinky, gooey stuff. But, bacteria can certainly "eat" much of the organic matter, leaving behind a composted, digested layer of soils and broken down basic nutrients.
I haven't used any of the products in ponds where we are focused on raising fish. There, we add nutrients, manage fish, manipulate vegetation. Bacteria, for us, so far, has had minimal roles in managing recreational fish ponds.


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He can teach to catch fish...
#6656 02/01/03 09:19 PM
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hey guys,
Aerators definatly do work to eliminate bottom muck in the pond. I instaled 6 Vertex diffusers into my 8 acre lake and in a couple months places that had once been 4 inches of slimy, stinky goo were nice sandy bottoms. as far commercal bacteria I'm not sure because I've never used any but I have heard good things. But they do more than just "eat" muck they also do alot to improving water qualities mostly with 2 important types of bacterias.
1. bacteria from the genus nitrosanomas convert ammonia(a very toxic chemical) to nitrite (a semi-toxic chemical)
2. bacteria from the genus nitrobacter convert nitrite into nitrate (a non-toxic chemical that is usefull to planktonic algea)
Now obviously any pond that survives has both of these naturaly but as to wich specific species I can't tell you and it would vary anyways between brands.


Take great care of it, or let someone else have it.

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