Pond Boss Magazine
https://www.pondboss.com/images/userfiles/image/20130301193901_6_150by50orangewhyshouldsubscribejpeg.jpg
Advertisment
Newest Members
ax558, Mark Bordelon, jenniee, DrewSh, PBODE
17,836 Registered Users
Forum Statistics
Forums36
Topics39,896
Posts543,190
Members17,836
Most Online3,583
Jan 15th, 2020
Top Posters
esshup 26,889
ewest 21,074
Cecil Baird1 20,043
Bill Cody 14,350
Who's Online Now
8 members (catscratch, willyfield20, Bill Cody, tylerd1994, FishinRod, Ken77, Theo Gallus, Sunil), 215 guests, and 118 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,725
Likes: 295
F
Lunker
OP Online Content
Lunker
F
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,725
Likes: 295
I have put some of our common creek fish in aquariums to practice on their care (before I try on more important fish).

I have a green sunfish in a tank with some large gambusia. I have a recirculating pump in the tank so it is a little "loud" with some water movement - like their original home in the creek.

I have been feeding the sunfish crumbled dog food (since that is what drew him into the minnow trap) and small gambusia from another tank.

Yesterday, I picked up some meal worms and dropped one in the tank. The sunfish instantaneously shot out of the corner and snapped up the meal worm.

I have dropped several edible things into the tank for the sunfish. His reaction to the meal worm was at least 10x more aggressive than his reaction to other forage.

I assume it was by far his favorite food item that I have placed into the tank.

How did the sunfish immediately know that tasty forage was floating at the surface?

Did the mealworm transmit chemicals to the sunfish's taste/smell receptors? (It was a 20 gallon tank and the sunfish reaction appeared to occur more rapidly than the rate at which a chemical would have diffused.)

Did the sunfish detect some particular movements of the meal worm with his lateral line? (The sunfish was at the bottom of the tank under the pump return flow, the meal worm was floating at the surface.)

Not important questions, I am just trying to learn more about fish behavior if anyone wants to add some general knowledge to the thread.

Thanks,
FishinRod

Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 3,741
Likes: 116
P
Offline
P
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 3,741
Likes: 116
Remember Rod predators make their living hunting for grub. They have good sight also. When you approach the tank the fish know it’s dinner time

2 members like this: FishinRod, jpsdad
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,725
Likes: 295
F
Lunker
OP Online Content
Lunker
F
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,725
Likes: 295
Originally Posted by Pat Williamson
Remember Rod predators make their living hunting for grub. They have good sight also. When you approach the tank the fish know it’s dinner time

The fish have only been in the tanks about 10 days.

I am trying to feed train them by turning on the light and then immediately feeding. Based on the reactions of multiple species, I don't think I have feed trained them yet. It usually takes everyone a little while to find their food.

However, you may be correct that the sunfish immediately identified his tasty meal merely by sight identification. That would certainly match what I observed.

Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,631
Likes: 223
J
Offline
J
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,631
Likes: 223
I think sight is very important for any centrarchid. Not exclusively but important all the same. Once close the other senses play a role in confirming the attraction was warranted. Once a pattern develops, the fish is conditioned to respond.

As for the meal worm .... it is vastly more nutritious than dog food. Much higher concentrations of digestible protein. With the exception of feed developed for fry ... it's better than fish feed too.


It isn't what we don't know that gives us trouble, it's what we know that ain't so - Will Rogers


1 member likes this: 4CornersPuddle
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,725
Likes: 295
F
Lunker
OP Online Content
Lunker
F
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,725
Likes: 295
Originally Posted by jpsdad
As for the meal worm .... it is vastly more nutritious than dog food. Much higher concentrations of digestible protein. With the exception of feed developed for fry ... it's better than fish feed too.

I knew that, but I am pretty sure that sunfish had never before seen a meal worm.

However, it is his JOB to figure out what is most beneficial to his health. I was just very impressed at how quickly he identified an exceptionally nutritious meal!

Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 1,789
Likes: 262
S
Offline
S
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 1,789
Likes: 262
On a sidenote here, there is a reason Optimal make BG and Jr in varying lengths..one of those reasons is to somewhat mimic a larval worm of sorts. a round pellet is a learned trait.

Last edited by Snipe; 08/05/22 02:01 PM.
1 member likes this: FishinRod
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 3,741
Likes: 116
P
Offline
P
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 3,741
Likes: 116
Fish don’t have a big brain but it’s big enough to find a date,stay alive, and find food…

1 member likes this: FishinRod
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 1,789
Likes: 262
S
Offline
S
Joined: Oct 2018
Posts: 1,789
Likes: 262
Sounds like me Pat...

Joined: May 2014
Posts: 3,422
Likes: 174
A
Offline
A
Joined: May 2014
Posts: 3,422
Likes: 174
Originally Posted by Pat Williamson
Fish don’t have a big brain but it’s big enough to find a date,stay alive, and find food…

Interestingly, brain size matters less than you'd think. Lemurs with brains 1/200th the size of chimps' have a similar tested IQ.

And some intelligence seems pre-programmed, rather than the result of brain activity. Bacteria have no brains whatsoever, but will do smart things like share genes that protect against antibiotics.

They self-engineer mutations, too, contrary to neo-Darwinian random variation doctrine. Heck, they will even gather a quorum and chemically "vote" on what to do next in puzzling situations!

Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 3,741
Likes: 116
P
Offline
P
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 3,741
Likes: 116
Originally Posted by anthropic
Originally Posted by Pat Williamson
Fish don’t have a big brain but it’s big enough to find a date,stay alive, and find food…

Interestingly, brain size matters less than you'd think. Lemurs with brains 1/200th the size of chimps' have a similar tested IQ.

And some intelligence seems pre-programmed, rather than the result of brain activity. Bacteria have no brains whatsoever, but will do smart things like share genes that protect against antibiotics.

They self-engineer mutations, too, contrary to neo-Darwinian random variation doctrine. Heck, they will even gather a quorum and chemically "vote" on what to do next in puzzling situations!
Dang that is way over my pay grade….. lol

1 member likes this: anthropic
Joined: May 2014
Posts: 3,422
Likes: 174
A
Offline
A
Joined: May 2014
Posts: 3,422
Likes: 174
I used to think that my field, finance, was complex. It's child's play compared with biology!


Link Copied to Clipboard
Today's Birthdays
For the Family, honyok, Jakeroo, Zinki
Recent Posts
SMB for NOVA pond?
by Bill Cody - 08/16/22 08:19 PM
Just a little watermeal?
by LANGSTER - 08/16/22 04:17 PM
Would aeration help this scum?
by ewest - 08/16/22 01:18 PM
Catfish Die Off
by Dave Davidson1 - 08/16/22 08:46 AM
Sunfish Stocking, start with small or big?
by FishinRod - 08/16/22 08:27 AM
Will water lillies take over my pond?
by teehjaeh57 - 08/15/22 07:15 PM
Getting started on a 50 acre unmanaged pond
by FishinRod - 08/15/22 10:30 AM
New Southern Ohio Pond
by anthropic - 08/14/22 11:13 PM
Controlling Watershield
by Bill Cody - 08/14/22 06:52 PM
Grass Carp in California?
by FishinRod - 08/14/22 10:30 AM
Newly Uploaded Images
Alien lifeforms
Alien lifeforms
by cb100, August 11
test
test
by Dwight, July 29
My possible pond site
My possible pond site
by ArbyTX, July 27
test
test
by Dwight, July 22
Male RES
Male RES
by Shorty, June 27
New Record Bluegill
New Record Bluegill
by Theo Gallus, June 10

� 2014 POND BOSS INC. all rights reserved USA and Worldwide

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5