Pond Boss Magazine
https://www.pondboss.com/images/userfiles/image/20130301193901_6_150by50orangewhyshouldsubscribejpeg.jpg
Advertisment
Newest Members
LeahTerry, Lon M, toledo, JasmineHart, Mike Eoff
17157 Registered Users
Forum Statistics
Forums36
Topics38,701
Posts526,070
Members17,158
Most Online3,583
Jan 15th, 2020
Top Posters
esshup 25,188
ewest 20,532
Cecil Baird1 20,043
Bill Cody 13,706
Who's Online Now
11 members (Tbar, Rebecca, Mainahs70, Theo Gallus, Mike Troyer, Fyfer123, toledo, G_Stan2000@yahoo, 4CornersPuddle, RAH, anthropic), 340 guests, and 365 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Texas dam safety
#531532 03/05/21 01:36 PM
Joined: Apr 2020
Posts: 18
Likes: 1
R
RossC Offline OP
OP Offline
R
Joined: Apr 2020
Posts: 18
Likes: 1
We have a 45 acre community lake that is about 300 acre feet at normal pool.

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) regulates dams in the state. If you break their threashold (https://www.tceq.texas.gov/assets/public/compliance/field_ops/damsafety/DamSafetyGuidance090113.pdf) they will be around to inspect your dam. We are just over the threashold of 500 acre feet at maximum (top of dam). Based on a required engineering study, our spillway is inadequte to contain a 50% maximum flood event. Now TCEQ defines a maximum flood event as 48 inches of rain in 6 hours. Think about that for a minute. Hurrican Harvey produced 60 inches, but it was over 4 days. The engineering study computed that our 40 foot spillway would need to be 170 feet wide to handle this rain event. That is wider than our dam. Since we can't create a spillway that wide, and we can't raise the dam 7 or 8 feet, our only solution is to armour the dam. This entails stripping all the vegetation from the dry side and installing engineered soil retaining mats anchored into the dam, replacing the top soil, and reseeding. All in about $120,000 project plus $6000 for engineering studies.


Ross Canant
www.myoldtools.com
Re: Texas dam safety
RossC #531536 03/05/21 04:02 PM
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 191
Likes: 4
C
Offline
C
Joined: Dec 2014
Posts: 191
Likes: 4
Wow that sounds like something California would require

Re: Texas dam safety
RossC #531543 03/05/21 06:28 PM
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 483
Likes: 21
F
Lunker
Offline
Lunker
F
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 483
Likes: 21
You might try the old bureaucrat switcheroo.

Create a proposal for a sediment settling pond at the very upper end of your community lake. Figure out where to place the small dam to get the big lake below the 500 acre-feet limit.

There is a chance you could get approvals AND do that project for $20,000. It might actually be a win-win situation. A settling pond would keep your big lake cleaner following storm events and would slow your silting rate.

It would also be marginally safer. If the big dam fails in a flood, then the 50 acre-feet (or whatever) above the settling pond dam would not go rushing downstream.

Might as well make a good plan for submission. Create a design to have the capability to dredge or excavate the silt out of the settling pond in the original proposal and argue that you are significantly extending the life of your community lake.

Good luck on your big project!

Rod

Re: Texas dam safety
RossC #531567 03/06/21 12:00 PM
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 14,816
Likes: 30
D
Moderator
Lunker
Offline
Moderator
Lunker
D
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 14,816
Likes: 30
BS, I have never heard of 48 inches in 6 hours. Ask them when that has happened. Well,there was Noah, but that wasn’t in Texas.


It's not about the fish. It's about the pond. Take care of the pond and the fish will be fine. PB subscriber since before it was in color.

Without a sense of urgency, Nothing ever gets done.

Boy, if I say "sic em", you'd better look for something to bite. Sam Shelley Rancher and Farmer Muleshoe Texas 1892-1985 RIP
Re: Texas dam safety
Dave Davidson1 #531573 03/06/21 01:36 PM
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 483
Likes: 21
F
Lunker
Offline
Lunker
F
Joined: Nov 2007
Posts: 483
Likes: 21
Originally Posted by Dave Davidson1
BS, I have never heard of 48 inches in 6 hours. Ask them when that has happened. Well,there was Noah, but that wasn’t in Texas.

I agree with Dave. Is that a typo on your part, or a typo in their report?

I think 48 inches in 6 DAYS may be the maximum flood event calculation.

Re: Texas dam safety
RossC #531574 03/06/21 01:56 PM
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,001
Likes: 52
J
Offline
J
Joined: May 2018
Posts: 1,001
Likes: 52
Nederland in the Houston area probably set the record for texas in a single day ... 31.35 inches. Image from Wiki [Linked Image from upload.wikimedia.org]


Common sense is not so common - Voltaire

It isn't what we don't know that gives us trouble, it's what we know that ain't so - Will Rogers


Re: Texas dam safety
RossC #531579 03/06/21 04:53 PM
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 198
Likes: 8
D
Offline
D
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 198
Likes: 8
I think it was 2002, our second big flood event (1998 the first) for Bexar and surrounding counties, getting about 28 inches, I was caught at home, it had already been raining for some hours and was a flash flood event for all of Bexar county and the hill country beyond. The rain was torrential, like 1998, and for the same type event...moisture from bad 'ss hurricanes off of Baja sneaking across the two mountain ranges of Mexico and pouring down in central Texas...in October! The same effects as that for the model max, a gulf coast hurricane stalled out over the hill country. I had links to some really cool NOAH and NWS sites...they had live satellite feeds of "precipitable moisture," kilograms per square meter, I think on 100 meter squares, zoomable right down to about four square miles around me, this link is showing 25 (min) to 35 (max) kg/m^2 (color coded) rushing overhead at what looked like near a hundred miles an hour! (I will search for those links on an old computer). Outside was the sound of roaring falls as inches of water ran off the hills and rolled over lesser hills. Spectacular! All in a fog. With that event in mind, I'm happy my watershed is small. I am looking at catching our driveway run-off into a drain and pipe to the pond, with a valve to cut it off...I think a three inch rain, somewhat rare, but..., could replace half the water in the pond, but I wouldn't want that much..


Dan McWhirter
DannyMac

Link Copied to Clipboard
Today's Birthdays
FattyMcButterpants, sdstohler
Recent Posts
The Big Chill
by Tbar - 04/17/21 04:24 PM
Pondering a pond site
by Rebecca - 04/17/21 04:23 PM
Hybrid striped bass and walleye, when to add
by Fyfer123 - 04/17/21 03:55 PM
Mixing Diquat and Cutrine Plus
by jim100 - 04/17/21 02:00 PM
PVC Trees
by Flame - 04/17/21 01:38 PM
Thoughts on a new 2.7 acre pond stocking
by Heppy - 04/17/21 10:27 AM
Catfish bluegill feeding
by Layne - 04/17/21 08:09 AM
Core
by esshup - 04/17/21 04:39 AM
New member, first time pond owner
by FishinRod - 04/16/21 10:52 PM
Leaky Pond - Pond sealer
by teehjaeh57 - 04/16/21 06:42 PM
Yellow-perch larvae and fry.(video).
by azteca - 04/16/21 02:18 PM
What color of light.
by LeahTerry - 04/16/21 01:42 PM
Newly Uploaded Images
Establishing new Maine pond.
Establishing new Maine pond.
by Mainahs70, April 5
Mongo's New Pond
Mongo's New Pond
by Mongos Pond, February 27
Ice Ice Baby
Ice Ice Baby
by highflyer, February 21
ID?
ID?
by Quixotic, February 7
pond gone
pond gone
by Stressless, January 31

� 2014 POND BOSS INC. all rights reserved USA and Worldwide

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4