Pond Boss Magazine
https://www.pondboss.com/images/userfiles/image/20130301193901_6_150by50orangewhyshouldsubscribejpeg.jpg
Advertisment
Newest Members
A-aron, Gigi, Dan f, DE14362, jaeta
16848 Registered Users
Forum Statistics
Forums36
Topics38,211
Posts518,383
Members16,849
Most Online3,583
Jan 15th, 2020
Top Posters
esshup 24,435
ewest 20,286
Cecil Baird1 20,043
Bill Cody 13,435
Who's Online Now
14 members (Esa77, 4CornersPuddle, highflyer, MOFishermen, anthropic, Bocomo, Bobbss, Heppy, John Fitzgerald, Homewaters, gully washer, Snipe, KW35, ted_1209), 249 guests, and 358 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
The Disappearing Log
#513889 11/10/19 01:02 AM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 65
OP Offline
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 65
So my neighbor has had this 18" diameter 7' long oak log drying on his property for over two years and asked if I would like it for my pond. So I dragged it over to the pond's edge and tied a rope around it so that I could observe if it would float and if it didn't I had a way to retrieve it.

After a few days it is still floating, so I move it out in the pond and tie it to two floating fir logs that have been in the pond for 15 years - making a nice addition to some cover for the bass. All is well except a few mornings later I walk out and not only is the oak log gone, so are the two fir logs - the whole works now at the bottom of the pond.

So after extracting the whole mess from the pond with my tractor, I am now wondering - is this typical for an oak log to absorb water and then sink (I presume that is what happened here) - don't want to repeat the same fiasco again.

Last edited by Pond Star; 11/11/19 01:05 PM.

Re: The Disappearing Log
Pond Star #513890 11/10/19 05:50 AM
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 14,576
Likes: 9
D
Moderator
Lunker
Offline
Moderator
Lunker
D
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 14,576
Likes: 9
Hard to tell and I know nothing about fir. Could depend on the sizes of each type. But, I do know that my unused oak firewood is just about useless after a year.


It's not about the fish. It's about the pond. Take care of the pond and the fish will be fine. PB subscriber since before it was in color.

Without a sense of urgency, Nothing ever gets done.

Boy, if I say "sic em", you'd better look for something to bite. Sam Shelley Rancher and Farmer Muleshoe Texas 1892-1985 RIP
Re: The Disappearing Log
Dave Davidson1 #513894 11/10/19 11:56 AM
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 3,170
Likes: 10
P
Offline
P
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 3,170
Likes: 10
Odd Dave the trees that died when pond was dug from high water we cut into firewood they weren’t split till this fall and they are still wet after 5 years , won’t dry out till next year.... wood is odd!

Last edited by Pat Williamson; 11/10/19 04:35 PM.
Re: The Disappearing Log
Pond Star #513915 11/11/19 05:43 AM
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 14,576
Likes: 9
D
Moderator
Lunker
Offline
Moderator
Lunker
D
Joined: Jan 2006
Posts: 14,576
Likes: 9
Pat, maybe it's the difference in area. I'm hot and dry. The oak firewood that I cut and didn't use that is outside is just about gone. It will burn but not give heat. OTOH, some that I didn't use that is still in the house is in pretty good shape.


It's not about the fish. It's about the pond. Take care of the pond and the fish will be fine. PB subscriber since before it was in color.

Without a sense of urgency, Nothing ever gets done.

Boy, if I say "sic em", you'd better look for something to bite. Sam Shelley Rancher and Farmer Muleshoe Texas 1892-1985 RIP
Re: The Disappearing Log
Pond Star #513917 11/11/19 07:39 AM
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 240
Likes: 7
G
Offline
G
Joined: Dec 2018
Posts: 240
Likes: 7
Here in central MO there is a huge difference in what time of year the logs were cut, a log cut from Sep thru Dec will cure out and burn pretty great but after Jan they start taking up sap, and a log cut around March thru June will be absolutely water logged and seem to stay that way for a long period of time, some don't seem to ever dry out, definitely significantly inferior when it comes to using for firewood.
And yes oak logs will sink after they get waterlogged, if you will think about it they are way denser, heavier by far then the pine.


All the really good ideas I've ever had came to me while I was milking a cow.
Re: The Disappearing Log
Pond Star #513918 11/11/19 08:27 AM
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,241
Likes: 12
W
Offline
W
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,241
Likes: 12
From what I have been told by hardcore firewood guys rounds do not cure at all. Curing only begins once the wood is split. Uncovered split wood will rot MUCH faster than unsplit.


Keep This Forum Viable, Read Pond Boss Magazine -
America's Journal of Pond Management
Re: The Disappearing Log
wbuffetjr #513922 11/11/19 10:57 AM
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 5,855
Likes: 21
S
Offline
S
Joined: Oct 2013
Posts: 5,855
Likes: 21
In my youth my dad along with my two brothers cut fire wood for something to do and added income during the winter when not much else was going on at the farm other than feeding animals.

One year we had a logging company come in and log a bunch of larger trees. The tree tops and some bad logs were left. Dad was thinking the wood would be cured and dry. Left in the log it was still wet and did not dry out till we cut it up.

My experience is if it is left in a long log it will take a long, long time to cure out. It may rot before it cures. But once I cut it into fire wood length, split or not split, it cures pretty quickly.

We have a wood furnace in our house and I have been cutting trees up that a small tornado took out early this year. The wood is still wet but once I get it cut up will be fit to burn within a few weeks. I have cut probably 20 ricks of it so far for myself and for FIL/MIL that still cooks with wood. Pin oak and pecan mostly. I like burning hedge (osage orange) best but it is not what the storm blew down.


John

I subscribe to Pond Boss Magazine
Re: The Disappearing Log
Pond Star #513925 11/11/19 12:40 PM
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,241
Likes: 12
W
Offline
W
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,241
Likes: 12
Snrub

I could be wrong, but I THINK cured may be a relative term. Both of the guys I talked to have catalytic converters on their stoves (supposedly for increased efficiency??) and they refuse to burn any wood above a certain moisture content. They have meters and measure the moisture content of any wood they burn. According to them it takes two years for split, stacked and covered wood stored outdoors to reach an acceptable moisture content. I'm no expert as I don't burn much wood. Now-a-days it only gets cold enough here to burn every 2-3 years.


Keep This Forum Viable, Read Pond Boss Magazine -
America's Journal of Pond Management
Re: The Disappearing Log
Pond Star #513932 11/11/19 04:07 PM
Joined: Oct 2014
Posts: 6,066
Offline
Joined: Oct 2014
Posts: 6,066
Another opinion....IME firewood cures faster left uncovered and exposed to wind and sun. IMO A tarp cover to keep rain/snow out, also keeps moisture in. It would not be a surprise to me that a stack of green wood that is covered takes a very long time to cure.

Maybe the ideal situation would be only cover the stack to be cured when it is going to rain/snow! smile

On the other hand, if you have a stack of already well cured wood that you'll be wanting to burn that season, go ahead and cover it to keep the rain and snow off.

Last edited by Bill D.; 11/11/19 07:42 PM.

[Linked Image]
You'll never know what ya can catch unless you wet a line!
Re: The Disappearing Log
Pond Star #513937 11/11/19 05:55 PM
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,241
Likes: 12
W
Offline
W
Joined: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,241
Likes: 12
Pond Star - Not sure what specific Fir and Oak species you are working with. We have a ton of sub alpine fir at our place in CO and they are EXTREMELY sappy and seem to float forever. I would imagine that sap has something to do with their flotation. My guess is the lack of sap allows the Oak to sink.


Keep This Forum Viable, Read Pond Boss Magazine -
America's Journal of Pond Management
Re: The Disappearing Log
wbuffetjr #514646 12/04/19 11:56 PM
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 65
OP Offline
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 65


The piece of oak I mentioned is either black oak or white oak ...... not sure which it was. The fir is Douglas Fir.



Link Copied to Clipboard
Today's Birthdays
ealong59, loretta, Rick Elrod
Recent Posts
Aeration for newly stocked trout
by Esa77 - 09/22/20 11:20 PM
Pond flooding
by 4CornersPuddle - 09/22/20 11:07 PM
What did you do at your pond today?
by 4CornersPuddle - 09/22/20 11:00 PM
Think i put my pond in the wrong spot. Any hope?
by anthropic - 09/22/20 10:48 PM
Newbie with Aeration ?s
by 4CornersPuddle - 09/22/20 10:47 PM
4 years into a SMB/WE/YP/GSH/BG pond
by canyoncreek - 09/22/20 08:29 PM
New Member . Thanks for the help
by Steve_ - 09/22/20 03:19 PM
Bass Looking Better
by Augie - 09/22/20 02:02 PM
Spillway Renovation Cost On 50 Acre Lake
by Bocomo - 09/22/20 01:18 PM
Pond bottom
by RedOlin - 09/22/20 12:56 PM
Ag lime spreader
by ewest - 09/22/20 11:40 AM
Beavers
by Pat Williamson - 09/22/20 11:39 AM
Newly Uploaded Images
1 Year Old Pond
1 Year Old Pond
by KW35, September 15
Our Pond Dredging Rehab Progress
Our Pond Dredging Rehab Progress
by Lori, September 6
Gast Pump Housing
Gast Pump Housing
by RWoodshvac, July 4
dam blowout/convert to spillway
dam blowout/convert to spillway
by drrehak, June 30
Transport Cooler
Transport Cooler
by Shorty, June 7

� 2014 POND BOSS INC. all rights reserved USA and Worldwide

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.4