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Chemical relief for cattails
#42511 09/09/02 10:24 AM
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I have tried all of the natural remedies for cattails, now I need chemical relief. What is a good chemical treatment, that will not harm my fish?

Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42512 09/09/02 01:21 PM
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I finally got tired of fighting them year after year too and used a product called Eagre. It's $74.00 a quart from Stoney Creek Fisheries and Equipement Co. at 800-448-3873. They have a website at www.stoneycreekequip.com

I mixed it in a sprayer at the rate of 2 oz per gallon of water along with an activator (cide kick II) at the rate of 3 oz. per gallon of water. I saturated all of the cattails twice within a week. They turned yellow and started to wilt in a couple of weeks and then I used a manual weed cutter to cut them down and once they floated to shore raked them out and discarded them to prevent decomposition in the water and euthropication. I did not see any problems with the fish.

I do have a few cattails popping up from time to time but they are easy to pull out as they are new shoots. I would spray these too but now I have more desirable plants taking the place of the cattails and I don't want to kill them.


If pigs could fly bacon would be harder to come by and there would be a lot of damaged trees.






Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42513 09/09/02 03:51 PM
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How about glyphosate?

Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42514 09/09/02 04:50 PM
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Not a chemical expert by an means so I can't answer your question. I just know what worked for me. However I'm sure someone will come along and answer your question as there are some more knowlegable and experience people on this site.


If pigs could fly bacon would be harder to come by and there would be a lot of damaged trees.






Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42515 09/09/02 08:28 PM
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Fishman,Cecil, Tom: Cecil what did you mix with Eagre besides water? If Cecil looks on the label of Eagre, I'll bet Cecil all the trout in his pond that it will say glyphosate as an active ingredient. I say this because Stoney Creek says the product needs an activator and Eagre is only for plants around the pond not submerged plants. Plus this is the only glysophate type acting product in their catalog. Sounds a lot like a glyphosate to me. Since Roundup went off patent there are a lot of copycat glysophate products hitting the market.

TOM: have you tried cutting the cattails off below the water line in fall and allowing the ends to be submerged under ice all winter? We've had pretty good luck getting a non- chemical kill this way. The stems have to be above water during winter dormancy for the roots to get oxygen thru the porus stems. Without oxygen most of the roots below the waterline die during dormancy and do not regrow in the spring. I don't know if this works in ice free areas of the country. We discovered this from lily pond owners who cut off the cattail stems and submerged the pot for winter. Cattails would not regrow in spring.


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Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42516 09/10/02 09:38 AM
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Tom,
4oz. Rodeo per gallon of water plus a good surfactant and the cattails die including the roots and bulb. Needs to be applied in warm weather. early spring doesn't seem to work as well. I've used this formula for years and it works great.

Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42517 09/10/02 08:40 PM
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Glyphosate & Cattails. D. Reed you've found that treating cattails works better later in the season because in spring cattails are not transfering a lot of the leaf products to the roots. In spring most of the fluid movement is root to leaf for growth. As the season progresses they begin storing more and more leaf production products to the roots and this is when the herbicide gets better delivery to the root, esp. during late summer & autumn.


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Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42518 09/12/02 09:34 PM
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Tom, Cecil, et al: Eagre, Rodeo, Aquamaster, AquaPro, AquaNeat, etc. are all 53.8% active-ingredient (a.i.) formulations of glyphosate which are labeled for aquatic-use. Although glyphosate is the same a.i. found in ROUNDUP, don't use it for aquatic treatments as it contains a specific surfactant (tallow amine type) that is not overly friendly to desireable aquatic organisms - including fish. The aquatic formulations may be safely used, in conjunction with an aquatic-labeled surfactant, in ponds, streams and lakes without any water-use restrictions (except that an established set-back distance must be maintained from active potable-water intakes). The products should be mixed with water at a 3/4% solution (1 oz/gal.) and applied on a spray-to-wet basis or applied in a broadcast fashion at the rate of 3 qts./acre. in sufficient water to obtain good coverage. Depending upon the quality of the tank-mixed surfactant, I'd generally suggest adding 1 - 2 oz. of surfactant per gal. of solution in most types of hand-held, back-pack or power-sprayers. Optimum results are obtained when treatments are made at or after the catkin formation stage. At this point, the plant's physiology changes gears from "new growth" to "reproductive & nutrient storage". Accordingly, the odds of obtaining maximum root control are greatest during this period (and until fall transition occurs).
On another note, unlike our northern counterparts, ice on Texas-ponds has been a rare to non-existant occurance over the past several winters. Bill, your suggestion might have merit in other regions - but such attempts have been fruitless down here. Lastly, $74/qt. is rather steep, considering the recent and rapid drop in glyphosate pricing. Regards, Kelly

Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42519 09/14/02 05:02 PM
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Thanks for the feedback. I will try the rodeo or eagre. I was just wondering if Remedy might be a possible solution? I have stayed away from it due to the label warning for fish and water use.

Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42520 09/14/02 08:31 PM
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REMEDY (triclopyr ester) is definitely not appropriate for aquatic-use (as with all liquid ester herbicide formulations). Ester formulations differ from amine formulations in many ways. For instance: Esters are oil-soluble and water-emulsifiable while amines are water-soluble. Esters also have much higher risk to fish and other aquatic creatures.
There is an amine formulation of triclopyr, which may receive EPA-registration for aquatic uses next year. Until then, there are no appropriate uses of triclopyr in aquatic sites.
Beyond all of this, triclopyr (and other "hormone herbicides") are almost exclusively "active" on broadleaf and woody plants - with little to no activity on grassy plants.
Hope this helps. KD

Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42521 09/15/02 09:17 AM
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Before we resorted to a chemical, we decided to try another method. We saw this recipe for a weed killer using 2 gal white vinegar, 1 lb of table salt, and 2 tblsp liquid dishwashing soap. We mixed this in a 2 1/2 gal sprayer. MIX WELL. It takes a bit for the salt to be dissolved.....Spray the cattails 2 times a week. We saw results after the 2 sprayings. The cattails turned white and finally brown and died. We've used this on poison ivy also and it seems to do the trick. It also works on small patches of duckweed. It doesn't work as fast as the chemicals but it's cheap and safe......

Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42522 09/15/02 11:06 PM
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Troll - with utmost respect for your intentions:
Vinegar, table salt and detergents all meet the general definition of "chemicals". Using such items to control a pest places them - by EPA definition - into the "pesticide" category (regardless of their origin).
Nicotine sulphate (an organic substance) was one of the original insecticides utilized in agriculture. It was banned for such uses decades ago in the US (due to its carcenogistic characteristics).
In reality, table salt and vinegar are more "toxic" than many modern herbicides. Dosage makes the "poison".
As for economy: unless your mixture-cost was less than $1.10/gal., it was more expensive and labor-intensive to utilize. KD

Re: Chemical relief for cattails
#42523 09/28/02 06:55 PM
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Not to mention that dish soap is toxic to aquatic life. Rodeo and Cide-Kick are much safer than any home brewed poison mixture.


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