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Easy Hook Removal
#128873 08/11/08 08:27 AM
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Shorty Offline OP
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Here is a link for easy hook removal from In-fisherman.

http://www.in-fisherman.com/magazine/articles/if2806_HookRemoval/index.html


I also have another quick and easy method that I use primarily on LMB that have swallowed a texas rigged rubber worm very deep.

No real fish were harmed for these photos. (One will have to pretend that this sock and film canister are the throat of a deep hooked LMB.) This method works extremely well with LMB where you have room to maneuver your index finger and thumb inside the mouth. This method is not recommended for "toothy critters" like musky or northern.



1. Slide your index finger past the crusher teeth and to the inside bend of the hook, align your fingernail along the barb.



2. Push in slightly and away from the side of the throat that the hook is lodged in using your index finger. After pushing in slightly start to use your thumb to turn the hook eyelet or "tie" upside down along the side the gills. Pushing inward slightly at first backs the hook out of where it intitially went in, use your fingernail to prevent the barb from doing more damage as you continue to turn the hook around using your thumb.



3. Continue to rotate the hook and push away from the side of the throat that was hooked.



4. Once rotated far enough the hook should pop right out with very little damage to the throat. Notice the fingernail covering the barb of the hook.



This might not work for small fish but it sure does work well on a LMB that has swallowed a texas rigged rubber worm deeply. It takes roughly the same amount of time to remove the hook as any other place in the mouth. Using needle nose pliers though the gills are not required with this method. All you need is enough room to manuever your index finger and thumb inside the mouth. \:\)




Re: Easy Hook Removal
Shorty #128876 08/11/08 08:58 AM
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Shorty, I favor a 12" Hemostat for large fish and a 6" for smaller fish. A Hemostat allows you to have full view of the situation, it locks hard on the hook and you have complete directional control of the hook. It also works on toothy criters and Snapping Turtles.


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Re: Easy Hook Removal
Dwight #128878 08/11/08 09:06 AM
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Shorty Offline OP
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Admit it Dwight, you just don't want to stick your index finger past the crusher teeth, that does have kind of a wierd feel to it.

Actually, my short and easy hook removal method for LMB prevents the barb from doing additional damage as the hook is removed, that is not quite as easy to do with just hemotsats or needle nose pliers. ;\)

I do have to admit my method has to be done by feel rather than by sight though.



Re: Easy Hook Removal
Shorty #128882 08/11/08 09:37 AM
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My better half wants to help me shop for a new hoe. I did make her a promise to take her to the Jhon Deere dealer and she can help me make the the right choice and I promised to spring for a new outfit for her to wear since her opinion is important to me and I never buy her clothes. I have her word that she will help me in any way she can to make my mind up to choose the proper machine and not got over board.{HpHpHp]
Me being the sport I am also promised to stop for Ice Cream at the stand in Bloomingburg my treat after testing new equipment. This link is for all you mud movers that think youre the best.
http://videos.komando.com/2008/06/21
It might be ice crem for one


Scott Trava
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Re: Easy Hook Removal
Scott Trava #128888 08/11/08 10:03 AM
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Best way for hook removal is to mash the hook barb down - especially for CPR fish....

It is MUCH less painful when removing hooks from yourself...



N.E. Texas 2 acre and 1/4 acre ponds
Original george #173 (22 June 2002)




Re: Easy Hook Removal
george1 #128893 08/11/08 10:25 AM
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 Originally Posted By: george1
It is MUCH less painful when removing hooks from yourself...

That's what I was at first afraid Shorty was gonna show us pictures of.


"Live like you'll die tomorrow, but manage your grass like you'll live forever."
-S. M. Stirling
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Re: Easy Hook Removal
george1 #128894 08/11/08 10:26 AM
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Unless you are talking about a rubber tired Hoe Scott the best thing you can do is drive right past that John Deere dealership then, heh heh. Ought to be a Cat dealer around somewhere??

I have used that same method of finger removing large hooks for years. It doesn't work so well on toothy fish like Northerns or Walleyes, but LMB benefit greatly from it as Shorty points out. My Dad has a small plastic hook remover from way back when that does the same thing, it is shaped like a pencil with a bobber on the end and it has a groove in it to follow the line down to the hook. I will see if I can find one, I think Netcraft carries them.


The world contains a finite amount of facts, but there are infinite ways to put them to use.

Be a fountain in life, not a drain....
Re: Easy Hook Removal
Scott Trava #128897 08/11/08 10:38 AM
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Wow, that was pretty cool. However, one more item and I'd have been REALLY impressed... \:\/


In a lifetime, the average driver will honk 15,250 times. My wife figures I'm due to die any day now...



Re: Easy Hook Removal
Matt Clark #128909 08/11/08 01:01 PM
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Here is a tool for that same job on toothy fish.

http://www.jannsnetcraft.com/hook-sharpeners-removers/050209019174.aspx


The world contains a finite amount of facts, but there are infinite ways to put them to use.

Be a fountain in life, not a drain....
Re: Easy Hook Removal
JoeG #128951 08/11/08 08:22 PM
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I know this thread is about removing hooks -- but what if you can't remove the hook for some reason?

On fish with smaller mouths, such as bluegill and red ears, what is the chance the fish will survive if the line is cut right at the hook, the hook is left in the fish, and the fish is released?

I guess the same would apply to fish like large northerns and muskies, where I sure wouldn't want to try and hold open their mouths.

I've never believed that fish hooks dissolve in three days, as I've heard so many times. I've caught fish with hooks that had apparently been in a fish's lip for at least several weeks, because I recognized the hooks and rigs used by pond guests.

Earlier this summer I hauled in a pretty good size bass that had broken my line about two months earlier when fishing for trout with 2# test line, and a #12 hook. About 90% of the hook, all except the crushed barbed tip (I crush the barbs on all my hooks), was sticking out of the bass's anus. The hook was still in perfect shape.

Lastly, I read the article linked by Shorty, and it talks about how tough the gill plates are. Is there really any chance that a bleeding fish hooked in the gills will recover, whether the hook is removed or left in place?

P.S. Over the years I've purchased a number of hook removers exactly like the one posted by JoeG. Maybe I just never really learned how to use it, but I've not had much luck with them. If I couldn't reasonably get a hook out with forceps, I've felt the fish was going to die from my trying, or it was going to die because I released it with a hook in its gullet.



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Re: Easy Hook Removal
catmandoo #128953 08/11/08 08:54 PM
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Cat, last year I deep-hooked my prize tagged RES (ole "yellow 032"). I removed the snelled hook from a snap swivel, released him, and kept my fingers crossed.

About 10 days later, I caught him again - sans snelled hook and in good health. I don't think a gold finish aberdeen dissolved or rusted that quick, but he had horked it up somehow.

So I am sure removing the line and leaving the hook improves their chances in at least some instances.


"Live like you'll die tomorrow, but manage your grass like you'll live forever."
-S. M. Stirling
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Re: Easy Hook Removal
Theo Gallus #128954 08/11/08 09:09 PM
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Shorty, great post!

Catmandoo, I too have seen a bass that was in the process of passing a hook. He was in good health, and it was almost all the way out.


Get out and fish.
Re: Easy Hook Removal
jakeb #128976 08/12/08 07:44 AM
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I hooked #8 steel hook into a stick just below the water about 3 months ago, and it's still there. I think it would dissolve a little quicker in a fish, but still take a month or more to drop off. I bet big hooks or nickel plated hooks take a lot longer to rust away.

Re: Easy Hook Removal
catmandoo #128986 08/12/08 08:12 AM
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Joe G Those Cats will get you in the hole but tough comin out


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Re: Easy Hook Removal
Scott Trava #128987 08/12/08 08:21 AM
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Found something relevant to this discussion today by Ralph Manns:

Hooks In or Out?
by Ralph Manns

Getting the word out on hook removal. Those of us who try to share the findings of scientific study with non-scientists are often frustrated. It seems very difficult to get the word out. We write about some important discovery, but find anglers, particularly the influential professional bass anglers, either don't read the new information or dismiss the new scientific insights because they conflict with beliefs the anglers already hold.


Professional and TV anglers aren't the only ones to be slow in learning and applying the latest "word" from scientists. Biologists, particularly state fisheries workers are too busy with their own assigned tasks to read all of the literature produced by other scientists. They continue to advise anglers to handle fish using outmoded procedures.

The recommendation that anglers cut the leader close to the hook when bass are "deep-hooked" is a good example. It is hard to find a publication on catch-and-release (C&R) techniques that doesn't pass on this poor advice. Yet, recent research on release techniques strongly suggests there is a better way.

Some years ago, Doug Hannon noted that most magazine articles and state publications recommend leaving hooks in bass and other fish to "rust" out. He claimed that hooks don't rust fast enough, even in salt water; and suggested that the shank of a hook pointing up the throat of a bass acts like a lever or trap door that prevents swallowing. Bass can die of starvation while waiting for normal body processes to eject the hook. Food coming down a bass' throat will bypass a hook-shank, IF the shank lies tightly against the side of the throat where the barb is lodged.
However, if the shank protrudes into the throat, food coming down can push the shank across the esophagus, blocking it. Deep-hooked bass may
even feel pain as the food rotates the barb and regurgitate the food.
Recently, Hannon's observations have been scientifically verified. John Foster, Recreational Fisheries Coordinator for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, studied striped bass at Chesapeake Bay. His researchers held throat-hooked stripers between 16- and 28-inches long for observation in half-strength seawater so that hooks had ample opportunity to rust away. Size 1/0 and 2/0 stainless steel, bronzed, nickel, tin and tin-cadmium hooks were hooked in the top of each fish's esophagus, with an 18-inch length of line connected to the hook.

After four months, 78 percent of the hooks were still imbedded. Cadmium coated hooks poisoned 20 percent of the fish, and production of these hooks has been stopped. Bronzed hooks were less likely (70%) to be retained than tin-cadmium (80%), nickel (83%), or stainless steel (100%) hooks.

In a second test, the line was clipped at the eye of the hook, as advised by most existing C&R guides. One-hundred percent of the stainless hooks were again retained, while 56 percent of tin, 76 percent of bronze, 84 percent of tin-cadmium, and 88 percent of nickel hooks remained. Fish mortality was greater when all line was trimmed. Foster theorized that the lengths of line hanging from a fish's mouth kept the hook-shank flat against the side of the esophagus and allowed food to pass. Without the line, food could move the hook and close the throat.

Hooks rusted slowly in stages, and the bend and barb became smaller very gradually. Stripers formed scar tissue around imbedded hook points, a typical reaction of body tissue to foreign matter. Foster noted, however, that once the tough scar tissue formed, hooks became more, not less, difficult to remove. Months after fish were hooked, infections sometimes developed around points, causing some deaths.
Based on his research, Foster recommended anglers carefully remove even deeply imbedded hooks. If the hook can not be removed, then it seems better to leave about 18 inches of line attached. Perhaps, someday, these findings will reach C&R anglers, the biologists who are researching C&R and publish C&R guidelines, and TV anglers who teach by their example.
Another good idea is to carry strong wire-cutting pliers. Cur off protruding barbs in the throat and the hook shank falls free easily.

Texas researchers recently compared the mortality of largemouth bass hooked with live bait and artificial lures. Their main finding: "there is no biological justification to regulate use of live bait to catch bass" has been widely publicized. Other findings may help anglers make appropriate adjustments in technique.

In two separate tests, largemouth bass in a private water were landed by TPWD anglers using Carolina-rigged scented plastic worms, crankbaits with multiple treble hooks, and live carp fished with either a Carolina rig or a float. To simulate normal fishing conditions, anglers with different levels of expertise were used.

While fishing with floats, anglers were instructed to delay hooksets until floats went completely under, simulating the way typical amateur anglers fish with unattended rods. Under all other conditions, anglers were to strike immediately upon feeling a hit. Captured bass were immediately examined to identify hook-related injuries. When bass were hooked deep in the throat, the line was cut and hook left in place. (TPWD did not identify whether the cut was made in the traditional way near the hook, or with line remaining outside the fish's mouth.) Bass were then kept in a large holding net over a 72-hour observation period to determine short-term mortality rates. Sixty bass were taken using each method. Tests were made in August, when water was warm and stress and mortality are normally high.

The average mortality under these worst-case conditions was 22 percent. Carolina rigs with scented worms caused the highest mortality, followed by live carp used under floats, crankbaits, and Carolina-rigged carp minnows.
TPWD biologists concluded that the timing of the hookset appeared more critical than the type of bait used in the determination of short-term death rates. The data show bass hooked in the throat had poor survival odds. Evidently, largemouth bass took both lures and live bait fully into their mouths almost immediately. The bass pros' advice to strike without delay is important to reduce fish mortality. Angling techniques that delay hooksets should be avoided.

Carolina-rig and worm combos likely killed more fish because the loose-floating leader prevented immediate detection of some strikes and flavored worms are easily swallowed or held in the back of a bass' mouth. Eighteen percent of bass taken on rigs with worms were throat-hooked.

In contrast, Carolina rigs with live bait and live baits under floats caused less mortality, likely because live preyfish are often held in a bass' mouth for a few seconds, killed, and turned to be swallowed headfirst. This gives anglers a few seconds more to detect hits before baits are ingested. The decision to delay hits when live baits were used with floats and to strike immediately with Carolina-rigged baits likely caused the different mortality rates of these two techniques. Nevertheless, 10 percent of bass hooked on Carolina-rigged live baits were hooked in the esophagus.

It is no surprise that crankbaits are less likely to be swallowed, as their artificial nature is immediately detectable to fish. When fisheries are managed primarily for C&R or trophy bass production, it may be appropriate to ban use of multiple rods to reduce delayed hooksets, or to limit lures to items unlikely to be swallowed. In any case, C&R sportsmen will want to avoid techniques that delay hooksets, like fishing with unattended rods.

The TPWD study showed that bass hooked in the tongue and esophagus had about a 50 percent chance of dying, while bass hooked in the lips mouth, jaw, roof of mouth had 25 percent or less mortality. Interestingly, only 12.5 percent of gill hooked fish died. This finding suggests anglers who kill and eat or mount gill-damaged bass because "they are unlikely to live" are in error.

TPWD also compared the survival of bass when they were bleeding and when leaders were cut and hooks left in the fish. Removing hooks improved bass survival when bass were not bleeding. But there was little difference in mortality when bass were bleeding or hooks were left in the fish.
Anglers practicing C&R rather than to eat bass might note these findings. Fish caught with only superficial wounds are likely to survive release. Small, deeply-hooked and bleeding bass likely should be eaten, rather than released to die later. But lunker bass are so valuable that they should be immediately released, even if they are bleeding or deeply-hooked. Remove the hook if posible. Leave an 18-inch leader if you can not remove the hook.

Ralph Manns



Re: Easy Hook Removal
bobad #128988 08/12/08 08:31 AM
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 Originally Posted By: bobad

I hooked #8 steel hook into a stick just below the water about 3 months ago, and it's still there. I think it would dissolve a little quicker in a fish, but still take a month or more to drop off. I bet big hooks or nickel plated hooks take a lot longer to rust away.

Here's a couple of pictures of a #10 bonze steel hook that made the "trip" unscathed.....
Don't know how long it took however, but I could have tied the hook back back on and recycled..

Another good reaason to mash the barbs... \:\)




N.E. Texas 2 acre and 1/4 acre ponds
Original george #173 (22 June 2002)




Re: Easy Hook Removal
george1 #129006 08/12/08 11:50 AM
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Scott you can only mean $$ wise, because in the ground and pound for pound, no other excavator beats a Cat. Also have the highest resale value, now why is that???


The world contains a finite amount of facts, but there are infinite ways to put them to use.

Be a fountain in life, not a drain....
Re: Easy Hook Removal
JoeG #129008 08/12/08 12:57 PM
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Self Moderated.... ;\)

Last edited by george1; 08/12/08 06:04 PM. Reason: self moderated


N.E. Texas 2 acre and 1/4 acre ponds
Original george #173 (22 June 2002)




Re: Easy Hook Removal
Shorty #129017 08/12/08 02:37 PM
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Shorty,

Thanks for the great article by Ralph Manns. That answered a lot of questions I've had for years.

Regards,
Ken


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Re: Easy Hook Removal
catmandoo #129185 08/13/08 06:41 PM
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Joe G you are teasing me Mr deere always comes to the rescue and the paint last long The local yamar dealer came by with a 75 with a thumb what do you think.You are an old master of equipment I was going to give a try on friday it looks cheap but it looks stong in other areas it has a 8 inch pivot pin the sales man thinks it can fly to the moon. My father always said if it looks pretty test it out and put it in the mud. The machine does matter if the carver does not solve the 5 parts of the puzzle then the customer is at a loss. This Saturday I have an appointment at Shin Creek Rd In Lew Beach There has been a gentleman working there for 4 months and he has almost 4 million dollars worth of equipment there and has made an impression of a lost lever operator at $200.00 per hour plus machine.

I asked Mr Hager the owner if anyone walked the woods and checked for road drainage the neighbors pond supply also if citerene would be put in place to control supply to pond with a 6 inch feed pipe and off that a lateral level run off to control turbid water. There was a Class 3 trout stream The Beaverkill that requires no turbid water, double silt fence, tree canopy fencing 10 foot above the toe of the dam and no impoundment of more than 5,000,000 gallons on a 7' dam.
To top it off the dirt man was going to cover up a seasonal stream that goes dry in late fall but if you had to measure the depth across the banks would be 9' deep and 8' across this tells us it has been there for 600 years if you do the math and no matter what clay we pack in and how deep we go the pond that is built below the stream might drain



GFood Luck


Scott Trava
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http://catskillpond.com
scott@catskillpond.com
Returning Catskill Waters To A Simpler Time
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Re: Easy Hook Removal
Scott Trava #129231 08/14/08 06:29 AM
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Actually Scott, I have always believed the best dealer support wins my business, usually tough to beat Cat in that regard too.

What are the 5 pieces of the puzzle you refer to?


The world contains a finite amount of facts, but there are infinite ways to put them to use.

Be a fountain in life, not a drain....

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