Pond Boss
The entire property is 480 Acres , 228 Acre Lake plus 2 smaller ponds that are 10 acres in total

The big lake has an area that is about 25 acres and itís a flat of sorts, water is about 3-4 feet in that area. I suspect this lake has depths to 35 ft + Old road beds etc.

Has anyone on here dealt with a property like this ? Where do I start ? Any referrals in my area ( South Louisiana )

My goal is to make this a fishing lake and restore the sandy soil covering much of the property as well as I can. There are pines planted in the sand that are growing but thatís going to be really slow.

I have this property under contract and am doing a Phase I environmental etc.



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Posted By: Zep Re: Buying property w 228 Acre former gravel pit - 12/17/18 04:25 AM
certainly a unique property....can you post any pics from ground level?...I assume you will be "protected" in the contract so that the EPA or some other entity can't come hold you responsible down the road for some kind of costly environmental clean-up?
Originally Posted By: Zep
certainly a unique property....can you post any pics from ground level?...I assume you will be "protected" in the contract so that the EPA or some other entity can't come hold you responsible down the road for some kind of costly environmental clean-up?


Iím trying to upload the photos. Itís somehing to see
Originally Posted By: Zep
certainly a unique property....can you post any pics from ground level?...I assume you will be "protected" in the contract so that the EPA or some other entity can't come hold you responsible down the road for some kind of costly environmental clean-up?


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Originally Posted By: Parabola
Originally Posted By: Zep
certainly a unique property....can you post any pics from ground level?...I assume you will be "protected" in the contract so that the EPA or some other entity can't come hold you responsible down the road for some kind of costly environmental clean-up?


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It would be a nice Walleye lake. Oh I can taste them now.
Neat looking BOW. Welcome to the forum.

I have no experience with gravel pits other than what I have read here on PBF. So anything I say is mostly just regurgitated information.

Early on a water test would be helpful to see just what you have in water quality. I suspect it is very low fertility but that can be overcame with a feeding program. Any amendments to a BOW that size will take some time and investment. That is the disadvantage to a large BOW. The management and resource requirements go way up. But with big risks come big rewards also.

There are some Nebraska guys on here that have experience with quarrys and/or gravel pits.

I see the two smaller ponds as a plus. Stocking a BOW that large is going to be expensive if you do it correctly. The small ponds could be used as forage or grow out ponds for the main pond to aid in the main BOW management.

Is it a ground water pond or watershed pond? I would guess a ground water being a gravel pit but it could be either.

Good luck if you proceed with the purchase and keep us informed on your progress. You can use the "My Stuff" tab to put your threads on a "Watch List" so you can keep track of them. After a few days or weeks a thread you are interested in can become burried and very hard to find. The Watch List helps you keep track of interesting threads.
Looks like lots of very cool possibilities. Please keep us updated! So many people never come back to tell anymore of their story.
Great looking ! I would suggest you get in touch with Bob Lusk, this is his place along with his Magazine that you can also get here. Since you are new to all this lake and pond stuff, you might need a good pond guy to get you started toward your goals. I makes things a lot easier if you know what you have below the water line. Fish and the bottom.
Does look nice. I should get me some land with a pond. That way I don't have to build one.
Posted By: Zep Re: Buying property w 228 Acre former gravel pit - 12/17/18 03:26 PM
Thanks for the additional pics Parabola. I feel much better about your new property seeing the trees along the shoreline. Gosh looks like some great bodies of water. Have you had a chance to run a depth finder over the big lake to see how deep it is? When I was a kid I fished two abandoned Quarries. One my Mom would drop us off in the morning and we would have a blast all day....it was a very large body of water...(my guess 100 acres)...with a gradual drop from shore but very deep and very clear....we caught a lot of fish out of it. The second was small (about 2-3 acres) and basically a straight drop into deep water...had some luck but not much. I hope environmentally your lakes will work with fish because it looks like a really cool project. Keep us in the loop.
First, you have to know what you are starting with, and where you want to be at some point in the future. Get with someone Like Bob Lusk to develop a plan to get you where you want to be on your budget.
Originally Posted By: wannapond0001
Does look nice. I should get me some land with a pond. That way I don't have to build one.


Building your own pond is like building your own house. It's a blast, but a major pain when you make mistakes -- and you will make mistakes.

Still, I don't regret it, despite the cost of money, time, and energy. There's something special about catching (and eating) your own fish, watching your project bring joy to kids, and experiencing fellowship with folks you invite.

That all said, it is simpler & cheaper to buy an already existing place. You may well have to kill what's in there, though, and remake the lake.
Draining or killing out something that big doesn't sound like an option. It's a pit, so probably would have to be pumped. 228 acres is a lot of pumping. Water table is likely high there, probably emptying not possible. It's big enough for any warm water freshwater species, including crappie. It probably needs to have a fish survey done.
How old is it? Do you know of any fish in either of the 3 ponds? You could have two nice grow outs to stock the large pond if that's what you're after.
Fish will find it's way into the pond with or without you stocking it.
Posted By: RAH Re: Buying property w 228 Acre former gravel pit - 12/22/18 11:07 AM
Fishless lakes:

https://video.ket.org/video/maine-watch-with-jennifer-rooks-fishless-lakes-in-maine/
Not sure about your area but here we have several old gravel pits and some still in use. I'm really familiar with 2 large ones and have known the family that started them for over 40 years. Here they pump gravel down to about 50 feet and I doubt any of them were ever stocked. I know the 2 weren't but they have lots of fish. A lot of nice Crappie are caught in the spring and there are some big catfish and LMB up to about 5 pound are common. Biggest I ever saw was 8 pound. Oddly enough, BG of any size range are few. Maybe the bass eat the crappie. Virtually no vegetation and clear water. I've never seen schools of minnows, just 2 or 3 at a time near the shore. I suspect nearly all get eaten in the clear water. However, the larger fish all look to be in good shape.
The advice of good lawyers will help you.
The advice of good lawyers will help you. For everything to be following the law, you should conduct an environmental assessment and then contact a company that will take care of your property's problems. It is better if professionals do it, it will be easier and faster. I can recommend one company that deals with land issues https://waymanandlong.co.uk/new-services/property-law/conveyancing-prices/. The company has competent people who will help you do everything legally. My father had an experience with them, and he needed to sell an old piece of land. They helped him with everything, after which he was satisfied and spoke very highly of them. It's good to have specialists in their field to whom you can safely address any issue.
I have a similar experience but my pit has nowhere near the surface area but is much deeper.

The first thing you need to do is get a copy of the "Reclamation Plan" from the state natural resource board. Unless this pit was closed prior to about 1980, who ever dug the pit is required to file one with the state. Even if the pit was dug prior to '80, If it was operational, a retro plan was filed.

The Reclamation Plan details the remediation the mining contractor is to perform, returning the land close to original state. Almost always they are required to keep top soils on site, then when the mining is complete, return the top soil to the property where applicable.

Only when the Reclamation Plan is completed to the states satisfaction, is the contractor released from further remediation obligations.

If you purchase the property prior to completion of the Reclamation Plan, you will be responsible to complete it. Or...

I arranged for the mining company to be a zero dollar leasee until the plan was completed. Once the plan was completed to the state and MY satisfaction, he is released from the lease.
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