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Thread Like Summary
anthropic, gehajake
Total Likes: 8
Original Post (Thread Starter)
by RossC
RossC
I'm looking for contractors that can lime a lake (from a boat or barge) in east Texas. 50 acre lake, probably 50 tons or more lime. We have used Lochow in the past. I would like to have more than one bid. Please respond if you know someone. Also, anyone doing your own water testing, what kit are you using?
Liked Replies
by ewest
ewest
Yes, dumping in the lake arms will help but is much less effective. You can use a jon boat with 2x4 and plywood to transport to the open water and dump. Also, can hire or DYS with a pontoon boat.


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2 members like this
by gehajake
gehajake
Yes, I have built a rough trail to drive to two of the arms reasonably easy with a machine, be a pretty long trip to bucket it in there with a machine, from the closest point I can get a dump truck to. but then that's no hill for a climber. The third arm will need a little more persuasion to get to but Ive got the equipment to do it, with a couple track-loaders, track-hoe, skid-loaders and tractor I can get it there no problem.
At least thats what Im going to try, see if it works, want to get the lime to a drop off point that I can get to with a truck while its dry enough to get off the road, then work it in this fall and winter when I get a little time. let the spring rains and snow thaws wash it down into the pond.
1 member likes this
by RossC
RossC
I talked to our local ag supply company. Liquid lime is what they recommend. 275 gallon tote (calcium carbonate) is equivalent to 110 tons. Application is with a sprayer. Texas A&M says it is recommended the same as crushed limestone. $4165 for 110 tons is 1/3 the cost.
https://aquaplant.tamu.edu/files/2022/02/liming-your-pond-to-improve-the-fishery.pdf
1 member likes this
by RossC
RossC
A little additional information. At least one individual that has done commercial liming reports that the lime from southeastern Oklahoma is about 30% as efficient as the superfine stuff from Georgetown, TX. Factor that in when you do the cost trade off. 3 times as much to haul and 3 times as muich to spread for the same kick.
1 member likes this
by RossC
RossC
Near as I can determine, liquid calcium carbonate hits quickly because it is effectively pre-dissolved. It can take crushed limestone up to 6 months to dissolve. The liquid will not have as long lasting an effect because there isn't as much real material present. You get a fast but short lived adjustment. It's ok for one season row crops but not what I want in a lake.

For east Texas lake managers, we can get crushed limestone out of Idabel and Hugo, OK. The price is $6 a ton. Hauling it to Tyler is $36-40 a ton. So less than 1/2 my quote. It's not the "super fine" that comes out of Georgetown, TX, but 3/16" and smaller. Loads are 25 tons per truck. I didn't ask about smaller loads.
1 member likes this
by esshup
esshup
Isn't the finest lime the pelletized lime (vs the powdered lime)
1 member likes this
by FireIsHot
FireIsHot
Originally Posted by esshup
Originally Posted by gehajake
Originally Posted by esshup
Isn't the finest lime the pelletized lime (vs the powdered lime)

Right, I was of the opinion that is a fine powder formed into a pellet but I may be wrong.

That's what I was told too. For plants, I was told to use the pelletized lime if there were plants in the ground, the powder if it was bare dirt.

One of the issues when spreading lime from a stationery position, like a pond bank, is that the lime powder can form a dome in the spreader bed if high humidity or rain causes the powdered lime to cake. It doesn't matter in pastures because the trucks are constantly bouncing around. I've spread lime and gypsum, and they both seem to have a good bit of powder along with the pellets.
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