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azteca, DonoBBD, DrLuke, ewest, FishinRod, John Kruid, jpsdad, Perch Pond, SetterGuy, Stressless
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Original Post (Thread Starter)
#542157 12/11/2021 10:26 PM
by Perch Pond
Perch Pond
I've been in the shadows of this forum for a couple years now trying to gain knowledge and experience with what I have going on. I'm located in southeast Iowa and long story short, I am trying to accomplish/establish a yellow perch pond for strictly fun fishing. Yellow perch isn't a huge fish species for southern IA, although a few lakes do have them within an hour of home here, so I knew it was possible. I have read everything on here about yellow perch that I could find, and re read again. I have a pond that I know has never been stocked with anything/anyone. (Excited for NO LMB) Finally a chance at successfully raising perch perhaps? Built roughly 10 years ago. I have checked depth and fish specie. Green sunfish is the only fish present in the pond, and that usually happens naturally, I understand. The pond is just an acre or better. Depth gets to 16 feet at deeper spots. Typical Iowa farm pond elsewise. It's also exciting me that this pond doesn't have trees by it yet,(maybe some shade trees would be beneficial) and also the farming practice around the perimeter , since it was built, has been CRP. With all these seemingly positive things, I decided, its time to try my yellow perch project. I obtained roughly 300 probably 5-8 inch perch and successfully released them last winter, and then this spring I released 100, 3-5 inchers.(Those may not make it?) I did go back after ice out and was able to catch a handful of the yellow perch, the 5-8 inchers, which I was excited about. Any discussion or professional help from here on out would be appreciated. I did try and supplemental feed once the summer warming took place, the feed that's recommended on here, but the feeder didn't work correctly. Need to invest more on that deal. Next I will put twiggy trees in before possible spawn this spring. I am so excited to drill some holes if we get good enough ice(we did last winter) and see what I have going on. Any guesses. Hopefully I've given enough info to trigger someone on this. I am beyond obsessed with this pond perch project, so anything would be appreciated. I've heard without predators they repopulate like crazy/stunt. If this predator-less pond has that go on, should I be ok with that?... as I would love to trap as many little ones as I could to stock another pond or two perhaps. I can also add predators at anytime. Hybrid striped bass I can get my hands on.

Appreciate it,

Brett
Liked Replies
#556699 Mar 25th a 01:38 AM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
PPond asks " Will most all the males naturally stick with the females and be there to milt and do their thing for the female eggs that are strewn in the shallows with that much water present for them? " If you stocked a bunch of pregnant and fat, female YP along with mature males into 50 or more acres of water how many would it take to have a sustained pop?"
Yellow perch are group or school oriented fish. They usually relate nearby to each other. Usually for best egg fertilization and during a normal YP spawning event, often up to 8-10 or more eager males will trail along side of a swimming female that is extruding the egg ribbon or skein. As the ribbon moves out of the traveling female's body the males are providing milt to hopefully coat the ribbon in a cloud of white milt. Too few males results in a small and less dense cloud of milt and fewer eggs get fertilized. Thus some extruded ribbons can have varying degrees of percent fertilized eggs depending on how many attending males were present. I have seen some YP ribbons have 20% to up to 50% eggs not fertilized. Different eggs in each ribbon can have milt from different male perch, thus a ribbon can be fertilized with DNA from several males and the ribbon does not have just one set of genetic material from one male perch.

This whole perch spawning process is quite a bit different technique than the way sunfishes and bass spawn as with paired individuals creating a real high percentage of fertilization of each egg drop.

2nd Question; "If you stocked a bunch of pregnant and fat, female YP along with mature males into 50 or more acres of water how many would it take to have a sustained pop?" Well it all depends. What is the goal of stocking the YP? Bonus fish? See if any can survive in that water body? Provide more forage fish? Create a good catch rate that equaled the BG and BCP? A mixed bag of panfish as harvest? Numerous options are present.

One of the major limiting factors is - Is the habitat right for yellow perch and does the habitat promote survival of YP to harvestable sizes.

Second factor - will the competition factor for food and space be adequate for all size classes of YP to survive using the available food sources. Is there an excess for the new YP? Does the lake have enough food available to sustain a third panfish species? . Are the current panfish populations and the lake's carrying capacity of BG&BCP allowing enough food resources to be present for new individuals of YP.? I question if the niche requirement of YP will fit into the current carrying capacity of the 50 ac example lake's ecosystem. You don't just dump fish on top of a current full fish community or ecosystem and expect the new fish to THRIVE. Usually an established current ecosystem is at carrying capacity with current standing stock. Often if there was available growing space or room available,,, the existing fish would have already occupied this 'space'. There needs to be an unfilled niche for ANY new specie to really succeed.

Third factors are - Predation pressure, predator size class structure, and predator density in relation to habitat type and density. If the lake has LMB and walleye(WE). Both LMB & WE in my opinion do prefer to eat slender, relatively slow moving moving, more close to the bottom oriented fish, such as YP compared to eating can lid shaped BG & BCP who usually tend to live higher in the water column. If the lake has just LMB then predation would occur at just one "level". LMB and WE favor eating bottom and shallow oriented fish where all YP thrive or have a niche. IMO and experience,,,, LMB tend to be primarily day time active predators whereas WE are usually low light and evening / dark oriented predators - thus their big glassy eyes. YP are day active and vulnerable to LMB pressure. YP rest on bottom at night and are very vulnerable to WE predation. Thus with good populations of both LMB & WE, YP are attacked 24hrs a day - i.e. intense predator pressure. Will the current predators find it easier and more convenient to prey on offspring of the new YP compared to the other available forage items of can small lid BG&BCP? Forage density, predator sizes, their density, and amount or proper HABITAT / COVER are all important factors for YP survival with LMB and or WE. Lots of cover, often as submerged weed beds and maybe habitat diversity , IMO need to be present to allow enough YP to survive, reproduce, and grow to harvestable sizes.

Stocking Density - general rule is the more and larger ones that are stocked the better the chance some will survive. However many YP that you stock, IMO an equal number of similar sized other panfish species should be removed. Do it to make room for the new mouths to feed on a now increased amount of available uneaten natural foods.

IMO if lake conditions are conducive to YP survival stocking,,,, 10 to 20 mixed mature sizes ((5"-8"+) of YP per acre will allow you to see if survival in the lake is possible. Also in the right conditions stocking 5-10 YP as mature adults pre acre might allow a YP spawn their first spring. Another stocking option would be to add or stock YP egg ribbons or skeins into the lake's good habitat area. Proper Habitat then determines survival rate of hatchlings. YP can be prolific. The key amount to stock is to add enough for a YP spawn to occur before the stockers are eaten or die. Survival and growth of offspring will become evident in years 2 and 3 after initial stocking. IMO I don't think electroshocking is a good way to accurately sample and monitor YP populations because YP are bottom oriented, often in deeper water and electro-fishing does best when fish are up off the bottom in more littoral areas. YP IMO can be effectively sampled in large water bodies with fyke nets, gill nets and panfish angling in appropriate littoral areas and at appropriate times.
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#554332 Dec 15th a 09:59 PM
by SetterGuy
SetterGuy
Perch Pond, I really hope you are successful in getting good numbers of nice sized YP in your pond. My pond is just south of you in NE Missouri. If I had to do it all over again, I’d just have YP, and not much else. We love to catch and eat them. I just can’t keep them going. Every year I have fewer and fewer egg ribbons. And fewer and fewer edible sized YP. Years ago I foolishly thought I was going to have a great YP pond. I kept and ate many. (Probably a few too many females were consumed.)
We don’t catch very many any more, and the ones we catch are pretty small.
I stocked a few HBG, they and my RES have really multiplied. I’m guessing they hurt the YP fry. I’ve got American Pond Weed coming on in the last few years. Maybe that’ll help my YP. I stocked more YP a few years ago. Still trying.
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#554338 Dec 16th a 03:12 AM
by esshup
esshup
Jeff, make sure you have YP spawning habitat in the pond. Their egg skeins don't do so well if they are laying on the bottom. They need to be up off the bottom so water can circulate all around them. Then once the eggs hatch, the fry and fingerlings need dense cover to hide in to avoid predation.
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#554865 Jan 11th a 05:43 PM
by esshup
esshup
Originally Posted by SetterGuy
Originally Posted by esshup
Jeff, make sure you have YP spawning habitat in the pond. Their egg skeins don't do so well if they are laying on the bottom. They need to be up off the bottom so water can circulate all around them. Then once the eggs hatch, the fry and fingerlings need dense cover to hide in to avoid predation.

Lots of branches and American Pond Weed around the edges. We just see fewer and fewer ribbons every year. I restocked some small YP a few years ago, we are catching a few of them. Not keeping any.


Toss a bunch of Christmas trees in there so the tops of them (when they are laying over) are in 2'-5' of water. The American Pond Weed and regular tree branches won't do much for their success in spawning, they need denser material so the skein isn't all clumped up gets water movement around it.
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#555025 Jan 18th a 01:14 AM
by canyoncreek
canyoncreek
never hurts to try. My YP also prefer the layer of oak leaves in SUPER shallow water (8-10") perhaps due to it warming up the quickest there? The first strands are always on the leaf covered areas and in the shallow/warm corner. I then usually see them show up next around little snags sticking up, like stiff reeds or sedges, or will even find crannies or pockets in artificial structure that is left in the pond. IT seems they prefer to lay eggs in all these other places and conditions rather than drape them over the branches that I leave out. Some branches certainly attract egg strands. Maybe I need DENSE branches like Christmas trees?

For fun, maybe take 2 or 3 old 5 gallon buckets and bore various size holes (or square openings) in the sides (maybe a 3" 5" and then 8-10" hole) FWhen planning holes, figure on laying the buckets on their side so plan holes on opposite long sides at different heights in the water column. Throw a rock in there to hold the bucket in place, put them in different spots and depths and see how many of the openings end up with egg strand draped through it.

You could use a 'Christmas Tree Bit' to woller out the holes or use a battery powered angle grinder to make square or triangle shaped holes. For fun leave some saw tooth shapes on the bottom edge of the opening to see if having something for the YP to hook the egg strand on to help pull it out is really what draw them. See if the eggs are on the holes with the sawtooth edges vs the smooth edges.

My theory is that the brush helps them get some traction on the strand and get it elongated and draped out. It seems having a pivot or tether point on the egg strand is what I see as a common theme in my pond. I'm probably all wet, but it just an observation.
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#564001 Feb 1st a 03:22 AM
by Perch Pond
Perch Pond
Through drought last summer I finally made it to the perch pond this last weekend. Caught 11 nice sized keeper perch and many differing sizes of yp as well. The pumpkinseed population has blown up and I now have numerous(too many) of them instead of the green sunfish. Decent tradeoff. LMB have spawned which I'm not sure I wanted, but they are yet to show any significant predation on either of the 2 desired species in the yp and pumpkins. I need them to do more work as it stands now with the over abundant pumpkins and likely yp. I think the weed edge saves a lot of the new recruitment. Pleased to see the size of the bigger ones. One more year and I could be dealing with some true trophies in a pond here in Southern IA. Thanks for your help pond boss forums.
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#542169 Dec 12th a 07:25 AM
by esshup
esshup
Here's the reason why I said Rotenone. I know it's only one pond, but that is one pond that I don't want to have a repeat of.

A absentee landowner customer had a pond dug in a damp area of the woods. 1 ac, supposed to be 12' deep. Wanted a SMB/YP/RES pond. Didn't want to stock a lot of fish, so he only OK'd stocking 50% of what I recommended (FHM, Golden Shiners, Yellow Perch and Redear Sunfish) Fast forward 2 years when it was time to stock the SMB, he noticed fish chasing other fish in the shallows. I got called, went there and caught two 14" LMB. I KNOW I didn't stock any LMB, and we couldn't tell if any more were in there so he said kill it and we will start over.

I drained about 50% of the pond, then applied the rotenone. There were 1,000's of GSF, no fatheads, only adult Golden Shiners, only adult YP, only adult RES. There was absolutely no surviving reproduction in the pond at all except for GSF. I figure that there were GSF in the puddle in the woods that they turned into the pond because the woods floods and the ditch nearby has GSF in it.

No other LMB were in the pond, and this state has a 14" minimum size for keeping LMB from public waters. I figure some were caught from a local lake and bucket stocked in there because there was no sign of ANY fish chasing forage fish in shallow water before.

When the pond was dug, the spoils were distributed around the pond so no surface water could run into the pond - it is a groundwater pond.

That's why I say kill all the GSF and then stock.
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#554131 Dec 9th a 04:00 PM
by Perch Pond
Perch Pond
Thank you, Bill Cody, esshup, and Snipe.
I will try and get a photo or two up of the pumpkinseeds. I did purchase a fish trap that's quite large, and that was pretty successful in trapping all sizes of the GSF. I also used some of the budget friendly fish traps that

worked ok at catching them as well. Was able to catch 15+ at a time in the cheaper traps, and 30+ in the large trap. That's good information on about how much the 9 bass that were stocked will be able to eat in a years'

time. I do plan to do some more stocking of yellow perch and hoping I can get my hands on numerous 7+ inch YP in doing so. We will have to see what happens with the LMB introduction as far as sex. I knew it was a

50/50 chance. Bottom line, the pond needed LMB added, as they're the proven technique to get rid of GSF. Having the capability to accurately sex the LMB would've been very beneficial. I do plan to check ratio's and if I

can ever get those in check with YP as the end goal, I will then start trying to cull the bass if it makes sense to at that point, which I could foresee being the biggest challenge yet. I am aware of what the presence of LMB

does to a pond with YP in it, so the sooner I can limit the bass population, the better off I will be. I am understanding I am on a road, and a long one at that, most likely, in trying to turn this pond around for a trophy YP pond.

I still have hope and will keep monitoring and trying. I'd be curious to hear about a fresh pond, fresh start, on a mostly successful YP pond, and what problems occurred that needed fixing within the fishery as time went on.

Someday I will start from scratch, with a fresh body of pond water!
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#554144 Dec 9th a 10:54 PM
by John Kruid
John Kruid
Great update, I'm still working on getting YP established in my pond. I believe this is year 3 since my first fall stocking. My pond is close to 3 acres. It has bluegill, LMB,BCP, and CC. I stocked 300 7-9 inch YP.The first spring I saw eggs everywhere. That summer I caught a few YP while crappie fishing. last year was a tough year so I didn't do much fishing in the pond and I never caught any. I also didn't notice any eggs this Spring. I stocked 300 more 7-9 inchers in October of this year. Over that time we have removed every bass caught over 7 inches and IM still working on removing all CC as I believe they are my main YP predators. I too am seeking a successful YP pond.
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#554150 Dec 10th a 02:30 AM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
Growing yellow perch in a pond with largemouth bass is a BIG CHALLENGE. With also channel catfish makes it an even bigger challenge.
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#553954 Dec 3rd a 08:15 PM
by Snipe
Snipe
+1 on the sexing via the catheter tube. any other method is a 50/50 shot
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#553876 Dec 1st a 02:30 AM
by esshup
esshup
Ditto what Bill said about the update. Here's praying that you were successful in only stocking Male LMB. The only way I know to reliably figure out the sex of LMB is to use a catheter prior to them spawning.
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#553874 Dec 1st a 02:23 AM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
Thanks for taking time for returning with a pond update.

Are you able to post a nice close side picture of your pumpkinseed sunfish? Put the picture on a server and then just add the link to it here on a post.

Keep trapping the GSF on a weekly basis. They will readily enter wire mesh traps placed near shore with no bait. I like Gee Minnow traps best. I removed about 3000 small GSF in a small pond this open water season using 3 - 4 minnow traps with no bait. Trap openings can be enlarged for catching slightly larger GSF.

The 9 LMB will eat a lot of fish and a big percent of them will be GSF because the two species have similar niches. Your 9 LMB should be able to eat around 2500-3000 small fish per year. Hopefully most of them will be GSF.
To maintain decent numbers of YP with those bass you will have to regularly add some 7" long YP each year. The LMB will likely eat most all the yearling YP that are produced each year. The more 7" YP you can add the better the fishing for YP will be.
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#554161 Dec 10th a 04:04 PM
by FishinRod
FishinRod
John,

That sounds like you had an awesome LMB pond by Kansas standards once you started managing your bass population.

However, I suspect it would be extremely difficult for YP that hatched in your pond to make it past the crappie and BG predation, and then to grow to any significant size through the LMB and CC predation.

Is there any place on your property that you could build a small grow-out pond?

If you had such a pond, you could put in YP forage and then add YP that you pellet feed. When they are large enough, drain and seine the pond and transfer your YP to the main pond. Hold back a few breeding pairs of YP, and let them fill your grow-out pond again for the next cycle.
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#554194 Dec 11th a 09:39 PM
by Perch Pond
Perch Pond
The Mississippi River pools between lock and dam 7 and dam 8 is the stretch I fished on and mainly referring to in having the trophy YP fishery. Whatever has happened with managing that fishery and the river itself, it

worked tremendously well. Some true giants in there and love the coloration on those healthy-looking fish. Makes you dream pretty big of creating your own mini opportunity at fish like that, at least it did me! I kind of

freelanced by myself for a few days and caught a few fish on the ice, then the last day I had an opportunity at an airboat ride out where the general public cannot reach on the river. That was a day I'll never forget perch

fishing. The morning at sunup was hottest bite, then slowly tapered off during day, but managed to pick them here and there and that is usually the common consensus on most public water perch fishing. There are a few

lakes in Iowa that have YP, but not much to show for actual trophy size YP however, at least on a semi consistent basis. Ice fishing Dec 15th- ice out would be a great time to target YP in public waters, because they're

more grouped together and more easily targeted I suppose. Don't have to be an expert fisherman by any means, just have to know where the perch are, and in unknown territories sometimes it pays to ask or even pay a

guide or someone that knows something, no shame in learning and spending a little bit in something I'm passionate about is how I justified anything when it came to finding the perch. Northeast Iowa, Decorah, Waukon,

and then just north of them into and near Lacrosse, Wisconsin and Minnesota is right there too! Beautiful bluff country and the streams are full of trout too near Decorah, IA! Hope this helps answer.
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#554187 Dec 11th a 05:39 PM
by FishinRod
FishinRod
John, I hope your plan comes to fruition.

If you design the upper pond such that it also serves to trap sediments, you should extend the life of your main pond.

That way, you would actually be SAVING money in the long run. (Think your wife will believe that one?)
1 member likes this
#554234 Dec 13th a 06:35 AM
by Snipe
Snipe
Forage availability will dictate most of that growth, with length of growing season also a factor.
Forage in ample amounts at the right sizes means best growth will occur with less competition.
WR of fish caught is a snapshot in time, but if you do it throughout the season, you will see a pattern emerge.
Fast growing Sunfish are commonly 140%-up WR (weight ratio), others here refer to RW-Relative weight-same alpha and beta are used in the equations. If you are interested in this, I can look up the charts, They are in the archives here. I also have the values to plug in to spread sheet for grams and mm, which-to me-is more accurate than ounces and inches.
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#554853 Jan 10th a 03:21 PM
by esshup
esshup
Beautifully colored fish! Congrats on the reproduction.
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#554855 Jan 10th a 04:04 PM
by Theo Gallus
Theo Gallus
Originally Posted by esshup
Beautifully colored fish!
B & W too.
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#554924 Jan 13th a 04:40 PM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
Larger YP in the pictures will be your original stockers and they are plump females carrying eggs. Smaller YP in pics are probably this year's crop or maybe males from 2021 hatch. Keep trapping the GSF especially prior to their onset of spawning of 59F. The more GSF females you can remove prior to spawning the better your chances of having better YP survival in 2023 and beyond.
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#554913 Jan 13th a 04:30 AM
by Sunil
Sunil
If we can agree that you're getting YP recruitment, then I'd keep doing what you're doing and try to intensify any aspects that you can. Maybe get more structure for YOY YP to hide in, increase GSF culling efforts, etc.
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#554884 Jan 12th a 02:58 AM
by Sunil
Sunil
"...smallest perch I stocked 2 years ago were 4-6 inch fish, so my thinking is these are proof of reproduction has taken

place."

The YP in your pictures that are in your hand seem to be 4-5" max if my hand is similar in size, so I would guess you've pulled off a YP spawn with some recruitment.

Regarding the GSF potentially eating all the YP fry, I think you'd have to be way overpopulated with GSF to get no recruitment from other fish species. The better cover you have for YOY, the better recruitment you'll get.
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#554861 Jan 11th a 01:53 PM
by SetterGuy
SetterGuy
Originally Posted by esshup
Jeff, make sure you have YP spawning habitat in the pond. Their egg skeins don't do so well if they are laying on the bottom. They need to be up off the bottom so water can circulate all around them. Then once the eggs hatch, the fry and fingerlings need dense cover to hide in to avoid predation.

Lots of branches and American Pond Weed around the edges. We just see fewer and fewer ribbons every year. I restocked some small YP a few years ago, we are catching a few of them. Not keeping any.
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#542166 Dec 12th a 02:25 AM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
I have always had trouble growing good eating size and later good numbers of YP with GSF. GSF are very predatory of all types of natural foods including small minnows needed by YP. GSF also eat lots of YP fry up to 1.2" long. YOY GSF seem to be good at avoiding predation from YP. They do not really live in the same areas or niches so they do not interact much,,,, so as a result YP do not eat lots of little GSF. Way too many GSF are able to survive with just YP as predators. I think the GSF will out compete the YP for foods and current YP will remain skinny. It is my experience GSF manage to eat lots of tiny and small YP. Your pond might be big enough and spacious enough for YP to manage to get decent annual recruitment that results in enough YP fry surviving to create a decent YP panfish pond. However I doubt that will happen because the GSF had a very high density head start before you added YP breeders. Now a mostly unknown fact....... GSF have the same mouth size as a LMB until the GSF is around 6" long. After 6" the LMB mouth starts growing more than that of the GSF. I did a GSF mouth size measurement study about this for a Pond Boss conference presentation topic. This means larger GSF of 3"-6" are aggressive and when abundant will eat a huge amount of perch fry until YP are 1.5" to maybe 2" long. GSF at all their body sizes will eat lots of little YP. In my ponds Little GSF 1"-3" decimate perch fry as they hatch from the egg up through swim-up sizes to 3/8" long. Larger GSF eat lots of 1/2"-3/4" YP plus lots of other invertebrate foods needed by small 1"-3" YP. Do you see the problems of your plan? The more GSF there are the worse this problem becomes.

The big unknown that I have is how well will HSB eat GSF. I don't think HSB will eat small GSF very well because GSF live mainly close to shore among rocks and cover and HSB live a lot in open water and will IMO eat many more small 2"-5" YP compared to them eating small GSF. If you add LMB they will eat lots of GSF and YP. When and if the GSF numbers get minimized the LMB will focus on eating YP and eventually keep them from recruiting new YP. The amount of habitat and type of habitat might be a variable in your favor and your goal for producing some decent YP - but I doubt it. When your stocked YP die of old age in several years the YP population will be basically done / gone unless you keep stocking more adult YP. I hope you can prove me wrong. I consider those damn green sunfish pests.

Since you have already twice stocked YP into the pond, your next management objective I think should be to use fish traps, or seining or frequent small bait angling to try and determine if the 2"-4" YP are becoming a noticeable part of the fishery. If yes This means YP are able to recruit YP with the current population structure of GSF in the pond. Whatever happens going forward,, PLEASE return to this thread and tell us how your pond fishery is progressing. We all can learn from your results regardless of the results. We are all here to learn.
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#555166 Jan 24th a 08:07 PM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
Those will be good egg hatching areas for YP ribbons. They will float to shore when the ice melts which is good because the water is warmer there during spring YP spawn. If fry have a good survival percentage you should have a good year class in 2023. If not, something ate the fry or zooplankton was not abundant enough to feed lots of fry. Ice and water clarity look good so suspended silt should not be a problem for egg hatching.

You have LMB in the pond? Since I see you have green sunfish in the pond, trap as many as possible as soon as the water gets above 40F. Even 1" GSF love eating YP fry.
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#555180 Jan 26th a 01:21 AM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
Your anchored brush for YP egg laying could easily be too far offshore for you to see the egg ribbons. My water is pretty clear and i place all my bush for ribbon collection with bottom butts on the bank so majority of the brush is in 6" to 2 ft of water depth so I can find and remove egg ribbons. YP will readily come into shoreline water to lay the eggs. IMO your brush will collect egg ribbons it is just you may not see very many of them due to depth and deeply placed ribbons.

After the LMB spawn in the pond the high numbers of fingerling and juvenile bass will eat very high numbers of the 1" to 4" YP before they grow to the 8" harvest size. Larger bass of 13"-15" will be eating 5"-7" YP. Young GSF will prey heavily on the YP fry. Don't be surprised if you don't catch very many 9"-10" YP in 4 years. Hopefully the amount of habitat as brush and some weed beds will provide enough refuge cover to grow you some YP for tasty fish fillet meals.
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#555188 Jan 26th a 05:08 PM
by esshup
esshup
Unless you used a catheter on the LMB during spawning season there is no way to positively tell if the LMB are male or female. (Well, a DNA test would tell you too, but that costs more $$) If they DO pull off a spawn in the pond, then all bets are off.
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#555186 Jan 26th a 04:52 PM
by ewest
ewest
PS will have the same effect as BG (other than high recruitment numbers). That is PS will eat very small YP and YP will eat small PS.
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#555192 Jan 27th a 03:17 AM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
Trying to catch 9 previously angler jaw jerked LMB will TRULY TEST your angler ability. Do some serious intense finesse fishing before the LMB spawn. If you can manage to catch all 9 LMB you could be on the Bass Pro angler circuit. By all means return and let us know how the bass removal goes this spring. This will be educational. One remaining bass will be okay in the YP pond. I have one customer with all perch and he uses harvest and 1 LMB to help control numbers of YP. Works very good for him.

PS will eat some YP fry but NOT nearly as many of small YP as the GSF. Plus in my experience PS are not as prolific as GSF. GSF are truly a PEST for most pond fisheries. I would also remove small PS until you know you have good spawns of YP. Then use numerous PS to help control numbers of fry and small YP. Annual small fish trapping will be a primary management effort as long as you have GSF in the pond.
1 member likes this
#555193 Jan 27th a 03:11 PM
by Perch Pond
Perch Pond
I'm laughing a little at this, but in all honesty, it will be difficult to catch the bass back out of the pond, no doubt, and I will probably go down swinging. However, I do believe they have helped in ridding of numerous GSF, which has enabled for some target fishing/samplng of the YP. Without the help of the LMB, I wouldn't be where I am at now in the pond. Just a double edge sword in this case with the LMB. I just wish HSB were known to successfully be able to control the high, nuisance population of GSF as well as the LMB do, but no one could 100% prove this. It's just we all known YP and LMB will not work, period. That was my thought too, exactly, Bill Cody on the pumpkinseeds within the pond. Removal of LMB and small PS, and of course the GSF. Anything for the YP...do the YP really deserve this much consideration and effort? Yes!
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#556702 Mar 25th a 03:33 AM
by Perch Pond
Perch Pond
I feel very fortunate with such a response, thank you Bill Cody. I do know of one lake with WE present, as well as LMB, BG, and BC. Said like is 600+ acres. It must have certain habitat/cover for the YP to remain sustained. As for trophy size, it most definitely struggles, except one year was real good, but I believe heavy angling and the trophies drew enough crowd that it couldn't withstand it, as far as trophy YP. Very interesting with a 600 acre body of water. I appreciate this understanding and am just wanting to learn, and in turn and ultimately apply to pond YP. Hope others take something from this as well...I think they will.
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#555200 Jan 28th a 02:27 AM
by Bill Cody
Bill Cody
Since I have lots of education in aquatic biology, all the locals call me the Pond Doctor. Thus as a side business, I help lots of locals manage their ponds. I have a long resume of my main business. Currently I routinely in the summer usually weekly identify algae for numerous OH and IN municipal water reservoir treatment plants and companies doing environmental surveys. I currently work with the local university for their algae projects and studies. This past year the university had me identifying algae from Lake Victoria, Africa. Lake V is a big one and is larger than each of the Great Lakes except Lk Superior. Previously have helped several other universities and Academy of Natural Sciences Phila.PA for algae studies. Also presently I am doing a long term study involving identifications of zooplakton, phytoplankton and attached algae aka periphyton from the Kootenai River Idaho. Other projects have involved identifications of all the Orders of benthic invertebrates and larval fishes. I stay busy!
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