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#493866 - 07/17/18 06:05 PM Re: Lilly Pads [Re: Tbar]
FireIsHot Offline
Moderator


Registered: 02/28/11
Posts: 3965
Loc: Emory TX
RAH, are you going to let the seed heads open up? We're still getting popups all over the pond a year after all the lotus was gone.
_________________________
AL

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#493868 - 07/17/18 06:37 PM Re: Lilly Pads [Re: TGW1]
FireIsHot Offline
Moderator


Registered: 02/28/11
Posts: 3965
Loc: Emory TX
Originally Posted By: TGW1
Al, you once mentioned a place where you shopped for these type of ornamental plants. I think it was located in the DFW area. Did you purchase some there and how did that turn out? Would you do it again? And if so, which have performed the best? Easy to control, color etc? Lessons learned? Hope I am not putting in a bad spot here. I know "it depends" on a lot of things when it comes to growing these types of plants in one's pond.


Tracy, I bought my lilies from Creative Water Gardens in Garland. They cost a little more, but they're potted and actively growing, so you can see the leaf size and flower colors. But, be careful with places that sell plants for koi or aquarium plants. They are easy to manage in water like that, but not so much when they're unrestrained.

I couldn't comfortably recommend a variety, but here's a few pics of mine with, and the time they're been in the pond.

These are 3 one year old lilies that were originally potted . I almost always pot my lilies for 2 reasons. One, if you plant them to move to another BOW, there is the potential for invasives to be moved with them. I thoroughly rinse and hand inspect the entire plant for freeloaders, and potting the plant keeps the plant handy for inspection down the road. Also, I move lilies to deeper water when we get water drops. It can be hard to plant lilies in water 4' deep, but it is easy to plant them when that same water is 1' deep in the summer. These are on the shoreline right now, but the were 2' down when I actually planted them.



These are some peach Colorado lilies that have been in the pond for 6-7 years. These haven't been aggressive spreaders, but I'm starting to see them pop up at various areas around the pond.

If you look above the peach lilies, you can see a large patch above these. These lilies are probably 100 to 150' from the shore, and are in 4-5' of water when the pond's at full pool. The LMB love this batch.


This pic of the original batch of lilies that were planted 8-10 years ago. These lilies have survived the drought years, and never failed to come back, even after being above the water line for several months. These are colored like RAH's, but I'm not sure they're the same. This area at the dam traps the lilies on 3 of the 4 sides, and so I think the spread is pretty well confined to the north bank at this point.





Attachments
IMG_4712_Dam_800.jpg (432 downloads)
IMG_4689_Peach_800.jpg (361 downloads)
IMG_4717_CarpFence_800.jpg (434 downloads)



Edited by FireIsHot (07/17/18 06:59 PM)
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AL

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#493871 - 07/17/18 07:29 PM Re: Lilly Pads [Re: FireIsHot]
RAH Offline
Lunker

Registered: 05/17/09
Posts: 4283
Loc: Indiana, Boone County, 25 mile...
The lotus will be left to seed. I am more tolerant of water plants than many seem to be. This pond has a bottom drain, so if I really hate my "experiment", then I can end it. I will drop the cable to the bottom valve this summer as the pond seems to be very tight. Will take a diver to reopen.

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#493886 - 07/18/18 07:25 AM Re: Lilly Pads [Re: Tbar]
TGW1 Offline


Registered: 09/19/14
Posts: 2646
Loc: Harrison Co. Texas
Al, NICE! I can't say enough for all the information that you and other PBF Mods and Owners do here. The information on the lilies, I don't think it could be topped by anyone when talking of their experience about Texas Ponds. Not to mention the other stuff you have contributed. I will also have to mention highflyer, who may not be a forum mod today but seems to be the Go To Guy for solar pond stuff. Heck, Just look at what all he did to assist in Colorado for a forum member here. Many other members contribute here and to the PB Mag also. And I herd it said, there is only so much one can talk of ponds. But I find I am still full of questions, new ones seem to come up each new year and this 4th year I need some plants that will provide cover and reduce excess nutrients. I need a kick start. Where are the native plants that were to just pop up on their own? Haha, no ponds are alike, lol.


One question is in the pic of the isolated Peach lilies 100+ feet out from the shoreline, did they take hold and spread on their own or was that a planting? And do you spray to control these lilies?
_________________________
Do not judge me by the politicians in my City, State or Federal Government.
Thank The Good Lord the government in Washington DC gets little done.
Outlawing guns will make a lot of us down here in the South
Outlaws and proud of it

Tracy

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#493889 - 07/18/18 08:43 AM Re: Lilly Pads [Re: Tbar]
RAH Offline
Lunker

Registered: 05/17/09
Posts: 4283
Loc: Indiana, Boone County, 25 mile...
Another unexpected observation is how the water lilies thriving in my 3 fish ponds have struggled and not spread in my 2 "duck ponds" over the last decade. These shallow (<5 ft max) ponds were originally designed to be shallower wetlands, but were dug deeper based on DNR and FWS folks saying the ground would not hold water after taking soil core samples (have become more confident in my own judgement of the my land). A third emergent wetland in another field (about 3' max) has the same lilies spreading very well. One difference is that the lilies in the duck ponds may have greater muskrat pressure, but they just never look as robust in these ponds, even when muskrats are all trapped out. These duck ponds are almost exclusively fed by springs and could have water chemistry that the lilies don't like. Most of my other pond plants have done fine in these duck ponds though. Just wanted to share this observation.

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#493914 - 07/18/18 04:48 PM Re: Lilly Pads [Re: Tbar]
FireIsHot Offline
Moderator


Registered: 02/28/11
Posts: 3965
Loc: Emory TX
Tracy, that area where the offshore lilies are growing is on a big flat. Before all the rain we've gotten over the last 4 years, we used to walk out there and fish so it was easy to plant them, but it was just a shot in the dark to see if they grew. It'll be interesting to see how big that batch gets with no limiting factors other than rain.

I haven't tried to control any lilies yet. If I do need to trim them back, I'd probably do it in the fall, and just use a weed razor to cut the stems off near the bottom. Just a guess, but I would think that the tubers would need to be cut to properly treat just a section of the lilies. Maybe a drag with a blade on the bottom using a tractor or truck to pull it back to the bank? Now you've got me thinking.
_________________________
AL

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#500298 - 01/03/19 04:23 PM Re: Lilly Pads [Re: Tbar]
Pleasantvalley Offline


Registered: 01/03/19
Posts: 3
Loc: Maryland
Be very careful with lotus. They can be quite hard to control and itís quite possible they will survive fully draining a pond. They will take over, and are quite capable of chokin. Out a whole pond in a short time. The tubers grow laterally around 8-14Ē below the pond bottom.

As to water lily, there are two root growth types among hardy Lilyís. Some grow laterally and some grow in a cluster. The cluster root tend to be smaller, and are easier to keep from spreading out. The lateral root are known to spread over wide areas and have more spaced out pads, and typically are larger all around. Planting either in pots is a great way to do it. You just have to pull the pots up every year or two and divide out some of the roots to keep them healthy. Personally I find Colorado, Sioux, and chrysanthia to be quite nice, easy to keep, and easy to propagate. If you want to cover water surface fast, look no further than oderata gigantea. Lilypons water gardens in Adamstown MD does mail order and has a ton of varieties.

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