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#456373 - 09/22/16 12:57 PM Re: 100% Green Sunfish [Re: ewest]
snrub Offline


Registered: 10/05/13
Posts: 4293
Loc: SE Kansas
You got that right ewest.

For me anything under a couple inches is very hard. Over two inches and the GSF shape and mouth size and green cheek bars start making them easier to tell. With RES they have to get up to about 3" before it starts become evident for me. At least evident enough I would feel safe stocking them in a specific pond for a specific species.

Add in hybridization and it gets even more tricky.

Even at those sizes I would probably get some wrong. smirk

Throw in a species I'm not expecting to see in the pond (like Rock Bass, crappie, etc.) and then all bets are off.

Edit: Adding a link here to a thread about feeding GSF so I can find it later. What to feed GSF


Edited by snrub (04/30/17 12:42 AM)
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#483099 - 11/23/17 11:36 PM for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
snrub Offline


Registered: 10/05/13
Posts: 4293
Loc: SE Kansas
For all you GSF lovers out there (all two of you) here are a few pictures of some I caught today out of my main pond.

At the time of my fish kill in my sediment pond, I transferred thousands of small fingerling fish to my main pond before they died in the sediment pond. Among the CNBG and RES fingerlings were also quite a few GSF fingerlings. They have grown really well as you can see in the pictures, and all of these went to the holding pen, to be invited to supper, because I am catching more of them than I would like to see. If my LMB were recruiting well I would not worry about it. But since I lack a population of small LMB I do not want the GSF to get carried away in this pond.

The third fish I question if it is pure GSF or not. When I caught it I called it a hybrid. But seeing it in the picture it looks awfully green sunfishy. Caught them all within a few minutes, in the same area, in 7-8' deep water off the bottom. I guess I found the GSF honey hole. A year ago I was returning the few over 8" GSF I caught to maybe grow a few trophy size GSF. But I am catching too many, so these will find their way to the cleaning station.

If I knew how to sex the GSF, I could return only the males. As I understand it there is a lot less likelihood of a BG female laying eggs in a GSF male nest. The more normal cross in nature is a BG male and a GSF female. But I do not know what to look for in a GSF like I do in a BG. Any tips?


Attachments
20171123_154314.jpg (69 downloads)
Description: GSF #1

20171123_155253.jpg (63 downloads)
Description: GSF #2

20171123_160111.jpg (81 downloads)
Description: GSF or HBG???? Not sure but I think it is a hybrid with lots of GSF characteristics.




Edited by snrub (11/23/17 11:49 PM)
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#483103 - 11/24/17 07:40 AM Re: 100% Green Sunfish [Re: snrub]
Jim Wetzel Offline


Registered: 08/16/17
Posts: 291
Loc: Holts Summit, MO
Squeeze them for gametes. Will work this time of year.


Edited by Jim Wetzel (11/24/17 07:41 AM)
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#483104 - 11/24/17 07:43 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
sprkplug Offline
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I agree with your assessment of the third photo. Looks like some BG in there to me also.
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"Forget pounds and ounces, I'm figuring displacement!"

If we accept that: MBG(+)FGSF(=)HBG(F1)
And we surmise that: BG(>)HBG(F1) while GSF(<)HBG(F1)
Would it hold true that: HBG(F1)(+)AM500(x)q.d.(=)1.5lbGRWT?
PB answer: It depends.

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#483108 - 11/24/17 09:56 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: sprkplug]
snrub Offline


Registered: 10/05/13
Posts: 4293
Loc: SE Kansas
Thanks Jim. This pond fish stuff is pretty new to me. Only been messing with pond fish for less than 5 years, although I have been diving in the ocean and observing those fish for 40 years (started lake diving in 1968). For the last five years I have averaged right around 200 dives a year with lesser amounts going back in time when I actually had to work to make a living. So I spend a lot of time observing fish behavior, just not pond fish.

Thanks sprkplug for the confirmation. It is one of those things that when I caught it and snapped the picture I immediately called it HBG. Then I get to looking at the picture later that night and I question. A picture just does not have the three dimensional perspective as having a fish in your hands. I often don't see features stand out in pictures that I observe when I have the fish in hand.


Edited by snrub (11/24/17 10:01 AM)
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#483110 - 11/24/17 11:08 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
Bill Cody Offline
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IMO there is not much or a very few BG influence (genes) in the fish of the last picture that is a little out of focus. There is a noticeable genetic variation of each species if one looks closely at the individuals.
Notice the length of the pectoral fin. It extends to the same length as the pelvic fin. As BG influence increases in hybrids the pectoral fin elongates. Pectoral fin of pure strain BG goes back to the origin of the anal fin.
Another feature of the fish in the pictures is the length of the mouth. Ideally in pure green sunfish the posterior end of the upper jaw should extend well beyond the front of the eye, usually to the pupil.
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#483120 - 11/24/17 06:16 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
Jim Wetzel Offline


Registered: 08/16/17
Posts: 291
Loc: Holts Summit, MO
I agree with Bill Cody. Third fish looks female. Mouth / gape can very with Green Sunfish as a function of what the fish consumes as prey. Ewest can dig up peer reviewed paper to support that.


Care must be taken not to cherry pick fish for pictures. Overwhelming majority pictures of single sunfish I see posted appear to be male. We tend to use males more than females which can result in characterizing females being less reliable.
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#483122 - 11/24/17 09:11 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
ewest Offline
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I have some good info on lepomis plasticity which can result in significant differences in populations. Most is on BG and PS. Not a lot of published info on RES and GSF. Most on GSF is on hybridization.
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#483123 - 11/24/17 09:15 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: Jim Wetzel]
snrub Offline


Registered: 10/05/13
Posts: 4293
Loc: SE Kansas
Interesting. I filleted it today and one of the other GSF (wife got the second GSF) and I again thought it was a hybrid. But if it was a female and the other two males, that could have been what was throwing me off. At any rate, even if it was a hybrid, it surely was close enough to GSF to call it one.

I'll go with GSF then. Not sure how much more fishing I will do in the next couple weeks, but if I catch some more nice size GSF will post them.

An interesting tidbit of information. Kansas state record for both BG and GSF is 2# 5 oz. with HBG at 2# 10 oz. A 2# GSF would be a big GSF. Maybe these dudes get bigger than we normally associate them? Maybe they are usually just over populated and stunted populations? Or do you recon maybe someone mis-identified a 2# 5 oz HBG and called it a GSF?

Kansas sunfish fishing
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#483126 - 11/24/17 09:59 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
Jim Wetzel Offline


Registered: 08/16/17
Posts: 291
Loc: Holts Summit, MO
This pertains to Orange Spotted Sunfish
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1034/j.1600-0633.2001.100105.x/full

An old professor used to talk about a crappie stock in Crab Orchard Lake of southern Illinois that could split into two feeding guilds. One that grew fast switched to fish while a slower growing morph stayed on zooplankton. Looking at lots of crappie and even LMB suggests to me that the capacity for phenotypic plasticity is relatively widespread.

Somewhere I have seen where Green Sunfish in the absence of Bluegill becomes more planktivorous while in the absence of LMB it becomes more bass like.

The plasticity can involve morphology and / or behavior.
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#483132 - 11/24/17 11:39 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: Jim Wetzel]
snrub Offline


Registered: 10/05/13
Posts: 4293
Loc: SE Kansas
Now that article reminds me of what I see in RES. When I look at southern RES like from ewest area their snout reminds me of a hog snout. Elongated. Yet most of the RES of mine and the ones I see from Nebraska have faces more like BG without the elongated snout.

So that short article you linked to explains some things to me about why RES from areas away from me have a different look.
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#483135 - 11/25/17 07:47 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
Jim Wetzel Offline


Registered: 08/16/17
Posts: 291
Loc: Holts Summit, MO
Redear I snorkeled with in southern streams appear to eat a lot of hard-shelled mollusces. Those in northern lakes (ancestors came via hatcheries from same southern streams) are more Bluegill like and typically do not have anything tougher than Rams Horn Snails to eat seasonally. It is my guess that my location is north of where Redear would occur naturally without periodic infusions from stocked reservoirs.
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#483143 - 11/25/17 09:42 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
ewest Offline
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Registered: 03/08/05
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Here is a link to a previous thread on plasticity in sunfish , mostly.


http://forums.pondboss.com/ubbthreads.ph...true#Post450408
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#483145 - 11/25/17 09:51 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: Jim Wetzel]
snrub Offline


Registered: 10/05/13
Posts: 4293
Loc: SE Kansas
Originally Posted By: Jim Wetzel
Redear I snorkeled with in southern streams appear to eat a lot of hard-shelled mollusces. Those in northern lakes (ancestors came via hatcheries from same southern streams) are more Bluegill like and typically do not have anything tougher than Rams Horn Snails to eat seasonally. It is my guess that my location is north of where Redear would occur naturally without periodic infusions from stocked reservoirs.


I think Shorty described some pretty large amounts of winter kill in his RES last year in Nebraska. So cold water stress would go along with that argument for need of periodic infusions. With just one year in say ten where a bad winter would knock populations back, it could be hard for the RES to continue to compete and prosper along side other fish species that were better adapted to their local environment.

I know I put 175 RES and 100 CNBG in my sediment pond and based on the fingerlings I got out of it I could have put 25 CNBG and still had more BG recruitment than I did RES.


Edited by snrub (11/25/17 09:52 AM)
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#483146 - 11/25/17 10:12 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
Jim Wetzel Offline


Registered: 08/16/17
Posts: 291
Loc: Holts Summit, MO
I think RES can handle the cold relatively well. The problem is when they get squeezed out by other sunfishes when forage base does not offer something RES can go after when competition with other species gets seasonally intense like in the summer. You do not have to starve to be wiped out, rather you have reduced fitness that causes population to decline over time. Way up north you have Pumpkinssed that overlap quite a bit and likely do have a leg up when it comes to thermal adaptions.

When I go sampling streams attached to reservoirs supporting strong populations of RES, the RES tend to be most abundant in YOY as part of cohorts produced earlier in the breeding season like in late April through May. The June and into early July are poorly represented. I have not seen literature that parses out whether nutritional stressed adults breeding or reduced competitiveness of early life-stage RES in face of BG is the cause for this. Either way, most of the later RES spawning effort up here seems to be futile. Some years late season RES spawning effort does pay off.
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#483147 - 11/25/17 10:34 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
Shorty Offline
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Registered: 07/28/05
Posts: 4061
Loc: Raymond, NE
Originally Posted By: snrub
I think Shorty described some pretty large amounts of winter kill in his RES last year in Nebraska.


My winter kill happened at ice out after a very warm week in February that rapidly took 8-9" ice off the pond and likely mixed the water column in my 1/4 acre, I think the entire water column was super cooled at ice out. If I recall correctly Condello once hypothesized that the lethal water temperature for RES was right around 39 degrees. 39 degrees might be the point where the fish oils in RES gel, solidify, and they can no longer move and breath, they simply suffocate. I picked up 128 floaters in the 5 weeks after ice out last spring, most were between 5" and 8", I am pretty sure there were a bunch that never floated.
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#483150 - 11/25/17 12:28 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
Jim Wetzel Offline


Registered: 08/16/17
Posts: 291
Loc: Holts Summit, MO
Some RES can handle temperatures down to around 36 F for at least a week or two. This based on daily temperature checks at deepest part of ponds that are at most 5' deep. Losses occurring during that interval appear more related to bacterial / fungal infections that may be secondary to cold stress. Some ponds not touched while others took a heavy hit.
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#483152 - 11/25/17 01:38 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: Jim Wetzel]
Shorty Offline
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Registered: 07/28/05
Posts: 4061
Loc: Raymond, NE
Jim, my thoughts are that RES might winter kill in much the same manner that gizzard shad do, it's the sudden drop in water temperature, usually 5 degrees or more dropping temps below 39 degrees that gets them. They simply can't acclimate to the temperature change quick enough and the fish oils start to solidify.

http://www.in-fisherman.com/biology/science-of-shad-winterkill/



Edited by Shorty (11/25/17 10:13 PM)
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#483186 - 11/26/17 08:18 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
ewest Offline
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Registered: 03/08/05
Posts: 18987
Loc: Miss.
Some info -

]•FFECT OF WINTER KILL ON THE PONDS

Death of fish when oxygen is depleted and concentrations of carbon

dioxide build up beneath snow-covered ice is a common phenomenon

in the North Central States (Greenbank, 1945; Bennett, 1948b; Cooper

and Washburn, 1949). For the Marion County farm ponds information

on .occurrence of winterkill has been gathered from two sources: from

farmers and others who observed numbers of dead fish in ponds following

the breakup of ice, and from pond histories that indicate a sudden mass

disappearance of bass, of .bluegills, or of both. While in many cases there

is no evidence as to the time of year when such fish disappeared, heavy

mortality during the summer was observed by *he pond owners only once

(Pond 16) while winterkill was observed frequently. The chances of mass

mortality of fis•h being unobserved are probably greater in the win,ter than

the summer.

It appears that fish populations in 31 of the ponds suffered winterkill

(Table 6). In 15 ponds bass were eliminated but some bluegills survived;

in two ponds the reverse was true, with bluegills winterkilled while some

bass survived. The differential in mortality between these two species may

represent a difference in tolerance to low oxygen levels (though Cooper

and Washrburn, 1949, found none), but more likely it may represent

a difference in location within the pond during wintertime and ability

of some individuals to ioca•te and utilize pockets of water containing suf-

ficient oxygen for survival.

Complete kills of both bass and bluegills occurred in 18 ponds. Thirteen

of the 18 ponds also contained bullheads, and these always survived in

some numbers.

Some ponds winterkill repeatedly, as is shown by the frequency of some

pond numbers in Table 6.

T^BLE &--Known or suspected winterkills of fish in Iowa farm fish ponds

Species eliminated by kill Pond numbers

Bass, but not bluegills ..........................

3, 19, 19, 20, 24, 24, 29, 30, 32,

32, 35, 37, 40, 47, 48, 49, 49, 49,

50, 59

Bluegills, but not bass ..........................

3, 27

Bass and bluegills ...............................

9, 10, 11, 15, 16, 16, 16, 16, 20,

23, 27, 31, 35, 36, 39, 40, 41, 47,

49, 55, 56

Some bass and some bluegills ...................

94, 15, 25, 37, 45

Winterkill is believed to be a major factor in the lack of population

balance and success of Iowa ponds. The population remaining after an

incomplete kill is often very different than that presen.t before, and the

change is usually unfavorable for .angling (Bennett, 1948a). Of the ponds

which winterkilled, one-half had Ibeen listed as muddy with colloidal clay,

and one-third were known to have had low water levels going into the

winter season.



Data sources used for analysis of geographic variations in acute temperature preferences of fishes.

Redear sunfish, Lepomis microlophm'

Hill et al. (1975) Oklahoma 16.0-26.0

Still others, particularly the centrarchids, showed

occasional low thermal responsiveness. Fishes

continued to seek increased temperatures until

they succumbed due to physiological inability

to adjust to a rapid increase in temperature in

a steep gradient.


When raising hybrid striped bass in cages, several producers have reported sudden losses of hybrids when the water temperature rapidly decreased by several degrees in a relatively short period of time (Valenti 1989; A. M. Kelly and C. C. Kohler, personal observation). The rapid onset of cold temperatures has been reported as the cause of death in several species of fish (Verril 1901; Storey 1937; Galloway 1941; Gunther 1941; Ash et al. 1974; Coutant 1977; Mitchell 1990). It is believed that the lipid composition in the fish muscle plays a vital role in the ability of fish to adapt from one temperature to another (Hazel 1984; Greene and Selivonchick 1987; Henderson and Tocher 1987). Phospholipids are the class of lipids in which the most obvious changes occur. As environmental temperatures decrease, the invariable response is an increase in fatty acid unsaturation (Johnston and Roots 1964; Caldwell and Vernberg 1970; Hazel 1979; Cossins and Prosser 1982). Conversely, as ambient temperatures increase, phospholipid saturation must also increase to avoid excess fluidity. The dynamics of lipid composition of cells occurs in order to maintain a constant fluid matrix for enzymes associated with membranes (Greene and Selivonchick 1990). Different species of fish differ in their patterns of fat deposition and mobilization, which in turn affects the temperature range in which the species can grow and survive. For example, the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus does not store excess lipids in the musculature but rather relies on visceral deposits that it is incapable of mobilizing at low temperatures, which results in high mortalities between 8°C and 6.5°C (Satoh et al. 1984). Viola et al. (1988) demonstrated that the common carp Cyprinus carpio, which is capable of mobilizing lipids from muscular and visceral deposits, is able to survive to 4.5°C under the same conditions.

The amount of unsaturated fatty acids in the muscle is believed to affect a fish's ability to tolerate lower temperatures (Hoar and Dorchester 1949; Hoar and Cottle 1952a, 1952b). In general, the tissue temperature of fish is within 1°C of the ambient water temperature (Carey et al. 1971; Reynolds et al. 1976). Physiologically, fish are affected by variations in water temperature in two ways (Hochachka and Somero 1984). First, temperature determines the rate of chemical reactions, and secondly, temperature dictates the point of equilibrium between the formation and disruption of the macromolecular structures in biological membranes. Structural flexibility, therefore, is a requirement for integrity of biological membranes (Hazel 1993). Cold temperatures constrain this flexibility and, as a result, stabilize less active conformations. The rate of increase in the ability of fish to tolerate higher temperatures usually requires less than 24 h at temperatures above 20°C, whereas the gain in resistance to lower temperatures is a much slower process, requiring up to 20 d in some species (Doudoroff 1942; Brett 1944). The rate of resistance to lower temperatures is governed in part by the rate of metabolism, which is depressed at lower environmental temperatures. The simulated cold front in this study resulted in higher mortalities
Diets influence the fatty acid composition in several species of fish (Henderson and Tocher 1987; Lovell 1989; Seo et al. 1994), and the ability of a fish to alter its lipid composition when placed in colder water is one factor that determines survival. For example, summer harvest syndrome is an anomaly seen in goldfish Carassius auratus when they are harvested in the summer and placed in tanks containing water that is colder than the pond water (Mitchell 1990). The death of these fish is thought to be a result of the fat that the goldfish consume or produce (Mitchell 1990). Goldfish with high concentrations of saturated body fat are less tolerant of temperature change than fish with high concentrations of unsaturated body fat. Similarly, rainbow trout Oncorhynhcus mykiss that have been fed diets high in saturated fats stiffen and die when placed in cold water (Mitchell 1990). In these fish, the fat apparently hardens in the colder water, causing the fat-impregnated muscles to stiffen and the fish to become exhausted and lose movement.

Although it has been hypothesized that temperature is closely linked to membrane composition, relatively few studies have been conducted to determine if a correlation exists between lipid composition and cold tolerance. This study was designed to determine the effect of a sudden temperature change (a simulated cold front) on striped bass, white bass, and their hybrids fed either a natural or prepared diet, as well as to determine their lower incipient lethal temperature. The association of fatty acid composition and unsaturated: saturated fatty acid ratios in these fish were examined with respect to their tolerance to cold.

We demonstrated that diet-induced muscle fatty acid composition directly affects cold tolerance of striped bass, white bass, and their hybrids. Fish fed fathead minnows had fatty acid ratios 10–25% higher than fish fed a prepared diet. When subjected to a simulated cold front, all groups of fish fed the prepared diet suffered high mortality (50–90%) whereas the groups fed the natural diet experienced zero mortalities. The LILT was also higher for fish fed the prepared diet.



Fish deaths due to cold temperatures have frequently been reported. It is generally believed that deaths arise from the rapidity of dropping temperatures whereby the fish are unable to acclimate to the lower temperature despite being within their biokinetic range. It is consequently critical especially in autumn to feed fish of the genus Morone, and possibly other genera, a diet that is relatively low in saturated fats when they are confined to surface waters in cages or pens.
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#483190 - 11/26/17 09:07 PM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
Centrarchid Offline
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Registered: 11/26/09
Posts: 106
Loc: .
Not published, but will put it out there. I maintained a group of 800 yoy LMB that were trained to eat pellet. Grading employed later to ensure uniformity of size and stocking density. After feed training, they were split into three groups. Fish were given pelvic fin clips to ID later. Then fish were then treated with one of three feeding regimens while maintained at 25 C for 28 days. Control group was not fed and lost a good amount of weight. Fish lipid group was fed a basal diet with supplemental menhaden fish oil for a total lipid content of approximately 12%. A tallow lipid group has same basal diet except beef tallow was used as the lipid source so diet again had same total lipid level. Fish in second two groups doubled in weight during that interval. Then groups were combined in replicated units where each had 30 fish from each group in 200-gallon tanks for a simulated fall-winter-spring cycle. There were four such tanks each with a biofilter and chiller and a light on a timer. Tanks were then chilled at 5 degree Celsius increments with chilling events occurring within a day on 28-intervals. After months temperature was down in the 4 - 5 Celsius range which was maintained for 2 months. Then temperature was brought up in the reverse of the temperature reduction. Mortalities of significance did not occur until the temperate started coming back up and it was restricted to the control group. Mortalities appeared to be more closely tied to energy reserve quantity rather than fatty acid profile.

I did this in same lab as Kelly and Kohler looking to see if I could replicate and expand upon there findings. My emphasis was on large mouth bass which were a hot topic at the time.

Working with sunfishes still, often in production ponds over winter, there have been times where monitoring fish under ice was important. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, total ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH, harness and alkalinity were all followed. Temp and DO daily while others weekly. When high death rates occurred, is was seldom related to water quality.

I have also seen where Bluegill grown on a natural forage did better under ice than pellet fed. Other things varied with dietary treatment so real cause not known.

Two lines of evidence indicate something else is at play. As a result, some assumptions whether published or not, are in the realm of dogma that are preventing a better understanding of the problem. Nutrition and temperature interactions very likely involved, as is something else that I think involves a pathogen(s).


Winter mortality is of concern to me even now. Harsh winters can cause unsustainable losses for producers.

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#483203 - 11/27/17 08:29 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
canyoncreek Offline


Registered: 05/07/13
Posts: 1602
Loc: West Michigan
how do they feed pellets under ice?

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#483205 - 11/27/17 08:53 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
djstauder Offline
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Registered: 03/31/07
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I "think" he means fed pellets throughout the remaining seasons of the year
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#483209 - 11/27/17 10:06 AM Re: for all you GSF lovers [Re: snrub]
nehunter Offline


Registered: 07/20/15
Posts: 57
Loc: NE
This is an observation I had, no science behind it. I had a tank with 20 green sun fish in it for cat fish bait. Over winter it froze solid, you could see the sun fish laying flat on bottom. Thought they all died, but in spring over half were still alive. If you have a pond that tends to winter freeze. I would put in a cross of some sort with the Green sunfish. The fish were not fed and were in a large stock tank with some green algae growing in it.

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#483238 - 11/27/17 04:31 PM Re: 100% Green Sunfish [Re: snrub]
ewest Offline
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Production Methods for Food-Sized Bluegills
CHARLES E. HICKS
MARK R. ELLERSIECK
CINDY J. BORGWORDT
North American Journal of Aquaculture 71:52–58, 2009
_ Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2009

TABLE 4.—Summary of initial and final weights, overall weight gain, duration of growth measurement, daily growth rate,specific growth rate (SGR), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) measured during various growth trials with bluegills (BG),commercial hybrid bluegills (HBG; bluegill 3 green sunfish Lepomis cyanellus), and Georgia Giant hybrids (GG; bluegill 3green sunfish; proprietary strain produced by Ken’s Fish Farm, Alapaha, Georgia).










Attachments
HBG Chart pdf.png (108 downloads)



Edited by ewest (11/27/17 04:39 PM)
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#483242 - 11/27/17 08:34 PM Re: 100% Green Sunfish [Re: snrub]
Bill Cody Offline
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ewest - what does this chart really show? The duration of each of those studies was different so how can they be compared effectively to provide good information? Does the SGR (specific growth rate) adjust for differences in study duration and variation of feeding methods?

Evidently the researchers thought and concluded the georgia giants were created be crossing BG and GSF.


Edited by Bill Cody (11/28/17 09:18 AM)
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Today at 06:45 PM
Hunting 2017/2018
by Pat Williamson
Today at 12:41 PM
Dock Help!
by DonoBBD
Today at 11:42 AM
Happy Birthday DonoBBD!
by snrub
Today at 10:55 AM
lowering level for weed control
by scott69
Today at 10:29 AM
Fall and winter aeration
by Flame
Today at 08:52 AM
plankton and water temps
by TGW1
Today at 06:32 AM
Newly Uploaded Images
Deer1
Clearing pics
My Lake - Kansas
Sand Quarry
Cactus Blum Ranch proposed pond
Cactus Blum Ranch proposed pond

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