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#462729 - 01/26/17 06:48 PM Draining Old Farm Pond
mglanham Offline


Registered: 11/04/16
Posts: 19
Loc: VA
Hey Board,

Been doing a lot of research and talking to a lot of engineers/consultants regarding my options. Given how much the permitting process would be here in VA, the idea of constructing a new pond appears cost prohibitive. I've had multiple experts quote me $25k minimum just to get through the county, state, and core of engineers (wetlands..).

Fortunately, I've got a silted in, 50 year old farm pond that is grandfathered from all these permits. At first, I was told it couldn't be expanded by a consultant. I then had an engineer look a little deeper and thinks we can increase from 1/2 acre to 1.25 acre....which is perfect! Total cost...probably 50Kish.

My question. The pond will need to be drained, and dam expanded and raised. The current dam has no valve, no pipe, it just has a run off on the side that controls the height.

I'd like to drain in myself to help reduce the cost of construction. Ive read siphon would be best. Ok. Once it's drained, should I hire someone to cut a trench in the dam so it doesn't fill back up and can dry out??

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#462730 - 01/26/17 06:58 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
John Fitzgerald Online   content


Registered: 10/27/15
Posts: 2010
Loc: S. end of Elkins, Arkansas
50 k seems way too high for 1.25 acres. My advice is do not cut the dam unless you have a way to compact it back. We cut my pond's dam to drain out what we could in August 2015, and could not pack the trench in properly after/during renovation, resulting in a leak. If I had a do over, I would just use a trash pump.
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#462731 - 01/26/17 07:17 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: John Fitzgerald]
mglanham Offline


Registered: 11/04/16
Posts: 19
Loc: VA
In order to get the pond bigger, the dam needs to be enlarged, extended, and raised. There is currently no pipe/drain system. I'd like to do it right so I don't have to go back and do it again.

I guess I could see if they could increase the size of the dam without cutting it. I'm no dirt mover.....so I have no idea confused

A lot of silt/muck has to get pushed out too. Hoping to drain the pond and start drying that stuff out..

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#462735 - 01/26/17 07:51 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
scott69 Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/12/08
Posts: 1021
Loc: Chambers county(Valley), alaba...
i have used those cheap chinese trash pumps and they work fine.
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#462748 - 01/27/17 09:26 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
fish n chips Offline


Registered: 09/06/11
Posts: 2315
Loc: Northeast Ohio
I would use a trash pump. It will be a pain to keep setting it up, but I think that would be best. However, I would consult the guy who going to do the work. He may plan on cutting it open anyway ( which I would question the guy's pond ability at that point). 1/2 pond would drain quickly with a 3 to 4" trash pump. You may want to dig a pit for the suction hose to be below the mucky level. That will be the only way the muck will begin to dry out, for the water water to flow into this pit out of the muck.

I am a little concerned for you about the water supply for a bigger pond. You say that there is no real overflow on the current pond. This tells me that rains rarely fill it up enough to need a regular overflow system. How will you get more water to fill a bigger pond?

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#462764 - 01/27/17 11:00 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
Quarter Acre Offline


Registered: 06/10/16
Posts: 758
Loc: West Central Missouri
I have a hard time seeing how pumping a pond out will allow it to dry. It's still going to hold water and try to fill up even a little with every rain keeping your muck wet. My biggest fear while renovating my 1/4 acre pond was that we would get half the muck out and a good rain would come and cover the remaining muck with water leaving my pond unfinished and filling back up.

We cut the dam below the muck line with a mini excavator to drain and then widened the cut with the track loader as the muck was hauled/pushed through the wide cut. Dam was cut in May and muck removal started mid September. When we got down to the last few feet of muck we stopped cutting the dam deeper as the weather forecast did not call for any rain for what was left to dig out (a day or two). Once the muck was removed, we dug good clay from the far side and refilled the wide cut in the dam compacting the best we could as we went. It looks great, BUT it's not filled back up yet due to the lack of rain. My guy is a "dirt man" with many ponds under his belt. So hopefully his 30 plus hours and my $3000 don't end up as an expensive leak. Keep in mind that my little pond has many times the amount of watershed than it needs and will fill up with a few 3 inch rains.
_________________________
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Noel

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#462773 - 01/27/17 12:13 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
Rainman Offline
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Registered: 06/06/07
Posts: 6962
Loc: St Louis, MO area
If you have a "silted in" pond, it would cost 4 times the price of bucketing out muck over cutting a breach in the current dam. 50K sounds about right for moving silt and rebuilding/expanding/raising a dam....it will take a LOT of earth being moved.

A siphon is by far the fastest, lowest cost method of draining a pond, but the total "lift" is a limiting factor. Using 4" (or even 2") schedule 40 PVC and rubber connection couplers makes a temporary siphon easy to build. Also, a complete renovation would be the perfect time to install a permanent, well designed, bottom draw, automatic start/stop siphon that will nearly eliminate future silt issues forming in the future. If you are prepared to spend around $50K, plan, plan, plan, and don't cut corners to save the most dollars!
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#462774 - 01/27/17 12:22 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: Quarter Acre]
John Fitzgerald Online   content


Registered: 10/27/15
Posts: 2010
Loc: S. end of Elkins, Arkansas
The cut in my dam was narrow and cut with a back hoe. That's why we could not compact it well, and maybe part of the reason I still have a leak. If you cut the dam with a dozer, and make a wide, shallow v cut, you should be able to compact it back with wheeled equipment. With our latest pond, we used a 20,000 lb backhoe with a yard plus of dirt in the front bucket to compact the entire basin and rather shallow dam.

Edit: My old 1/4 acre pond renovation including removal of 5 feet of muck cost under $2,900 and construction of the new 1/4 acre pond which is about 60% excavation and 40% dam cost just under $2,800. Neither have piped spillways, as watershed is limited, and I have creek water available about seven months of the year.


Edited by John F (01/27/17 12:28 PM)
Edit Reason: added paragraph
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#463302 - 02/06/17 12:18 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: Rainman]
DCQuarterCircle Offline


Registered: 10/20/15
Posts: 33
Loc: Hotchkiss, Colorado
Rainman, I just read your post advising the following and will doubtless have more questions for you on this very subject.

You wrote: "Also, a complete renovation would be the perfect time to install a permanent, well designed, bottom draw, automatic start/stop siphon that will nearly eliminate future silt issues forming in the future."

My pond has a bottom drain that the drain pipe plugs into. From what I understand, that pipe can simply be pulled straight up and the pond drains out. What do you mean by a a permanent, well designed, bottom draw, automatic start/stop siphon that will nearly eliminate future silt issues forming in the future?

Please explain. This coming March a neighbor heavy equipment operator is going to completely redo my pond. I am, of course, VERY curious of how to circumvent future buildup of silt, if possible. Thanks for any helpful info! I included a photo from Today after letting the pond refill from having it drained 2 feet lower.

Another photo of a closeup somewhat of the drain pipe configuration. The pipe extends about 4 feet below that screw-in drain plug in the vertical pipe. I capped the 45 degree section so it would fill up and drain in from the top. Please correct me if I was mistaken in doing that, but a top drain is all we had in our pond when I was a kid. That pond was 15' deep.

If it matters, the pond refilled back to the top of the pipe level in 96 hours easy. There are several feeder springs into flowing into this pond, and it NEVER freezes over. Coldest water temp all winter was 45F degrees.

Lastly, there is a third photo showing what the pond looked like after unscrewing the side drain plug in the vertical pipe.

Question here: Why would the water level only drain to half way down the opening? Is that how fast the inflow is compared to outflow? Shouldn't it drain all the way to the bottom of the screw-in drain plug shown?

From my best guess, there is at least 1.5' of pure organic muck covering the entire bottom of this pond, accumulated in about 15 years from the previous excavation clean-out. That is a primary reason I am having it dug out (again).

Chuck


Attachments
Drain pipe from a distance looking at screw cap side.jpg (1756 downloads)
Whole Pond February 2017.jpg (2190 downloads)
Pond half drained with leaf litter.jpg (1383 downloads)


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#469667 - 04/16/17 12:18 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: DCQuarterCircle]
DCQuarterCircle Offline


Registered: 10/20/15
Posts: 33
Loc: Hotchkiss, Colorado
Hmm. No replies? Is this thread even looked at anymore? I sure could use some advice, and this is the most relevant thread I found on draining a farm pond to rework it. I can't cut any new dam to move muck out, as there isn't a dam right now, only a drain pipe with several springs with GREAT output to keep quite a flow.

The decent amount of flow through this pond is why I can't use natural muck-eating products, as they would just wash through.

I want to drain my pond to have it dug out, but I have a BIG concern as per a neighbor's comments on my pond. He said he would not dig as deep as I wanted (15') as he'd hit mancos shale, resulting in a leaking pond. There is at least 2' of heavy muck across the entire bottom. Making the pond only about 6' deep, and too warm for most any fish to survive in it at 66F degrees all summer.

He said 10' might be okay, but he also said he recommends against removing all the muck layer as it is an important sealing layer keeping leaks from happening.

Does the anti-leaking layer of muck claim have any merit? If he doesn't want to dig it out, I can find someone who will do it, but no doubt for more $$.

The neighbor is a very accomplished heavy equipment operator, and has dug several of his own ponds, so I put some weight to his words, but not complete confidence.

I hope to hear back real soon. I'd like to pull the drain tomorrow (Easter) to begin to let it dry over the next month or so, and have it dug out.

Thanks all and Happy Easter!
Chuck


Edited by DCQuarterCircle (04/16/17 01:33 AM)

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#469672 - 04/16/17 06:00 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
RAH Offline
Lunker

Registered: 05/17/09
Posts: 4211
Loc: Indiana, Boone County, 25 mile...
I am doubtful that the muck is sealing the pond. Did it leak before the muck formed? It is hard to tell where the organic material in your pond is coming from. If it is washing in from the watershed, can you install a settling pond to intercept the inflow?

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#469677 - 04/16/17 07:32 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: RAH]
esshup Offline
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Registered: 01/26/09
Posts: 24029
Loc: Grovertown, Indiana
Chuck, with a water temperature of 66F all summer long, trout will live in the pond all year long.

I would use a 3" semi trash pump to drain the water from the pond, and cut steps in the side of the pond to place the pump as close to the water level as possible as the pond water level drops.

I would dig a test hole to see what the soil is like at the different depths, that will allow you to determine how deep to dig the pond. If you run into clay, stockpile it to put back in the pond bottom and compact it with a sheepsfoot roller to get good compaction. Don't plan on getting the proper compaction with the tracks from the excavator or from the tracks on a dozer.
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3/4 to 1 1/4 ac pond LMB, SMB, PS, BG, RES, CC, YP, Bardello BG, (RBT & Blue Tilapia - seasonal).

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#469707 - 04/16/17 07:33 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: esshup]
DCQuarterCircle Offline


Registered: 10/20/15
Posts: 33
Loc: Hotchkiss, Colorado
Thank you all VERY much for your feedback! Sure is draining slow thus far after two hours of taking the stand pipe out of the bottom drain pipe connection. We'll see tomorrow if anything has changed. It was easy to keep it open when the stand pipe was in place, but I'm a little concerned now as I cannot see the bottom pipe opening to make sure it is not blocked, potentially resulting overflowing.

...Always something.

Looking forward to more progress on this pond. Good things take time, I know.

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#469710 - 04/16/17 09:21 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: DCQuarterCircle]
esshup Offline
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Registered: 01/26/09
Posts: 24029
Loc: Grovertown, Indiana
If you DO have to unblock it, be very, very careful and unblock it from the outlet side, not the inlet side. If you get sucked into the pipe, or part of your body gets sucked into the pipe from the inlet side, it could get very messy very quickly..
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3/4 to 1 1/4 ac pond LMB, SMB, PS, BG, RES, CC, YP, Bardello BG, (RBT & Blue Tilapia - seasonal).

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#469806 - 04/17/17 11:24 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: esshup]
DCQuarterCircle Offline


Registered: 10/20/15
Posts: 33
Loc: Hotchkiss, Colorado
Thanks esshup, always a treat to have your input. Well, ya know what? I pulled on that blasted pipe for a good bit, while my Honey's son Ben held onto my lifevest while he was on shore to not let anything too bad happen. I could not get the pipe to lift all the way free of the inlet at the bottom without any leverage, so he went into the pond himself. It took his full strength to hug it and pull it up. Then he scooted the few feet to shore quick, and crawled up on land without incident at all.

I am mainly replying to your post to say the pond seemed to drain for a moment, then stopped draining much at all. A trickle of about the same amount as its usual flow seems to be what the case is right now. So it is not overflowing but is not draining either.

Incredible that with as phenomenal of force as that much water pressure creates, whatever is blocking the outlet can actually withstand it. I intend to find a gas powered water pump (or air?) to attach to the outlet and blow out whatever is impeding the flow, which, yes, I know, is exactly what you recommended to do anyway.

I was also thinking to try to find the inlet with a long small diameter pole, e.g., long aluminum pool cleaner pole to see if I could just poke whatever it is through the pipe inlet. Absolutely no change has occurred in water level since yesterday when the pipe was pulled, except for that little bit at first that I mentioned.

It irritates me that I did not know there was a second side drain screw-in drain cap several inches from the bottom of the vertical drain pipe that we pulled out yesterday. Had I known that plug was there, I'd have just unscrewed that first before yanking the whole pipe - MUCH less likelihood of plugging a side drain hole than a very bottom hole. Oh well. Learn as ya go.

Again, many thanks for any and all input helping me become a wiser pond steward.


Edited by DCQuarterCircle (04/26/17 12:42 PM)

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#469834 - 04/18/17 11:50 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: DCQuarterCircle]
esshup Offline
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Registered: 01/26/09
Posts: 24029
Loc: Grovertown, Indiana
A few sticks sideways over the top of the pipe, with a wad of leaves will block it pretty good.
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3/4 to 1 1/4 ac pond LMB, SMB, PS, BG, RES, CC, YP, Bardello BG, (RBT & Blue Tilapia - seasonal).

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#470309 - 04/24/17 11:31 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: esshup]
DCQuarterCircle Offline


Registered: 10/20/15
Posts: 33
Loc: Hotchkiss, Colorado
Okay, what now? I was really hoping the top of the drain pipe at the bottom was LOWER THAN IT IS. Rats. There is still about a foot or two of water in the pond, and yeah, I know. A trash pump is the ticket here. I need to channel the springs feeding the pond directly to the drain so more can dry than just the banks all around it.

At the very least, I want to get a little trackhoe to clean up all around the edge of the entire pond to get rid of all the thick weeds and grass. I know it will all try to grow back in time, but for the meantime I'll provide fish habitat eventually when I get it to that point. I think a small trackhoe should fit on the narrow bank okay

I am PLENTY OPEN FOR IDEAS OF ALL SORTS ON WHAT TO DO NEXT WITH THIS POND. If the photos don't indicate it well enough, the pond really is only about 6 feet deep to the top of the muck.

I mainly wanted to get photos up here to get feedback and suggestions. Ideally, it would get dry enough to dig out. That will be complicated as the bank is mighty narrow between the pond and the neighbor's dirt driveway.

For any helpful input, MANY MANY THANKS AND GREAT APPRECIATION FOR THE ADVICE.


Attachments
Pond Nearly COMPLETELY DRAINED (Drain inlet before clearing the opening).jpg (1184 downloads)
Pond Nearly COMPLETELY DRAINED (East bank).jpg (389 downloads)
Pond Nearly COMPLETELY DRAINED (Looking North - also showing some algae at south end).jpg (438 downloads)
Pond Nearly COMPLETELY DRAINED (Looking South - NOTE algae problem).jpg (348 downloads)
Pond Nearly COMPLETELY DRAINED (West bank).jpg (402 downloads)



Edited by DCQuarterCircle (04/24/17 12:03 PM)

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#470582 - 04/27/17 02:09 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
Quarter Acre Offline


Registered: 06/10/16
Posts: 758
Loc: West Central Missouri
DC, any progress? I can't help but think that getting the rest of the water out will require, as you know, a trash pump and plenty of muddy trips into the hole for proper placement of the suction line. Once the lowest spot reveals itself, you may try digging a pit there, lining it with a half barrel to keep the pit open. The barrel would likely need to be peppered with drilled/cut holes and a weed barrier mesh wrapped around its outside to keep the sludge from filling the barrel, but still allow water to get in. I have not done this by no means, but its the first thing I would try if I was not able to get the big boys in to scoop it out wet. All I really know is that muck is very sloppy, a lot like quick sand I'd imagine, very hard to shove and control.

Your pond does not look to be too big, there are medium to large bucket hoes that could make the reach and scoop out the soupy muck which may be the only way if you can not keep water from running into the pond. You will need to eliminate any springs or gullies from feeding the hole or your muck will remain wet. The muck that was pushed over my dam last October still pumped up and down as I drove my 8N tractor over it in early April. We had a dry winter, but the pumping muck was about 10 feet deep on the back side of the dam. The stuff hold water like it was meant too.
_________________________
Fish on!,
Noel

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#470586 - 04/27/17 02:52 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
John Fitzgerald Online   content


Registered: 10/27/15
Posts: 2010
Loc: S. end of Elkins, Arkansas
My pond was renovated in August 2015. The bulldozer and backhoe came the same day I finished pumping and draining it to the top of the muck. The dozer started on the high side opposite the dam and worked toward the dam. The backhoe was set up on the lowest side of the dam and dug a pit there for the dozer to push muck into. The backhoe would toss the muck from the pit to the back side of the dam. The soil below the muck was much drier and the dozer could get traction by digging through the muck. The dozer finally worked all the way to the dam and the muck was out and somewhat spread. This plus the clearing of trees and brush took about two days on my less than 1/4 acre pond. The third day was spent in shaping and making the pond to be a full 1/4 acre. It had about 5 feet of muck in the deepest part and little at the edges.

The muck took about 11 months to dry enough so it could be spread further and shaped out to one side of the dam, which made the dam there much less steep on the back side. It is now heavily grassed and you would never know it was once pond muck. Fresh pond muck being pushed out has the look and consistency of wet concrete (that never sets up).
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#470614 - 04/27/17 09:17 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: Quarter Acre]
DCQuarterCircle Offline


Registered: 10/20/15
Posts: 33
Loc: Hotchkiss, Colorado
Thanks fellas for your insightful replies. Quarter Acre, the recent progress included putting the drain stand pipe back in place to allow the broken pipe locations downstream to dry out enough to replace them more easily and cleanly. So, for now It's filling back up in the meantime. I can drain it anytime very easily once I come up with a better plan. It REALLY helps to know the top of the drain pipe with the stand pipe removed is NOT on the absolute bottom of the pond.

As for the "muddy trips" to move the pump intake, I'd put a rope on it same as I have on the diffuser at the bottom. This makes it easy to move it, allowing me to stay safely on dry land.

The pond is about 95' x 76' x 8' deep. The depth obviously depends on just how thick the muck really is. As you can see in the photos, it is all very steep (vertical, actually) all around except a little slope at the south end where the smaller tree is. These dimensions calculate to approximately .17 surface acres total.

You're right, not very big at all, but still a GREAT opportunity to provide high quality habitat for all kinds of critters here, e.g., fish, wildlife, farm animals, PEOPLE who want to swim, etc. Right now we have goats as our livestock, and when it's drained drink from a spring I dug out to provide a drinking pool for them.

Ideally, I would be able to dig down where the drain pipe is already, and shorten the height to as low as I can to install something like what you described. Somehow I'd have to keep it clear enough of debris falling into it while doing that.

I just looked up the maximum reach on large CAT excavators and it looks like they max out at just shy of 40' reach. This means they would have to be able to go along the hill side of the pond, not the driveway side where, as the photos show is way too narrow for anything but a mini excavator. Of course, another critical deciding factor of ALL Of this project is good 'ole cost.

Again, thanks for any and all input here. I REALLY appreciate every bit of it.

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#471091 - 05/02/17 10:02 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: DCQuarterCircle]
DCQuarterCircle Offline


Registered: 10/20/15
Posts: 33
Loc: Hotchkiss, Colorado
Another question here...

So, I have the pond drained down to the upper drain hole in the stand drain pipe and am most curious if cleaning off all around the entire pond with a mini bobcat excavator will render me ANY benefit at all to this pond. I will physically remove all the FA that just showed up recently, and hit this pond as hard and fast as I can with any natural measure I need to in the lifelong effort to minimize algae. I know attempting as full removal as possible of ALL algae is not a good idea, I get that.

So, question here is: Would removal of all vegetation at the water's edge (grass clumps, cattails, etc.) provide any benefit? The construction of the pond banks does not offer any fish an easy opportunity to make any breeding beds near shore, as I've seen created by countless sunfish-family of fish in other ponds with gentle sloped banks.

As always, many thanks to all who respond with helpful insight here.


Attachments
Aerator working in pond drained to upper drain cap (resized photo 64%).jpg (511 downloads)


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#471103 - 05/03/17 08:00 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
fish n chips Offline


Registered: 09/06/11
Posts: 2315
Loc: Northeast Ohio
What is your #1 goal for this pond?
You mention several things, with both swimming and livestock too. In my opinion, you really only should do/achieve one of those two things.

With your set-up/location of the pond, it looks like choices will be very limited. If you go with livestock area, I think your muck and sediment build-up will be fast. I would dig the most accessible area deeper with a slope towards it,. doesn't matter that you can't reach all of it. The muck will tend to slide towards the deeper end you dig. Then every few years, have it cleaned out in that deeper pit area. Have the area where you can get an excavator and then be able to pull a truck in next to it. That way muck goes from pond to truck with one step. Haul away somewhere else onto your property and repeat as necessary every few years. Initially, you might even have to landscape some spot around the pond to be able to this. but then it will be done for future cleanouts.

The other option is to install a new siphon drain that is set-up to pull water out of the deepest part. Then when the pond fills and flows, it will pull out the muck with the moving water from the bottom. It looks like you have plenty of drop around the pond to achieve a good siphon drain. Not sure if you would be allowed to drop that directly into the road ditch? They might not like the amount of silt that comes with it, however if you had no pond there, that erosion would end up there anyway.

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#471250 - 05/04/17 09:07 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: fish n chips]
DCQuarterCircle Offline


Registered: 10/20/15
Posts: 33
Loc: Hotchkiss, Colorado
Fish 'n Chips, thanks for your helpful reply. #1 goal for this pond is hard to identify that easily. It is many-fold, i.e., simply to have a healthy little BOW right here below the house for us to enjoy aesthetically; to be able to fish and swim in. Stock watering is a given out of it, but it doesn't affect the water quality in the slightest. Only a few goats do not create much for any issues here, and for hay reasons, we're considering going down to two goats total for the winter. A quick note of this particular BOW: I haven't measured gpm input yet, but there is so much fresh water flowing through this pond it negates any biological additive measure for algae control for example.

I don't know if swimming in this pond will become a reality any time soon. That will require a GREAT deal of digging out I expect, as nobody would want to let their feet drop down into mostly Godawful smelling grey clay mud/muck that resembles glue more than anything.

You are very correct in that where/how my pond is situated seriously limits options for modifying it much. I imagine difficulty in having a sizeable excavator at the north end, where the solar panel aerator system is. That is the largest area nearest the drainpipe. So, if the deepest part of the pond became instead nearest the paved road on the south side (right side in photo), would a siphon drain really suck muck to the drain pipe on the other end of the pond?

How long do you think it would take to drain muck as you describe? If only a matter of hours, I could lay a big pipe across the neighbor's driveway along side the pond and best case scenario let it fertilize our pasture on the other side of his road.

After all that, I'd still sure appreciate some opinions on any benefit to clearing out all the vegetation at the water's edge all around the pond. Cattails, LOTS of thick grass, willows, etc. I think I will have this done anyway, again, for aesthetic reasons if no other. I know all this vegetation provides little members of the food chain to be plentiful and available to the aquatic and other ecosystems, and it will doubtless grow back quickly. If anything seems insufficient for providing habitat for frogs, tadpoles, etc., I'll create some with a few pallets or something.

Thanks again!

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#471256 - 05/04/17 10:24 PM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
fish n chips Offline


Registered: 09/06/11
Posts: 2315
Loc: Northeast Ohio
I do think that a siphon drain at the other end, with the pond being further deepened at the new inlet, would get sediment/muck to slide towards the new drain. It may take time ( years?) but it probably is the best option for a regular maintenance feature. Perhaps with aeration stirring the water, it may work fast.

I am not sure about cleaning up those edges. They are steep, and more digging at the edge will probably get the ground to collapse into the water. You sure don't have the leeway to lose more ground there.

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#471264 - 05/05/17 07:05 AM Re: Draining Old Farm Pond [Re: mglanham]
wbuffetjr Offline


Registered: 08/16/14
Posts: 834
Loc: in the mountains
We used a long reach that was in the Montrose area last summer. It could reach 60' out. That would probably totally solve your problem in just a few hours. Maybe they will have that machine around again this summer. The guys name was Bill Gray and he did a great job for me.
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