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#461568 - 01/06/17 02:21 PM Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries
overtonfisheries Offline
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Registered: 04/25/02
Posts: 881
Loc: East/Central Texas
After having accumulated over 15 years of tilapia growing and stocking experience, plus hearing many cases of success and failure from our clientele, I feel compelled to offer some tips for the successful use of tilapia in fishery management down here in Texas.

Here are a set of guidelines to follow for success using tilapia as a management tool:

1. Don't get in a hurry to stock. We normally start getting calls for tilapia in March, but late season cold snaps pose significant risk to the welfare of your tilapia, so we recommend waiting until April/May for most of the state (wait until temps stabilize in the 70s or higher). In addition, tilapia can compete for bass spawning areas if they are stocked too soon.

2. Choose the right supplier for your fish, so that you end up stocking the right type of tilapia. For spring stocking, you will want MIXED SEX ADULT TRUE MOZAMBIQUE tilapia, not nile or blue or hybrid, preferably 1/4lb+ in size for good survival rates and confirmed maturity. Choose a TRUSTED source as your tilapia supplier, and preferably a source that grows their own fish. There are many good reasons for lake and pond owners to take this point seriously. True Mozambique tilapia are the only species that are legal to stock in Texas without a special exotic species permit. True Mozambique tilapia have a poor cold tolerance compared to nile/blue tilapia, which is a desirable trait since tilapia overwintering in your fishery can have negative consequences. True Mozambique tilapia mature at a younger age and smaller size than other species, so they have more reproductive potential and value as a forage fish. Ask your potential supplier for pictures of their product, or visit the fish farm to look for yourself. The main cultured species of tilapia usually can be distinguished by different banding patterns on the caudal fin. Nile tilapia have strong vertical bands, Blue tilapia have interrupted bands, and Mozambique tilapia have weak or no bands on the caudal fin. Mature male Nile tilapia have gray or pink pigmentation in the throat region, while Mozambique tilapia have more of a yellow coloration. Here are some pictures of our True Mozambique tilapia:


Male Tilapia


Female Tilapia


3. Prepare your fishery before stocking tilapia. As with most all forage fish species, the degree of reproductive success/recruitment of offspring in any fishery will depend on many factors and conditions. In order to provide for the best conditions for tilapia reproductive success, encourage a plankton bloom first. If your fishery is dominated by submerged aquatic weeds and algae, then take the month of March to work on control of potential nuisance growth and fertilize (if needed) before stocking tilapia. Some of you must be thinking..."but tilapia eat algae, so why treat before stocking?" Once newborn tilapia fry absorb their yolk sac, they need abundant plankton for immediate food, and a plankton bloom also provides cover from predators by reducing visibility. We have determined that tilapia fry can be very vulnerable to predation, and since each female lays 300-1000+ eggs per spawn (vs. 10,000-30,000 for bluegill) favorable conditions are critical for tilapia fry survival, and ultimately the success of your program.

4. Choose the right stocking rate for the situation. If you have a relatively new fishery with few or no predators, then choose a very low stocking rate, such as 5-10lbs per acre. Since tilapia reproductive success is greatly influenced by predator abundance, tilapia can easily overpopulate and dominate a pond with little or no predator pressure. If your fishery has adequate predation pressure, such as an established bass population, then shoot for stocking 10-100lbs of tilapia per acre, depending on your program, budget, etc. If, for example, you are stocking tilapia for algae control in a clear water fishery with a establish bass population, then you can expect minimal tilapia reproductive success due to predation, and you will have to rely on that original batch of tilapia stockers for all of your algae control for the entire season (unless you restock). In this case you may need a high stocking density, such as 50-100lbs per acre. There are a lot of scenarios where tilapia can be a good tool for fishery management. Ask a qualified fisheries professional for stocking rate recommendations for any specific needs.

5. Don't forget about fall tilapia. Many fishery owners/managers don't realize that there are two good opportunities to stock tilapia. The spring/early summer stocking program is straightforward, simply stock mature size tilapia as breeders for the entire season. HOWEVER, if your fishery conditions do not promote successful recruitment of tilapia offspring, you have a second chance to make the program work. Here at Overton Fisheries we typically have an overabundance of tilapia fingerlings in August/September/October, and we offer these at a discounted price (while supplies last) for late-season injection as fall forage. This program works VERY WELL, and this opportunity is overlooked by many. On this program you can get 3-6" size tilapia fingerlings in the late summer/early fall, at a discounted price, with good head count per lb, and they will continue to grow for several months before end of season. If you have had poor tilapia reproductive success in the past, or if your fishery is heavy on predators and light on plankton, then consider taking your tilapia budget and splitting it between two stockings, early season adults and late season fingerlings.


Late Season Fingerlings

6. Grow your own. Utilization of a separate breeder pond for tilapia fingerling production can render significant results. Most importantly, a breeder pond needs to be verifiably free of other fish before stocking, each season. For our special clients who need to stock a breeder pond, we are able to sex our tilapia breeders to provide the correct ratio of males:females for optimum reproductive success. A properly managed breeder pond can render 1000-4000lbs of fingerlings per acre. That's a lot of bait! Now all you need to do is get that forage into your main fishery! Sounds easy enough...but more difficult and involved than you might think. Please place your late season tilapia orders early in the season so that we may accommodate your request.

Just for kicks, here is a pic of one of our "Mixed-Mozies," a result of integration of Hawaiian Gold Mozambique into our stock of Black Mozambique tilapia:

Overton's Mixed-Mozambique Tilapia
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#461570 - 01/06/17 03:03 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
Zep Offline
Hall of Fame 2014


Registered: 07/27/10
Posts: 3070
Loc: Dallas & Wills Point, Tx
Great info....thanks Overton's!
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#461576 - 01/06/17 07:59 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
Bill Cody Offline
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Field Correspondent

Lunker

Registered: 04/18/02
Posts: 12398
Loc: Northwest Ohio - Malinta OH
Thanks for taking time for making this informative post.
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#461577 - 01/06/17 08:15 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
bcotton Offline


Registered: 05/01/13
Posts: 199
Loc: Texas
i am no taxonomist but i believe i see some nile and possibly blue genetics in a lot of the Mozambique tilapia i buy here in texas. I have always wondered where the line is drawn in the case of only mozambiques are legal but i like the white color that i sometimes see and breed for this color in my aquaponics. from my understanding pure 100% mozambique cannot be white?

I have had pond biologists in texas tell me that theres really no such thing as 100% pure strain mozamique tilapia because they have all been cross bread for so long.

i have also had pond biologists in texas tell me i cannot feed train crappie, so i do not necessarily blindly believe everything i am told even from professionals.. but i was hoping maybe todd could share his thoughts and experience on this?



Edited by bcotton (01/06/17 08:16 PM)

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#461584 - 01/07/17 07:25 AM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
Dave Davidson1 Offline
Moderator
Lunker

Registered: 01/04/06
Posts: 13429
Loc: Hurst & Bowie, Texas
Brian, I have heard that you can't feed train RES. But, I seem to have heard that you have done this. Right?
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#461594 - 01/07/17 12:28 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
Tbar Offline


Registered: 01/10/15
Posts: 654
Loc: Texas
Interesting.....thanks for sharing.
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#461617 - 01/08/17 01:31 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
bcotton Offline


Registered: 05/01/13
Posts: 199
Loc: Texas
i dont want to derail todd's topic, but yah, i have a lot of feed trained res, its become somewhat trivial... I have a few feed trained crappie but i am still working to improve that process its still a lot of deaths for every one that lives.

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#461625 - 01/08/17 03:52 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
highflyer Offline


Registered: 07/09/11
Posts: 1851
Loc: East Texas
Todd and crew are the best, I will be updating my genetics in the Topias again this year. And I'll get them from Todd. Its because of his passion and dedication to the fish, I know I'm getting the best.
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#461643 - 01/08/17 06:37 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: highflyer]
Tbar Offline


Registered: 01/10/15
Posts: 654
Loc: Texas
Originally Posted By: highflyer
Todd and crew are the best, I will be updating my genetics in the Topias again this year. And I'll get them from Todd. Its because of his passion and dedication to the fish, I know I'm getting the best.


I know I will be ordering again.

When the time comes maybe the NE Texas folks could schedule orders to optimize his delivery route.
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#461649 - 01/08/17 08:20 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: Tbar]
Zep Offline
Hall of Fame 2014


Registered: 07/27/10
Posts: 3070
Loc: Dallas & Wills Point, Tx
Originally Posted By: Tbar
When the time comes maybe the NE Texas folks could schedule orders to optimize his delivery route.


Yes lets try to do that. You can't be more than 18 miles from me. However I do like to wait on my fish delivery until late April because of what Todd warns about...an unexpected late cold-snap in unpredictable Texas that could be scary for the Tilapia.
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#461717 - 01/10/17 07:45 AM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
FireIsHot Offline
Moderator


Registered: 02/28/11
Posts: 3789
Loc: Emory TX
Todd, thanks for the info. I've experienced most of the numbers Todd listed, and 1 and 6 first come to mind.

Waiting for spring tilapia gets tough in late March, but stocking them a little later has worked for me. Spring water temps here can fluctuate almost daily, and waiting until things stabilize temp wise seems to get tilapia in the pond and nesting almost immediately.

I just wrapped up number 6 this last fall, and although the numbers were outstanding, me thinks I'll be back on the late season tilapia list this year. My cashew shaped hatchery pond is just not real conducive to aggressive seining.
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#461726 - 01/10/17 09:18 AM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
Snakebite Offline


Registered: 06/02/13
Posts: 520
Loc: TN, Lakeland
If you were on a budget and only could choose one seasonal stocking period for tilapia. You also have your algae and plant matter under control, so there was no need for tilapia to serve that function. Which season would it be spring stocking or fall stocking?
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#461728 - 01/10/17 09:36 AM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
Zep Offline
Hall of Fame 2014


Registered: 07/27/10
Posts: 3070
Loc: Dallas & Wills Point, Tx
Snakebite....I prefer Spring Tilapia stocking because in my neck of the woods stocking in the Spring means I will have my Tilapia for easily 6-7 months....stocking in Fall would mean only 3-4 months before the funerals would begin.
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#462137 - 01/16/17 04:13 PM Re: Texas Tilapia Stocking Tips - Overton Fisheries [Re: overtonfisheries]
overtonfisheries Offline
Lunker

Registered: 04/25/02
Posts: 881
Loc: East/Central Texas
I think snakebite has a very good question. Assuming that, due to clear water/heavy predation, you expect minimal reproductive success from tilapia stocked as adults in the spring/summer, the fall-fingerling stocking would render most return on investment. Adults stocked in the spring/summer may reproduce all season, but most all of the fry may fall victim to predation. Fall-fingerling tilapia stocker survival rates can be exceptional, compared to fry survival. In addition, they may double in size before the winter die-off, and would represent more bang-for-buck than stocking adults in spring/summer.
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