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#30460 - 07/27/04 10:45 PM "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Dick Faurot Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/03/02
Posts: 25
Loc: Bixby, Ok
With reference to the article by Mr Potts in the Mar-Apr 2003 issue of Pond Boss, has anyone out there tried what he suggests? I have a 2 1/2 year old pond approximately 1 acre in size with an average depth of about 6', max depth of about 12'. Location is in NE Oklahoma where we get plenty of runoff and plenty of hot summer weather. After reading the above article, thought I would give it a try....with no success. I am using a dual outlet aquarium airpump(Rena Air 400 which is rated as a deep air pump to 96") which is a much better pump than he suggested, a couple of feet of aquarium airline at both ends(less than the article suggests), about 100' of 5/8" garden hose, and 12" airstones at the end. Trouble is, can't even get a few bubbles out of the hose at the outlet end just below the surface let alone at the bottom of the pond. Even tried hooking up another air pump which I had handy so I now have two aquarium dual air airpumps(ie 4 connections) pumping air into one end of the garden hose(which is well sealed with silicone) with only two outlets at the other end, and still only a few bubbles.....when any air comes out at all. When I disconnect the airpumps, it is obvious that there is some backpressure as you can feel the air coming back. The article sure makes it sound simple, but that certainly has not been my experience. Anyone else out there tried this with any success?

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#30461 - 07/28/04 07:33 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
bigbukhntr Offline
Member

Registered: 04/28/03
Posts: 14
If you will look at the post "will this pump work", you can make a very inexpensive aerator for a small pond. I made this aerator up and it put out quite a bit of bubbles at 10' deep in my pond. It wasn't clearing up my algae (another story) so I bought a larger pump. But the pump recomended in the post was sufficient I now believe. I am now treating the algae situation with the proper chemicals and I will probably use the smaller pump on the other end of the pond, thereby having a aerator on each end and a large fountain in the middle.

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#30462 - 07/28/04 11:40 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Eric Offline
Lunker

Registered: 11/30/03
Posts: 538
Loc: Rochester NY
I also put together the Pump ( Gast ) and Diffuser from that thread. I have it in 14 ft of water in a 1/4 acre pond and am running it only part time and the pond is clean clear and sweet smelling and I have tons of happy fish. Best part of it all it is pumping about 1.5 SCFM creating a nice circulation and it all cost less than $80 installed.
_________________________
---------------------------------
1/10 - 1/4 acre pond Upstate NY 14 ft deep


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#30463 - 07/28/04 12:11 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Pottsy Offline
Lunker

Registered: 04/21/02
Posts: 494
Loc: Ottawa, Canada
Hello Dick Faurot,

You might be surprised at which 'better' aka more expensive pumps actually produce less pressure and air-flow. Rena-400 for example is only good for 0.078 cfm whereas the cheapest I mentioned in the article puts out .155 cfm per port and in the neighbourhood of 4-5 psi.

If you can barely get a few bubbles with the hose just under the surface then either your pumps are faulty or there is some kind of blockage/leak. When there is very little depth it takes very little pump to move the air. You might want to remove the air-stones and see if it is passing air through, just in case they are the problem. Check for leaks at any connections and or kinks in the lines. The Rena-400 might not push much air but it should push enough to see just below the surface.

*Note that through the winter I run a $20 pump through about 150 feet of line to two 12" air stones at 4-5 feet deep. Keeps a 10+ diameter hole open. Sometimes you get lucky with these type of diaphragm pumps and sometimes not it would seem. I might suggest a Hagen Optima single outlet pump... 0.177 cfm at 4 PSI or use the same set-up but with a GAST pump or Dynamaster 2 pump.
_________________________
Owner/Builder of Ottawa Canada's first official off-grid home.

http://www.mygamepictures.com - Hosting your outdoor adventure, fishing, hunting and sports related pictures!

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#30464 - 07/28/04 11:02 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Dick Faurot Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/03/02
Posts: 25
Loc: Bixby, Ok
Pottsy - Interestingly enough, there are no specs that came with the Rena 400....just that it was the only pump that PetSmart had that was rated to 96"(ie a deep air pump according to them). There are no kinks, I have double checked that and there is no leakage....it just does not pump enough air. I have disconnected from the air stones and just a few bubbles come out of the two air lines. My son will be installing an aquarium soon, so I guess I will be making a small donation for his application.

Regarding the GAST air pump, in my hurried reading of the posts that were referenced, I did not notice any reference to the noise level it creates....also, since I have electricity to the edge of the pond, I assume I could mount it there as long as it is protected from the weather.

Sure appreciate the comments and suggestions. Will eventually get something worked out.

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#30465 - 07/29/04 06:21 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Eric Offline
Lunker

Registered: 11/30/03
Posts: 538
Loc: Rochester NY
Dick I have the Gast pump placed in my work shed ( thin walls ) and have the garden hose through the wall. When walking by you can almost not even hear it. It would take you a bit to listen for it. This was one of my larger concerns. I did not want a system that was loud and produced alot of noise with the pump or with the Diffuser. The nice thing with both of these is that it is so quiet that nature is not disturbed and if you did not know it was there or did not see the bubbles you would never guess it was there.

I placed the diffuser in an old 5 gallon bucket and have a rope attached to it that is tied to a floating log that a painted turtle has adopted for sunning and the fatheads are using for spawning. The fat heads also use the rope to eat algea and other nutrients off from as it comes up from the bottom. Its sort of fun to watch them as well as they stay around it as the bubbles are moving the water.

I am getting about 1.5 SCFM of air and the water is moving nicely around the pond. My biggest worry was that I had to cut back the amount of time that the unit was on because I was losing my bloom and the minnows were hungry.

Along with what was posted I added a smalle $6 timer from Homedepot. It has been working great and I have the unit set to go on and off about 3 times a day thus far. The water is clean clear and sweet smelling and have happy fish.

That being said, good luck and have fun!!
_________________________
---------------------------------
1/10 - 1/4 acre pond Upstate NY 14 ft deep


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#30466 - 07/29/04 08:22 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Dick Faurot Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/03/02
Posts: 25
Loc: Bixby, Ok
Eric - Thanks, that is just what I was wanting to know. I noticed you are using a garden hose and was wondering how long a run you have to get to the diffuser, how long it has been working, and any deterioration with the garden hose? I noticed from some of the earlier posts regarding "Will this pump work?" that some were using tubing instead of a garden hose and it seems to me that it would be a better long term solution. Also, you mentioned using a diffuser. Again referencing the earlier posts, there seems to be quite a difference of opinion ranging from soaker hoses to air stones to diffusers. Would you mind telling me what diffuser you are using and where you acquired it? Thanks again....I will probably get this system up and running about the time summer is over at the rate I am going.

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#30467 - 07/29/04 09:11 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Eric Offline
Lunker

Registered: 11/30/03
Posts: 538
Loc: Rochester NY
Dick, I am using a 5/8 inch hose. It was the industrial grade hose ( double wall and thicker rubber.) I have had it in about 2.5 months thus far and only see a bit of slime on it but no degredation of the hose or rubber. I would have gone with the weighted tubing but could not find any around here and I had to run 125 feet of hose to get to where I wanted to put it in my pond. Plus the total cost of the hose was somewhere in the range of $17 from Sams club.

As for the diffuser, I am very happy with the one I have. It gives a good amount of dispersed bubbles and move tons of water without being out of control. The place I got it and the model number are as follows in the link below:

http://www.aquaticeco.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/product.detail/iid/9733

I am not an expert on diffusers but I can tell you from what I read a good diffuser has less chance of clogging and produces a uniform bubble pattern where the soaker hose seems to clog up and is not as uniform and the stones from what I have heard also clog more easily. Now others may say otherwise and I can't say it from any experience. All I can tell you is that this diffuser does not seem to clog even when I turn it on and off a few times a day and for the price of only $ 19 it was a good deal.

As for the pump and the entire system, I followed the wiring instructions on the other thread and had the entire system built and in the pond in less than 2.5 hours from the time I got all the pieces from the store. Nice quick and easy and inexpensive. ( left me with more money for the fish and other toys )

I hope that this helps and good luck and let us know when you get it up and running
_________________________
---------------------------------
1/10 - 1/4 acre pond Upstate NY 14 ft deep


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#30468 - 08/03/04 10:24 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
cmartin Offline
Member

Registered: 10/06/03
Posts: 14
Loc: Orlando, Florida
I would like to start the problem of getting air to the diffuser even just under the water's surface. Friction Loss in the lenght of tubing may be the problem in this one. In 1/2" tubing, typically required psi will be 0.16psi / 100' of tubing. Take that in combination of the depth, it takes 1psi to go down 27" of water and that will be your total psi needed. As Psi increases, cfm decreases. Therefore you may not have had enough volume of air for the combination of depth and lenght of air line.

Compressors; a new model is on the market now that can handle the psi and friction loss and provides 1.6 cfm at 20psi and is only 1/3hp. The name of the compressor is BrookWood.

Diffusers: You are correct that there are many different types. For uniformity, a stone or membrane are of preference. Stones typicall provide 3mm bubbles and membranes have been tested at 0.5mm bubbles. The smaller the bubble, the greater the surface area and the greater the circulation with smaller hp compressor.

Algae sitll present even with a diffuser: the total volume of the pond should be calculated and then back into how many diffusers of the type you are looking at using will be required to turnover the volume at least 0.75 times per day. There have been case studies done to determine this turnover rate as a goal to satisfy oxygen demand and allow for precipitation of iron and bonding of phosphates to the sediment layer thereby decreasing the food source for algae.

Summary: I would look into a compressor that will provide you enough psi and volume of air to reach the bottom of your pond, locate a quality diffuser, and if you fish in the pond, spend the money on the weighted tubing to prevent fishhook damage and kinking not to mention the time saved in not having to weight the standard garden hose to the bottom. Finally, make sure the diffuser system you will be using is sized properly for your pond. If you under aerate a pond, you will simply be causing yourself more headaches by increasing the nutrient amounts free-floating in the water column by suspending it from the bottom without satisfying the oxygen demand of the pond.
_________________________
Cary Martin

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#30469 - 08/03/04 09:15 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Dick Faurot Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/03/02
Posts: 25
Loc: Bixby, Ok
Cary - Thanks for a very informed opinion....as I suspected, the aquarium air pump was not putting out enough air for the length of line and water depth....which makes me wonder how in the world Christopher Potts got it to work in the referenced article. I sure couldn't.

Next problem....I noticed you are with Vertex, so I figure you have a vested interest in this topic anyway. I assume you have read the other posts regarding the GAST pump under the topic "Will this pump work?" According to the specs which can be found at http://www.gastmfg.com/pdf/rotvane/0532_1032_1532_series.pdf
it is 1/10 HP, and rated at 10PSI and 1.5 CFM. If you don't mind, what would be your professional opinion on this pump for my application. As mentioned in the first post, I have a pond of approx 1 acre, max water depth of 12', and an average of about 6' which translates into about 6 acre feet of water.

You mentioned a new 1/3 hp compressor by Brookwood....how would it compare?

And, you raised a whole new set of issues with you comments regarding under-aeration. Call me stupid, but I just figured any aeration would be better than none at all.

One other item....for anyone out there. Back to the GAST pump that has been highly recommended in some of the other posts. I noticed on the GAST homepage that there is a local dealer so I checked to see if it might be a stock item I could pick up locally. Turns out it has to be ordered and the MFSRP was well over $300....which makes me wonder about the $40 price mentioned so prominently. Can't help but wonder if it is the same thing or not. As you can imagine, the lady on the phone was stunned when I told her what the going internet price was.....assuming we are not comparing apples and oranges here.

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#30470 - 08/04/04 07:20 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Bob Koerber Offline
Member

Registered: 04/24/02
Posts: 470
Loc: Hartselle, Alabama
Hi Dick I am the one that posted about the Gast PC2050 it is from C and H sales a surplus company just click on the link below to take a look. They still have them in stock and also there are many others that they sale.

Bob

http://www.aaaim.com/u/web/aaaimc/cgi-local/shop991/shop.pl/SID=3092185917/page=REGS.htm#PC2050

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#30471 - 08/04/04 08:58 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
cmartin Offline
Member

Registered: 10/06/03
Posts: 14
Loc: Orlando, Florida
Dick,

For your application the Gast pump should work. Even at 12' of depth the compressor will have to generate 5.3 Psi to get to the depth. I would assume you would only require 100' of tubing to feed your diffuser. So your total psi required should be 5.49 psi.

Next I would check the pump curve to ensure you have enough cfm of air to feed the diffuser you will be using at 5.49 psi.

To compare the Brookwood, it will provide 1.5 cfm at the 5.49 psi. The CoActive AirStation will require only 1 cfm so this is a perfect match.

I was surprised too to hear a price of $40 for a compressor. The Brookwood cost $325. I have put together a turnover calculation sheet that I will email you for your review.
_________________________
Cary Martin

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#30472 - 08/04/04 09:52 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
DC41PONDOWNER Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 08/04/04
Posts: 2
Loc: TOMBALL, TX
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#30473 - 08/04/04 10:54 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
cmartin Offline
Member

Registered: 10/06/03
Posts: 14
Loc: Orlando, Florida
DC41Pondowner -

Lakes face two basic kinds of environmental problems: threats to water quality from the deterioration of the land comprising the lake’s watershed and poor quality water flowing or seeping into the lake from another source upstream. Direct effluent discharge from municipalities, agriculture and industries are a major source of water pollution. Watershed runoff carrying insecticides, landscaping and lawn fertilizers, grass clippings, septic tanks leachate and road and parking lot drainage also seriously foul lakes and accelerate the otherwise slow natural process of eutrophication.

Pollution causes an enrichment of the lakes with various nutrients including nitrogen and phosphorus and increased suspended solids. These nutrients support abnormally high levels of biological productivity including algae and aquatic weed growth and bottom muck accumulation. The worsening conditions create an excessive demand on the dissolved oxygen content of the lake.

Natural aeration occurs in two ways to meet a lake’s varying chemical and biological oxygen demand. First, horizontal and vertical density currents occur because most lakes stratify into layers with the warmer water on top in the epilimnion and colder water below in the hypolimnion. This separation of layers allows only the top layer access to oxygen from the atmosphere while the lower layer become stagnant and low in oxygen. Secondly, the annual seasonal cycle alternately warms and cools the epilimnion changing its density and causing the two layers to intermix and oxygenate the entire lake. Most lakes turn over twice per year in the spring and fall but very shallow lakes may remain destratified throughout the year via normal wind generated currents. In urban and agricultural communities natural aeration may not be sufficient to meet the lake’s oxygen demand.

Artificial lake aeration is a technique that adds oxygen to a water body to supplement natural aeration. The practice of aerating lakes began in the 1940s when the concept was first employed to prevent winter fish kills. Over the years, significant testing, research and refinement of various aeration methods has occurred. Today, the most advanced methods include the introduction of air to the bottom of lakes through a series of flexible membrane diffusers or, in lakes less than four feet deep, the utilization of mechanical splashers or fountains that add oxygen near the surface. Aeration systems are recommended when a water body receives urban or agricultural runoff, has a history of low oxygen levels that result in summer and winter fish kills or a blue-green type algae problem.

Bottom diffusers work by lifting low oxygen or anaerobic bottom water to the surface where it is exposed to the atmosphere. At the surface it can lose carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide and adsorb oxygen before leaving the surface and circulating back to the bottom of the lake. An air compressor is set in a metal cabinet on a suitable pad or pole near the shoreline. A self-weighted hose is run from the compressor to the bottom of the lake where it is connected to one or more diffusers. The diffuser’s bubbles are used to entrain the bottom water and lift it toward the surface thus creating an upward circulation. A properly designed system will distribute oxygen throughout the lake. Bottom diffuser systems are highly economical to use as they pump air instead of water and rely on the natural force of the rising air bubbles to circulate the entire water column.

Installing an aeration system requires water testing, lake dimensions, watershed review, experience and knowledge to size the system correctly. Under-powered aeration systems can easily cause more harm than good by raising up nutrient rich water without the capability of re-oxygenating it. Decreased dissolved oxygen levels, fish kills and increased algae growth could result. Lake aeration systems are designed for, and should be run, twenty-four hours per day to maintain necessary oxygen levels throughout the water column. Do not under-budget an aeration system design. For blue-green algae control in a normal depth lake, a target turnover rate equal to .75 to 1.3 gallons per minute is recommended depending on diffuser placement depth and other factors. This rate will generally but not always control blue-green algae problems.

Besides algae control, aeration will greatly improve sport fisheries by allowing fish to expand their range into formerly oxygen deprived portions of the lake. Destratification resulting from increased circulation will permit sport fish to survive and flourish in the bottom areas of the lake. Beneficial insects and other food sources will begin to grow there as a result of the increased oxygen levels.

Another benefit of aeration is control of certain bacteria. Many different kinds of bacteria are found in surface waters but pathogenic bacteria are not normally present. But disease-causing organisms can occasionally enter water from an outside source, which is nearly always of fecal nature. Pathogenic bacteria do not normally reproduce in lakes but usually survive in a transient state making them susceptible to the effects of artificial circulation. These pathogens may be killed with artificial circulation by the resulting increase in oxygen toxicity, the oxidation of fecal or mucous matter, increase in pH or exposure to ultraviolet light when brought to the lake’s surface.

In summary, the advantages of bottom aeration are:

1. Stops low oxygen fish kills, stress and related diseases
2. Improves fisheries by expanding oxygenated habitat
3. Reduces excessive nutrient levels and associated algae growth
4. Increases dissolved oxygen levels
5. Ends thermal stratification
6. Eliminates foul odors from undesirable dissolved gasses
7. Reduces aquatic midge and mosquito insect hatches
8. Destroys pathogenic bacteria
9. Clarifies and circulates water
10. Stops muck accumulation
11. Safe for swimmers and boaters, no electricity in the water
12. Highly efficient with very low operating and maintenance costs

Definitions:

Epilimnion: The upper water portion of a lake above the thermocline
Hypolimnion: The lower water portion of a lake below the thermocline that is stagnant, fairly uniform in temperature and usually low dissolved oxygen except during lake turnover
Thermocline: A narrow layer of water between the Epilimnion and Hypolimnion
Eutrophication: A process whereby water becomes rich in dissolved nutrients and low in dissolved oxygen
Dissolved oxygen: The most crucial measurement of a lake’s health and water quality, a minimum oxygen level of 6.0 parts per million is required at the bottom for a healthy freshwater aquatic ecosystem
Anaerobic: An environment devoid of air or free oxygen
Carbon dioxide: A gas produced by organisms by the process of respiration
Hydrogen sulfide: An odorous and poisonous gas produced by anaerobic bacteria
Pathogenic bacteria: A microorganism capable of causing disease

Sources: Restoration and Management of Lakes and Reservoirs, Second Edition
Lakesmarts, the First Lake Management Handbook
Aquatic Systems, Inc., Water Analysis Definitions
Clean-Flo Labs, Effect of Aeration/Circulation of Lakes Upon Disease Bacteria
_________________________
Cary Martin

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#30474 - 08/04/04 11:13 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
DC41PONDOWNER Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 08/04/04
Posts: 2
Loc: TOMBALL, TX
ALTHOUGH I APPRECIATE THE EDUCATION, I STILL HAVE THE SAME PROBLEM AND DON'T KNOW HOW TO RESOLVE IT. I HAVE BEEN UNSUCCESSFUL IN HIRING ANYONE WHO KNOWS WHAT THEY ARE DOING, IN THE TOMBALL AREA. I NEED TO AERATE. I NEED TO GET RID OF ALGAE. I NEED SUGGESTIONS TO RESOLVE THESE PROBLEMS.

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#30475 - 08/04/04 12:23 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
cmartin Offline
Member

Registered: 10/06/03
Posts: 14
Loc: Orlando, Florida
DC41Pondowner -

Please check your email.
_________________________
Cary Martin

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#30476 - 08/04/04 03:47 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Eric Offline
Lunker

Registered: 11/30/03
Posts: 538
Loc: Rochester NY
cmartin, If you want the spec sheet for the Gast Pump it is as follows.

http://www.gastmfg.com/pdf/rotvane/0532_1032_1532_series.pdf

It is not 1.5 cfm at 5 psi. It is however around 1.25 cfm at 5 psi. It is more than enough for my smaller pond of .25 acres. It is also inexpensive and inexpensive to run ( for my application around $9 /year.)

For those who want a good system and have a smaller pond/application they should consider this as it works and is not going to break the bank.

Also as a note I use Gast pumps in the Industrial plants I am responsible for around the world and they have a great service record and are easy to maintain. Thus what more could you ask for.
_________________________
---------------------------------
1/10 - 1/4 acre pond Upstate NY 14 ft deep


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#30477 - 08/04/04 11:02 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Dick Faurot Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/03/02
Posts: 25
Loc: Bixby, Ok
Sure appreciate all the feedback and advice I have received so far. Based on the recommendations from Cary, Eric, and Bob....decided to bite the bullet and order the GAST from C&H....don't guess $40 will break the bank. Will let you know when I get it installed and running. Since I already have some airstones from the earlier failed attempt and some left over water hose, may try to use that for the rest of the summer, then look into a more long term solution.

Cary - The price on the Brookwood is about the same as the price I was quoted for the GAST from a local distributor. By the way, I did a thermal check of my pond...surface temp out in the middle 91, bottom temp @12' 65....and this has been a mild summer so far. By the way, thanks for the email, look for my response.

One other thing....if Bob Lusk is reading any of this....here is a suggestion. Given all the information, disinformation, and general lack of knowledge on the part of many-myself in particular-in regards to aeration....how about an article or a series of articles in PondBoss explaining the ins & outs, pros & cons, advantages & disadvantages of aeration. This may have been covered before in some more distant publications as my subscription only goes back a couple of years. If so, a refresher should would be helpful.

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#30478 - 08/05/04 07:11 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Bob Koerber Offline
Member

Registered: 04/24/02
Posts: 470
Loc: Hartselle, Alabama
Dick I use one of those tree ring soaker hoses in my application they are cheap and do a good job. You do have to pull it every few month to clean it but I just attach it to the well and run some high pressure water through it. Just attach some 8 ounce egg sinkers with wire and down it goes.

Bob

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#30479 - 08/05/04 08:55 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
bigbukhntr Offline
Member

Registered: 04/28/03
Posts: 14
Isn't Tomball down by Houston? If so, or even if it isnt for that matter, I would contact kelley Dufffie by email. I emailed him and he gave me a line by line, step by step process which cleared up my algae problem in about 3 days. He will ask you the size of your pond and your goals and then recommend the proper chemicals from there. He seems like a very straight up guy, does this kind of stuff for a living, and most of all, he doesnt push his companies products on you. He gives specific product names and isn't really concerned where you purchase them. Most of these guys in here are all professionals, but Kelley is in Houston and is probably familiar with you situation

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#30480 - 08/05/04 09:43 PM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Dick Faurot Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/03/02
Posts: 25
Loc: Bixby, Ok
Bob - I had noticed from reading some of the earlier posts that you were using a tree ring soaker. I also noticed that the soaker hose application seems to have more cons than pros associated with it. Have to wonder how long that tree ring soaker will last....but then again, for the price, it may not matter. Also, do you have a one way valve associated with it to keep water from backfilling into the hose when you are not using it?

Based on what I have read from some of the other posts and some of the professional input I have received, I get the feeling a lot of folks are trying a lot of different things with varying degrees of results. Makes it difficult to arrive at an informed, unbiased, cost-effective solution.

Sure do appreciate all the suggestions. Years ago, who would have thought that having a pond would be this complicated? Sure is fun though.

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#30481 - 08/06/04 07:14 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Bob Koerber Offline
Member

Registered: 04/24/02
Posts: 470
Loc: Hartselle, Alabama
I've been using the same one for a couple of years and can't complain about the cost. Don't use a valve just run it 24/7.

Bob

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#30482 - 08/06/04 10:11 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
TB Offline
Member

Registered: 07/22/02
Posts: 15
If I purchase the Gast pump (2050) for $40, what else will I need for the aeration setup? My pond is 100 ft from the back of my house. I could locate the pump at the back of my house (100' from the pond) or I could run electricity out to the edge of my pond and locate it there. I'm assuming the pump needs to be protected from the weather somehow. Also, what about hoses, etc? Is one hose run from the pump to the pond? These may all be stupid questions, but I am not "mechanically or electrically inclined" so I will need alot of instructions!

Thanks.

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#30483 - 08/06/04 10:57 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
Bob Koerber Offline
Member

Registered: 04/24/02
Posts: 470
Loc: Hartselle, Alabama
Hi TB, the closer the pump is to the pond the better due to friction in the hose. In my setup I am using a plastic shoe box set on a couple of bricks the pump is placed in it I drilled a 3/4 in hole in the side to pass the hose through and a 1/2 in hole for the electrical. Then I place the lid on it and put a large rubbermaid container with holes drilled for the electrical and tubing over the whole think and put a few brick on top to keep it from blowing away. That way it is protected from the elements. For my airline I got 100' of 1/2" plastic tubing at Home Depot and then every few feet wired a used tire weight to it courtesy of my local tire shop to make it sink. The only thing I am missing is a pressure valve in case the bubbler gets clogged but since I clean it quite a bit it hasn't needed it. Hope that helps

Bob

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#30484 - 08/06/04 11:15 AM Re: "Homemade aeration on the Cheap" by Christopher Potts
TB Offline
Member

Registered: 07/22/02
Posts: 15
Thanks, Bob. You mentioned in an earlier post that you use a tree ring soaker hose. Does the 1/2 inch hose connect to the soaker hose?

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