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#204353 - 02/15/10 03:36 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: Bill Cody]
DocFish Offline
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Registered: 01/28/10
Posts: 22
Loc: Ga,USA
HI
Greg said we shouldn't use the HYBRIDS.. I remember genetics class back in the day and kind of lean towards the natural selection approach.

No offence with hybridization technique except.... that's all it seems to be to me at this point.. Biology is a non exact science that's why I love it, but you learn from the mistakes of other's.
Greg recommended the black crappie ,...which i pondered as well but .. couldn't refute so ... black crappie it is. I asked him the hybrid /black crappie mix question too ... outcomes are predictable. ....but i am one of those unpredictable types:) what if ???????????

I always hated the fruit fly lab:) Genetics was a "perfect " science that I believed in until my aunt started raising the Pekingese dog's:) lol .. And yes if I wanted I do have supposed access to a hybrid crappie supplier.
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#204357 - 02/15/10 03:52 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: DocFish]
teehjaeh57 Online   content
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Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 7934
Loc: Lincoln, NE
 Originally Posted By: DocFish
HI
Greg said we shouldn't use the HYBRIDS.. I remember genetics class back in the day and kind of lean towards the natural selection approach.

No offence with hybridization technique except.... that's all it seems to be to me at this point.. Biology is a non exact science that's why I love it, but you learn from the mistakes of other's.
Greg recommended the black crappie ,...which i pondered as well but .. couldn't refute so ... black crappie it is. I asked him the hybrid /black crappie mix question too ... outcomes are predictable. ....but i am one of those unpredictable types:) what if ???????????

I always hated the fruit fly lab:) Genetics was a "perfect " science that I believed in until my aunt started raising the Pekingese dog's:) lol .. And yes if I wanted I do have supposed access to a hybrid crappie supplier.


The scant research available suggested the hybrid characteristics fit my pond scenario well, but each pond is obviously a different story. GG will lead you well - this I know - and I am anxious to learn how your project moves forward. Please keep us up to date - this is valuable for the forum!


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#204380 - 02/15/10 06:53 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: teehjaeh57]
otto Offline
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Registered: 11/02/04
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Loc: texas
This will be of intrest to all of us so please keep us posted.

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#204394 - 02/15/10 07:32 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: otto]
Dave Davidson1 Offline
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Does the black crappie REALLY have less fecundity than the white?
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#204396 - 02/15/10 07:38 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: Dave Davidson1]
teehjaeh57 Online   content
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DD

The only differences I am aware of is WC are more tolerant of turbidity, and BC will focus on Zooplankton as forage more so than the WC. I have HEARD BC fecundity is lower, but have absolutely no experience to back that up. I do personally prefer the BC...but that's not a factor here.
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#204413 - 02/15/10 09:37 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: teehjaeh57]
HoneyHole Offline
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Registered: 07/22/08
Posts: 100
Loc: AL
DOCFISH,
I hated the fruit fly lab with a passion also. Your post brings back memories I had tried to forget. Fruit flies are something no college student wants to babysit.

-HH
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#204442 - 02/16/10 01:11 AM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: HoneyHole]
CJBS2003 Offline
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Interesting info from an Alabama study...

Black crappie Pomoxis nigromaculatus and white crappie P. annularis often experience dramatic variation in year-class strength, making their management difficult. We sought to identify factors influencing age-0 crappie in an effort to better understand their variable recruitment. Toward this end we quantified adult crappie fecundity, zooplankton abundance, growth and survival of larval and postlarval crappie, and weather and hydrologic factors within three lakes of varying trophic state hypereutrophic Lake Weiss, eutrophic Jones Bluff Lake, and mesotrophic Lake Martin. Reproductive crappie in Martin were older, but had lower relative weight (Wr), and lower mean gonadosomatic index (GSI) values than in the other lakes. In Weiss, crappie were youngest and shortest, but had the highest GSI and Wr values. Jones Bluff crappie were longest, but lowest in Wr and intermediate in age and GSI. While both GSI and fecundity were positively correlated with lake productivity, larval crappie density was either unrelated to or inversely related to GSI. Although collected larvae were of similar age and size, larval growth and survival both appeared to be positively correlated with lake productivity. Juvenile crappie in Jones Bluff grew fastest. These results suggest that recruitment may not be limited by adult spawning potential and there may exist a bottleneck during crappie early life stages in less productive lakes. Gear comparisons indicated that bottom trawling and electrofishing were not viable methods for sampling YOY crappie in our lakes, and a neuston net, although effective for capturing age-0 individuals of several species, was only useful for collecting crappie in shallow areas. Trap nets remained the most effective gear for estimating age-0 crappie abundances in the fall, and an experimental small mesh trap net proved effective in capturing smaller fish including age-0 crappie.
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#204493 - 02/16/10 01:14 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: CJBS2003]
bobad Offline
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Registered: 06/02/05
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Loc: Eunice, Louisiana
Travis,

Around here, it's believed that crappie are creatures of large and "changing" waters, and wait for a flood to spawn. In other words, if they're trapped in a small, clear, unchanging pond, they wait for more advantageous water conditions to spawn.

Not saying I ascribe totally to that theory, but it makes sense to me.
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#204495 - 02/16/10 01:34 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: bobad]
CJBS2003 Offline
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I can understand the thinking behind that as well. I can even see it occurring here in the Mid-Atlantic as well. There is a lot about crappie biology we really don't know. I love catching and eating crappies. I really wish they were more user friendly in smaller ponds. Unfortunately, they stunt badly even in bigger lakes in my area. Not many lakes in my area with decent sized crappie under 1000 acres. Maybe that is partly due to them be too successful at spawning in smaller BOW's and less successful in bigger BOW's?
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#204588 - 02/17/10 12:54 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: CJBS2003]
bobad Offline
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 Originally Posted By: CJBS2003
Maybe that is partly due to them be too successful at spawning in smaller BOW's and less successful in bigger BOW's?


I can imagine that in a large BOW, predators gradually increase in number until the crappie are kept in check. In a small BOW, I imagine the predators are highly vulnerable to the crappie. I imagine crappie of all sizes eat everything from eggs right on up to 6" young of the predators. You would be forced to not take out any big LMB, and do plenty of crappie fishing.


Edited by bobad (02/17/10 12:56 PM)

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#204593 - 02/17/10 01:23 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: bobad]
CJBS2003 Offline
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The use of crappies in ponds is such a challenge. My observation is, many ponds that are stocked with crappie are stocked by hands off pond owners. Either they just stock a few adult crappies caught from another BOW or they stock a batch of fingerlings with the bass early on and never manage the pond after. If a pond owner stocked crappies in a pond, and then actively managed it utilizing methods we know could help control their numbers if crappies could be more of a possibility. I have no idea if this idea would work, but if I tried to stock crappies into a pond I would do this. As with northern ponds, the LMB are often stocked before the BG. This is to give them a chance to get some size on them to help control any BG offspring. Well, in the case of crappie, give the bass a 3 or even 4 year jump on the crappie. Wait 3 or 4 years after the bass are stocked in a new pond before adding crappie. But you really have to want crappie in your pond to take that kind of risk... My experience with crappie in ponds is either feast or famine. When they spawn either they don't produce any offspring or they produce way too many... This in it off itself makes crappie so hard to manage is small ponds.
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#204699 - 02/18/10 12:28 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: CJBS2003]
bobad Offline
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 Quote:
Well, in the case of crappie, give the bass a 3 or even 4 year jump on the crappie. Wait 3 or 4 years after the bass are stocked in a new pond before adding crappie.


Or,,, maybe stock just a few crappie at the same time as stocking the LMB.

I'm watching my crappie nervously. Some of them did spawn last spring, because I accidentally caught some babies in a trap. Those same babies should be ~6" by now, but I haven't caught a single one on hook and line. I guess most of them got eaten by the LMB. As soon as I start catching new generation on hook and line, I'm going to start bringing the pressure. That's very easy to do, my wife is a fishing machine.
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#204879 - 02/20/10 06:23 AM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: bobad]
otto Offline
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Registered: 11/02/04
Posts: 1074
Loc: texas
The crappie may be hard to manage but they are fun to catch especially when they are spawning,( which is soon) and great to eat.
Otto


Edited by Dave Davidson1 (02/21/10 07:05 AM)

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#205922 - 02/27/10 02:24 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: otto]
DocFish Offline
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Registered: 01/28/10
Posts: 22
Loc: Ga,USA
Ok Guys Greg is about to order an aerator and a fountain for the crappie pond . I have been busy building my own structure out of 6 foot cattle fence post.
We are concerned because I surveyed the pond depths yesterday and the max depth was only four feet. So I know that the HB might not like the summer water temps if they get too high. So we are hoping to counter this problem with the aerator and fountaintain(keeping the water moving).

Any ideas?

Doc
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#206168 - 03/01/10 02:32 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: DocFish]
Greg Grimes Offline
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Doc, also I wonder if we can drill a well in your area? Aren't you close to the river? If so you could run well water in heat of summer to help with the heat.

Cody, the only supplier of the hybrid crappie was Ken's and I do not trust enough to get what Doc paid for from that source.

Basically I picked black crappie due to arguements of success for both sides. That being said aviailibility of black is better so what we decided to go with.
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#206973 - 03/07/10 10:58 AM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: Greg Grimes]
DocFish Offline
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Registered: 01/28/10
Posts: 22
Loc: Ga,USA
update everthing ordered and the experiment officially begins next week guys. ill keep u posted. In theory it can be done.

DocFish
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#206978 - 03/07/10 11:39 AM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: DocFish]
Omaha Offline
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 Originally Posted By: DocFish
update everthing ordered and the experiment officially begins next week guys. ill keep u posted. In theory it can be done.

DocFish


Thanks Doc. Very interested to see how it goes.
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#207044 - 03/07/10 11:08 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: Omaha]
n8ly Offline
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I know it can be done very easily. I have GREAT success stocking crappie in small ponds. Sometimes they dont spawn for years at a time, but sometimes they have a spawn that is simply overwhelming. That aspect of managing them is pretty unpredictable, but your success will depend on your goals and time spent on the water. If HSB are just for crappie predator I definitely think you should scale back feeding to a very low dose during the spring and summer months, but still keep feeding them just a small bit for supplement.

My best success with growing HUGE crappie in a small pond is to stock about a dozen or two adult crappie per acre into an established pond. Those fish routinely grow into 14-16" crappie real quick.

I havent stocked just a crappie pond though, but definitely want to. I just need to come up with an empty pond this spring and someone willing for an experiment like what you got going Doc! I have a feeling you will thoroughly enjoy the process for years to come, please keep us updated. (BTW, if you do need to harvest small crappies in your pond, I can teach Greg a few tricks for doing that pretty quickly!)
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#207060 - 03/08/10 07:34 AM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: n8ly]
Greg Grimes Offline
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good one Nate! We will have to put our fishing skills to the test sometime soon. You got me on outings per year for last ten years but me being much older you have lots of catching up to do my friend.

We will keep folks posted. Also wanted to add Malone's hatchery (thanks Todd O) had hybrid crappie available. After discussion with Doc we stayed with black- stocked this friday. He wants to catch some so if hybrid did little breeding he would have to restock later thus the decsion for black and sustained fishery. Knowing they have hybrid variety I will try them in other ponds in the near future.
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#207073 - 03/08/10 09:43 AM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: Greg Grimes]
ewest Offline
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Registered: 03/08/05
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Long but worth the read if you want the skinny on sources of info and main ideas on Crappie.

http://www.pondboss.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=62560&fpart=10

AFS has had 3 symposia on Crappie covering many years of research. Here is a historical of the papers which will show you the ideas that have come up and a glimpse of the results. I have included some parts and omitted others including the list of authorities.


Challenges of Crappie Management Continuing into the
21st Century
JEFF BOXRUCKER*
ELISE IRWIN

White crappie Pomoxis annularis and black
crappie P. nigromaculatus are among the principle
species sought by anglers in the midwestern and
southeastern United States. The focus of management
activities aimed at improving crappie fisheries
has shifted over the years, and the published
literature reflects this shift. Three symposia on
crappies sponsored by the American Fisheries Society
have been significant contributors to the body
of knowledge on crappie ecology and management.
The third in this series, entitled ‘‘Challenges
of Crappie Management Continuing into the 21st
Century,’’ was held at the society’s 130th Annual
Meeting in St. Louis, Missouri, in 2000. The organizers’
objective was to compile the most current
work on crappie ecology and management and
help set the direction for research in the next decade.
This
introduction will try to show how the focus of
research has shifted and the role that these symposia
have played in that shift.

Mitzner (1984) identified the ‘‘small-crappie
syndrome’’ as a common theme in papers from the
first crappie symposium, ‘‘Crappie Management:
Problems and Solutions,’’ which was held at the
44th Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference in
1982. As early as the 1940s, management activities
centered on reducing abundance through mechanical
or chemical removal. These techniques have
been used sparingly over the past 30 years because
of their high costs and short-term benefits. Investigations
of the interactions within crappie trophic
communities (O’Brien et al. 1984; Ellison 1984)
published in the first symposium led Mitzner
(1984) to conclude that management activities
were moving toward prey management. Published
accounts of the effects of prey stockings on crappie
population structure range from beneficial effects
on community food webs (Bartholomew 1966; Li
et al. 1976; Mosher 1984) to neutral effects (Boxrucker
1986; Boxrucker 1993; Hale 1996) and potentially
negative effects (Crowl and Boxrucker
1989; DeVries and Stein 1990; Guest et al. 1990;
DeVries et al. 1991). Mitzner (1984) also set the
stage for another shift in management strategies
by pointing out that managing angler harvest has
the potential to rectify the small-crappie syndrome.
A second crappie symposium, entitled ‘‘Crappie
Biology and Management,’’ was held
in 1990. Many of the papers published in connection
with this symposium were descriptive in nature,
with the topics including culture (Smeltzer
and Flickinger 1991), aging (Hammers and Miranda
1991; Sweatman and Kohler 1991), movements
and habitat use (Markham et al. 1991), relative
weight (Neumann and Murphy 1991), and
population characteristics (McDonough and Buchanan
1991; McInerny and Degan 1991; Colvin
1991a). The first accounts of the effects of minimum
length limits on crappie population structure
were published in the proceedings of this symposium
(Colvin 1991b; Webb and Ott 1991). Reed
and Davies (1991) and Larson et al. (1991), also
participants in this symposium, cautioned against
the use of restrictive harvest regulations due to the
high levels of natural mortality seen in some crappie
populations in Alabama and Georgia. Published
accounts of the use of length limits to manage
crappie fisheries increased following this symposium
(Allen and Miranda 1995; Allen et al.
1998; Maceina et al. 1998; Hale et al. 1999; Boxrucker
2001). The use of length limits in crappie
fisheries has been refined, with either a 229-mm
or a 254-mm limit being used depending on the
population’s growth rate. Equilibrium yield models
have assisted in refining the use of length limits
(Maceina et al. 1998; Slipke and Maceina 2001).
Currently, 15 of 27 states in the Northcentral and
Southern Divisions of the American Fisheries Society
manage crappie fisheries with length limits.
Crappie recruitment was historically thought to
be cyclic, with strong year-classes being produced
every 2 to 5 years (Swingle and Swingle 1967).
However, despite the importance of crappies as
sport fish, little research into the factors affecting
their recruitment has been published. Environmental
variables were identified as possible influences
on year-class strength (Jenkins 1955; Goodson
1966; Mathur et al. 1979), yet little cause-andeffect
data were presented. In the first crappie symposium,
O’Brien et al. (1984) discussed the effects
of abiotic factors on the survival of early life stages.
In the second crappie symposium, Mitzner
(1991) presented the relationships between crappie
year-class strength and various environmental variables,
including water level, turbidity, substratum,
and wind.
Crappie recruitment dynamics were the focus of
an increasing amount of research in the 1990s.
Water temperature influences spawning times and
subsequent growth and survival, with later-hatching
cohorts experiencing higher temperatures,
growth, and survival (Pine and Allen 2001). Dubuc
and DeVries (2002) failed to identify consistent
relationships between reservoir productivity and
larval crappie density. Guy and Willis (1995)
found differences in the recruitment variability of
crappies in South Dakota based on landscape characteristics.
Recruitment was less variable in systems
with high shoreline development indices (i.e.,
more embayments). The recruitment of black crappies
in South Dakota was also less variable in systems
with high watershed : water body surface area
ratios (Guy and Willis 1995). Water level fluctuations
have increasingly been suggested as a primary
influence on crappie recruitment. High inflows
and subsequent water releases in spring and
summer can lead to the reduced recruitment of
crappies (Pope et al. 1996; Maceina and Stimpert
1998). High winter water levels had a positive influence
on crappie year-class strength in Alabama
tributary impoundments (Maceina and Stimpert
1998), yet the mechanisms underlying this relationship
are not clear. Allen and Miranda (2001)
used a population model to conclude that crappie
recruitment was quasi-cyclic due to random fluctuations
in the environmental variables and density-
dependent mechanisms. Allen and Miranda
(1998) developed an age-structured model to help
explain the effects of erratic recruitment on crappie
management alternatives, particularly the use of
length limits.
Information from the two previous symposia on
crappies set the stage for the papers from this symposium.
Whereas the majority of manuscripts from
the 1990 symposium were descriptive, most of
those that follow evaluate management strategies.
Six of the papers deal with exploitation. Estimates
of exploitation were typically made from tagreturn
data and were subsequently used in conjunction
with catch curves to estimate natural mortality
rates. This information was then used to
model the potential effects of length limits on crappie
fisheries (Boxrucker 2002a, this issue; Isermann
et al. 2002a, this issue). Miranda et al. (2002,
this issue) found that the uncertainty surrounding
estimates of tagging mortality, tag loss, and particularly
reporting rate led to imprecise estimates
of exploitation in spite of the high costs of data
collection. These authors suggested that indirect
measures of exploitation (i.e., condition, total mortality
estimates, length and age distributions, and
increased recruitment variability) be used rather
than expensive tag-and-reward programs. Isermann
et al. (2002a) used equilibrium yield models
to evaluate Tennessee’s statewide 254-mm minimum
length limit on the yield of crappie fisheries.
The authors grouped the study reservoirs into three
categories: those in which 229-mm or 254-mm
length limits would increase yield, albeit at the
expense of the number of crappies harvested; those
in which length limits had no impact on yield; and
those that were negatively impacted by length limits.
The authors suggested that applying length
limits to fisheries using a categorical approach was
preferable to using a single, areawide regulation.
Bister et al. (2002, this issue) and Hurley and Jackson
(2002, this issue) reported decreased growth
rates in crappie populations in South Dakota and
Nebraska, respectively, as a result of length limit
regulations. The 229-mm length limit was removed
from Lake Alvin, South Dakota (Bister et
al. 2002), while Hurley and Jackson (2002) recommended
removing the 254-mm length limit
from two small Nebraska impoundments for only
a portion of the year to help maintain crappie densities.
Boxrucker (2002a) detailed population and
angler creel characteristics prior to, during, and
after the removal of a 254-mm length limit at an
Oklahoma reservoir. Even though the abundance
of quality- and preferred-size crappies and angler
catch rates improved as a result of the length limit,
angler dissatisfaction with the regulation led to its
removal. This is in contrast to the positive angler
sentiment in regards to harvest restrictions in the
Sardis Lake, Mississippi, crappie fishery (Dorr et
al. 2002, this issue).
Recruitment has been a common theme in all
three crappie symposia. McKeown and Mooradian
(2002, this issue) found that neither the low
density of adult stocks nor the overwinter mortality
of age-0 crappies was the cause of reduced
recruitment (relative to historical levels) in Chautauqua
Lake, New York. The authors concluded
that management efforts aimed at increasing adult
density would have little effect on recruitment
and the subsequent recovery of the fishery to historical
levels. Sammons et al. (2002, this issue)
found that crappie recruitment in Tennessee tributary
impoundments was positively related to
high water levels during the prespawning period
(January through March). Maciena and Stimpert
(1998) found a similar relationship in Alabama
tributary impoundments.
Two papers in this symposium dealt with supplemental
stocking, a little-used technique to improve
crappie recruitment. The results of stocking
black-nosed crappies (a morphological variant of
the black crappie) in Tennessee impoundments
were mixed, with contributions to year-class
strength ranging from 0% to 93% (Isermann et al.
2002b, this issue). Racey and Lochmann (2002,
this issue) determined that the year-class contribution
of white crappies stocked into Lake Chicot,
Arkansas, ranged from 0% to 3.1% and concluded
that other management options to improve adult
abundance should be considered.
Stocking predators to reduce the abundance of
slowly growing populations of crappies was the
topic of two papers in this symposium. The concept
was introduced by Willis et al. (1984) in the
first crappie symposium. Saugeyes (walleye Stizostedion
vitreum 3 sauger S. canadense) were
stocked into Richmond Lake, South Dakota, to improve
the size structure of a black crappie population
(Galinat et al. 2002, this issue) and into
Thunderbird Reservoir, Oklahoma, to improve that
of a slowly growing white crappie population
(Boxrucker 2002b, this issue). The growth rates
and size structure of both crappie populations improved
following the introduction of the saugeyes.
Boxrucker (2002b) cautioned that consideration
must be given to the effects of such biomanipulation
on all trophic levels and that thorough evaluations
need to be conducted both before and after
implementing it.
Spier and Heidinger (2002, this issue) investigated
the effects of turbidity on the growth of juvenile
and adult black and white crappies. No differences
were found in the growth of juveniles,
but the weight gain of adult black crappies was
higher than that of adult white crappies at low
turbidity.
The importance of crappies as sport fish ensures
that research into their ecology and management
will continue. Recruitment dynamics appear to be
the focus of current work, with water level manipulation
having the potential to significantly impact
year-class strength. The expanded use of
population models will assist managers in selectively
applying harvest regulations. Many crappie
populations have a high rate of natural mortality
that negates the potential benefits of length limits,
even when there is fast growth and high exploitation.
Research into the causative mechanisms in
populations exhibiting high natural mortality will
broaden management alternatives.
Acknowledgments
This symposium was sponsored by the Fisheries
Management Section of the American Fisheries
Society.
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#207267 - 03/09/10 08:20 AM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: ewest]
cheyenne19 Offline
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Registered: 05/11/07
Posts: 258
Loc: Arkansas
 Originally Posted By: ewest
Greg have you seen the SEP info on their success with this approach. Might want to call Jeff. They use FH , TShad , crappie and HSB. IMO you will need to use several approaches at different times to adjust the plan to what is happing in the water. There are too many variables for any one size fits all plan to work. I would hold off on the BG at first. You may need to limit feeding during the period just before the crappie spawn and for several mths after to force the HSB and GShiners to go after the crappie.



I can't make any claims as to how this may work. With the help of Jeff at SEP we are on this same track. In three years we have been able to convert stunted WC into consistent 3/4lb-1 3/4lb fish in a 37ac BOW. There cannot be one recipe for success with WC. And according to Jeff there is so much going on in my pond that's it's almost too complex to understand.

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#207278 - 03/09/10 09:36 AM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: cheyenne19]
ewest Offline
Moderator
Hall of Fame 2014

Lunker

Registered: 03/08/05
Posts: 19649
Loc: Miss.
 Originally Posted By: cheyenne19

... according to Jeff there is so much going on in my pond that's it's almost too complex to understand.


I agree with Jeff completely. With that many species and the situation it is more like a big reservoir than a pond or lake. We all know that even among reservoirs that look the same some have good crappie results and some don’t.

I will point out for everyone that there is a big difference between a short term change in one lake and a pond strategy that FS can suggest for others. It takes long term data and positive results replicated many times to get there. Jeff will tell you they are in the very early stages on their crappie experiment but so far so good. Your results are good source of ongoing info for them and us. Please keep us up to date on what happens - even the small stuff as there is a lot of interest in making crappie work.

I have a suggestion. Let's talk to Bob and Jeff and see about a PB mag story on your lake/results. It would make great reading.



Edited by ewest (03/09/10 09:39 AM)
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#207317 - 03/09/10 01:36 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: ewest]
cheyenne19 Offline
Lunker

Registered: 05/11/07
Posts: 258
Loc: Arkansas
If I understand you correctly, that my results aren't longterm enough so show much and shouldn't be used as a guide line, then I totally agree. What we are doing seems to be working, but there is no evidence to show that it will continue. Jeff spoke with me once before about doing an article for PB about it, he then considered doing his conference speech about it. I'm happy to help in any way that I can.

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#207321 - 03/09/10 02:04 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: cheyenne19]
ewest Offline
Moderator
Hall of Fame 2014

Lunker

Registered: 03/08/05
Posts: 19649
Loc: Miss.
 Originally Posted By: cheyenne19
If I understand you correctly, that my results aren't longterm enough so show much and shouldn't be used as a guide line, then I totally agree. What we are doing seems to be working, but there is no evidence to show that it will continue. Jeff spoke with me once before about doing an article for PB about it, he then considered doing his conference speech about it. I'm happy to help in any way that I can.


I should clarify. I think your results are great and are important info for many purposes. I hope they stay long term and continue to be a source of promise. They are a guideline. They may not be applicable to most small ponds however for obvious reasons. I think SEP's much simpler approach (fewer species and plan) may be a better guideline for smaller ponds. I will talk to Bob and see if I can start the process on a joint article with you and Jeff. You should start by writing down a history of the lake. Include a descriptive narrative of the history (family property) and basic facts (size , shape , depth , species , management etc). Also start picking out a few pics that will tell the story (not just big fish pics). That can be the starting point. I will be glad to facilitate the effort.
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#207392 - 03/09/10 09:58 PM Re: Crappie experiment [Re: ewest]
teehjaeh57 Online   content
Chairman, Pond Boss Legacy award; Moderator; field correspondent
Lunker

Registered: 01/22/08
Posts: 7934
Loc: Lincoln, NE
 Originally Posted By: ewest
 Originally Posted By: cheyenne19

... according to Jeff there is so much going on in my pond that's it's almost too complex to understand.


I agree with Jeff completely. With that many species and the situation it is more like a big reservoir than a pond or lake. We all know that even among reservoirs that look the same some have good crappie results and some don’t.

I will point out for everyone that there is a big difference between a short term change in one lake and a pond strategy that FS can suggest for others. It takes long term data and positive results replicated many times to get there. Jeff will tell you they are in the very early stages on their crappie experiment but so far so good. Your results are good source of ongoing info for them and us. Please keep us up to date on what happens - even the small stuff as there is a lot of interest in making crappie work.

I have a suggestion. Let's talk to Bob and Jeff and see about a PB mag story on your lake/results. It would make great reading.


This research is needed by the pond management industry. Please colaborate on something - we need this information!
_________________________
Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. ~ Henry David Thoreau





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