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#167568 - 06/09/09 12:06 PM Bluegill diseases
MrSandman Offline
Lunker

Registered: 01/27/09
Posts: 127
Loc: Northern Ohio
Last April '08 the drain pipe of my 6 acre pond collapsed and I lost 60% of my water. We did immediate repairs and by mid May the pond was back up to full pool. I noticed however that many BG and LMB had red sores last year. I attributed the condition to stress from overcrowding and lack of oxygen and consequently opportunistic infection.

However, this year with a healthy water level, I've again noticed that about 50% of the bluegill caught have red sores of varying severity. Another smaller percentage have some kind of raised, bumpy fungus-like stuff on their bodies. This fungus-like stuff has been around for several years however.

Here I'll attempt to post photos of the red sores on two BG, and the "bumpy fungus" of another BG. Can anyone venture a guess on the nature of these diseases? From reading other posts and links here, I suspect that the red sores are just that, "red sore disease" (aeromonas hydrophila). But I've never found anything on the "bumpy fungus."

Thanks to anyone who cares to jump in.







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#167569 - 06/09/09 12:12 PM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: MrSandman]
MrSandman Offline
Lunker

Registered: 01/27/09
Posts: 127
Loc: Northern Ohio
PS... I didn't mean to post the above in the Muddy Water forum but in the Questions & Observations forum. My apologies.

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#167581 - 06/09/09 02:23 PM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: MrSandman]
Theo Gallus Offline
Moderator
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Registered: 05/14/04
Posts: 12405
Loc: Central Ohio
I moved it for you, MrSandman. No problem, no charge, and no apology necessary.
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"Live like you'll die tomorrow, but manage your grass like you'll live forever."
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#167606 - 06/09/09 04:41 PM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: Theo Gallus]
MrSandman Offline
Lunker

Registered: 01/27/09
Posts: 127
Loc: Northern Ohio
Thanks Theo! But, you moved it to Soil Questions? LOL

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#167625 - 06/09/09 05:52 PM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: MrSandman]
Theo Gallus Offline
Moderator
Lunker

Registered: 05/14/04
Posts: 12405
Loc: Central Ohio
Dam floating drop down menus.
_________________________
"Live like you'll die tomorrow, but manage your grass like you'll live forever."
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#167662 - 06/09/09 10:26 PM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: Theo Gallus]
Cecil Baird1 Offline
Hall of Fame

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Registered: 08/08/02
Posts: 20043
Loc: Northeastern Indiana
Spawning stress! Not sure about the globbules but they are probably some kind of parasite?

If you catch another one with either problem mix up a 3 percent solution of salt in a bucket (3 gallons of water in a 5 gallon bucket mixed with 12 oz. of uniodized table salt weight not volume), and dip the fish in for 15 to 30 seconds or until the fish loses equilibrium. Most likely any external parasite will implode.


A 3 percent salt dip effectively removes protozoa from the skin, gills, and fins of freshwater fish; it also enhances mucus production. Depending on the species, fish can remain in a 3 percent salt solution from 30 seconds to 10 minutes. In general, fish should be left in the salt solution until they lose equilibrium and roll over. When this happens, the fish should be quickly removed from the salt solution and placed in clean, untreated water. Because some species (notably, some tetras) do not tolerate salt well, a bioassay (a test to determine safe concentration) should be conducted before large numbers of these fish are treated.

If dipping is not feasible, freshwater fish may be placed in a brackish water (i.e., 1 percent salt) solution for 30 minutes up to several hours. This procedure produces the same effects as a saltwater dip; that is, it removes external parasites (protozoa) and enhances mucus production. It also benefits fish recovering from skin wounds.


http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/VM007



Edited by Cecil Baird1 (06/09/09 10:34 PM)
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#167718 - 06/10/09 10:37 AM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: Cecil Baird1]
MrSandman Offline
Lunker

Registered: 01/27/09
Posts: 127
Loc: Northern Ohio
Thanks Cecil! Spawning stress does sound logical, especially as to the red sores. I've never heard of a treatment like you suggested, but what I like about it is that it's easy! Even I can do it.

It may be interesting to note that my neighbor, who also has a pond built upstream on the same feeder creek, says that his BG also have those gray "globbules". By the way, they can be scraped off with a fingernail.

Thanks again.

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#167796 - 06/10/09 06:27 PM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: Cecil Baird1]
Captain1 Offline
Lunker

Registered: 12/12/06
Posts: 340
Loc: East Texas, Mineola
 Originally Posted By: Cecil Baird1

If you catch another one with either problem mix up a 3 percent solution of salt in a bucket and dip the fish in for 15 to 30 seconds or until the fish loses equilibrium.



... and then when the fish rolls over to opposite side, apply pepper, deep fry and eat.
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"Our Life is frittered away by detail. Simplify, Simplify" -Henry David Thoreau -

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#168600 - 06/16/09 10:50 AM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: Captain1]
2trackin Offline
Lunker

Registered: 06/16/09
Posts: 62
Loc: SW Michigan
My BG have the same gray globbules. Any body know exaclty what it is?


Edited by 2trackin (06/16/09 10:51 AM)

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#168739 - 06/16/09 11:49 PM Re: Bluegill diseases [Re: 2trackin]
Cecil Baird1 Offline
Hall of Fame

Lunker

Registered: 08/08/02
Posts: 20043
Loc: Northeastern Indiana
 Originally Posted By: 2trackin
My BG have the same gray globbules. Any body know exaclty what it is?


The only thing I've seen that looks like that are snail eggs. However I've only seen snails attach to dead fish not live ones.
_________________________
If pigs could fly bacon would be harder to come by and there would be a lot of damaged trees.







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