Pond Boss Magazine
http://www.pondboss.com/images/userfiles/image/20130301193901_6_150by50orangewhyshouldsubscribejpeg.jpg
Advertisment
Newest Members
Kellyann, Patriot Scott, HookedUp, BasssinOk, George Haddaway
16018 Registered Users
Forum Stats
16019 Members
36 Forums
36735 Topics
500203 Posts

Max Online: 1210 @ 08/23/18 11:01 PM
Top Posters
esshup 24033
Cecil Baird1 20043
ewest 19841
Dave Davidson1 13869
Bill Cody 12808
Who's Online
24 registered (Pat Williamson, Joey Quarry, ewest, d-a, Heppy, Cisco, bassmaster61, Aroux, roundy, Quarter Acre, ShortCut, Redonthehead, jpws, DannyMac, BasssinOk, Freg, Downrigger56304, Mike Whatley, rovenorth, RStringer, wbuffetjr, Augie, Brettski, Clay N' Pray), 205 Guests and 632 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Topic Options
#108704 - 02/20/08 04:10 PM Yellow bass
Gambusia Offline
Lunker

Registered: 12/06/04
Posts: 315
Loc: Western North Carolina
Can Morone mississippiensis live and reproduce in small ponds?

Top
#108840 - 02/21/08 02:51 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Gambusia]
Theo Gallus Online   content
Moderator
Lunker

Registered: 05/14/04
Posts: 12434
Loc: Central Ohio
Bump.

 Quote:
The yellow bass inhabits large rivers and their backwaters, lakes, and quiet pools (Clay 1975; Douglas 1974; Eddy and Underhill 1974; Etnier and Starnes 1993; Pflieger 1997; Phillips et. al. 1982; Robison and Buchanan 1988;). It is a schooling fish characteristic of sluggish waters, but may be found in rapids or gravel-bottomed open water when it spawns (Clay 1975; Etnier and Starnes 1993; Phillips et. al. 1982). It tolerates varying turbidity, but prefers clearer water with vegetation (Etnier and Starnes 1993; Robison and Buchanan 1988). In Iowa, it inhabits clear to slightly turbid waters over a firm bottom of sand, gravel, rubble and mud (Harlan et al. 1987).


 Quote:
Spawning habitat: Gravelly bottoms in waters 0.6-0.9m deep (Burgess 1980; Pflieger 1997). Phytolithophils; nonobligatory plant spawner that deposit eggs on submerged items (Simon 1999; Balon 1981).

Reproductive strategy: While spawning, the female lies partly on her right side and ejects eggs toward the male, who remains upright over her and fertilizes the eggs as they are released; females do not release their entire egg complement in a single spawning (Burnham 1909). The eggs hatch in 4 to 6 days at a temperature of 21 degrees C, and yolk sac is absorbed in 4 days (Burgess 1980; Pflieger 1997; Carlander 1997). Phytolithophils have late hatching larvae with cement glands in free embryos, have larvae with moderately developed respiratory structures, and have larvae that are photophobic (Simon 1999; Balon 1981).


If I had to guess based upon on-line literature, I'd say reproduction would be iffy. IIRC some Texas PMs here have pretty good knowledge of Yellow Bass.
_________________________
"Live like you'll die tomorrow, but manage your grass like you'll live forever."
-S. M. Stirling

Top
#108855 - 02/21/08 04:41 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Theo Gallus]
Shorty Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/28/05
Posts: 4335
Loc: Raymond, NE
http://www.outdoorcentral.com/mc/pr/04/02/03c2.asp

DNR Battling Yellow Bass Problem in Southern Iowa Lakes

 Quote:
Yellow bass is a small panfish that, once introduced to a lake, can completely take over the fish population within a few years. These fish are able to reproduce when they reach five to six inches and aggressively feed on the eggs of nest laying fish, like largemouth bass and bluegills. They will also eat the newly hatched larvae of those species as well as crappies.

"I have seen a school of yellow bass follow a female crappie and feed on her eggs as she deposits them," said Chris Larson, fisheries biologist at Cold Springs, near Atlantic.

Yellow bass can get so numerous in a system that no other fish can grow. They negatively impact other species through competition or even direct predation. Yellows can get so thick, in fact, that the food in the system cannot support their own population, causing the yellow bass to become stunted, rarely getting to angler acceptable size of 8 inches.

Larson has seen first hand how yellow bass can destroy a lake. He eradicated the entire fish population at Lake Anita last fall to get rid of yellow bass. The lake has been restocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, crappie and channel catfish. Unfortunately, it will take a few years for the fish to grow large enough before anglers will return. Before yellow bass took over Lake Anita, the lake had an estimated impact of $750,000 each year to the state and local economy.

"The only way I know how to manage yellow bass is at the bottom of a Rotenone barrel," Larson said. "And you will basically lose your fishery for a couple of years."

At Lake Icaria, largemouth bass are outnumbered 2,000 to 1. "At those numbers, largemouth bass can't protect a nest to get a spawn off. Bluegills face the same problem," Sobotka said. Sobotka has surveyed Icaria and estimates there are 392 largemouth bass, 668 walleye, 12,600 bluegill, and 784,000 yellow bass.

"Domination doesn't do justice to describe what yellow bass do to these southern Iowa lakes," Sobotka said. "It's worse than domination."

Sobotka and Larson have been talking with neighboring states to see what they are trying to address the yellow bass problem. Nebraska tried over-stocking largemouth bass in affected lakes and all they found was skinny largemouth bass and no impact on yellow bass.

Larson and Sobotka have studied predator species - largemouth bass, walleye, channel catfish - and although these fish are eating a few yellow bass, they are looking elsewhere for the primary food sources. A stomach analysis of more than 200 largemouth bass at Viking Lake this past summer reveled that largemouth bass do not feed effectively on yellow bass. In fact no, yellow bass were consumed by largemouth bass even though they are the dominant prey species in the lake.

Part of the problem may be that yellow bass and these predators do not frequent the same habitats in a lake. Another may be the spiny make up of the yellows. Or another may be the fish simply don't like the taste of them. Whatever the reason is, predator stockings is not the answer.

So far, there is no solution other than total renovation



From what I can tell yellow bass are very much like the dreaded white perch we have in a few public lakes in NE, you don't want them present in any body of water.
_________________________


Top
#108858 - 02/21/08 05:01 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Shorty]
Sunil Offline
Moderator
Ambassador
Field Correspondent
Hall of Fame 2014

Lunker

Registered: 09/03/03
Posts: 11623
Loc: Somerset, PA
Anyone have a picture of a yellow bass?
_________________________
Excerpt from Robert Crais' "The Monkey's Raincoat:"
"She took another microscopic bite of her sandwich, then pushed it away. Maybe she absorbed nutrients from her surroundings."


Top
#108860 - 02/21/08 05:09 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Sunil]
Shorty Offline
Lunker

Registered: 07/28/05
Posts: 4335
Loc: Raymond, NE


http://www.agfc.com/wildlife-conservation/fish/bass-fish/black-bass-fish.aspx

 Quote:
Yellow bass are found primarily in the natural lakes and large warm-water rivers of Arkansas' eastern and southern lowlands. They are popular sportfish in some states, but most Arkansas anglers consider them a small-sized nuisance, because they are aggressive bait-stealers and seldom weigh more than a quarter pound.

The yellow bass most closely resembles the white bass, but there are not teeth on the tongue, and the golden-yellow sides have dark stripes sharply broken and offset above the front of the anal fin.

_________________________


Top
#108869 - 02/21/08 06:42 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Shorty]
Theo Gallus Online   content
Moderator
Lunker

Registered: 05/14/04
Posts: 12434
Loc: Central Ohio
 Quote:
"The only way I know how to manage yellow bass is at the bottom of a Rotenone barrel," Larson said.

Gnarly.
_________________________
"Live like you'll die tomorrow, but manage your grass like you'll live forever."
-S. M. Stirling

Top
#108870 - 02/21/08 07:05 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Theo Gallus]
Bruce Condello Offline
Moderator
Ambassador
Field Correspondent

Lunker

Registered: 08/01/04
Posts: 8854
Loc: United States
No other fish strikes as much fear in the heart of biologists as white perch and yellow bass. Unlike other invasives, they are highly reproductive, and seem to find their way into waterways quite effectively. I'd never consider stocking one or the other without consulting the local biologists. These fish can be very bad news.
_________________________
Holding a redear sunfish is like running with scissors.

Top
#109005 - 02/22/08 09:32 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Bruce Condello]
Gambusia Offline
Lunker

Registered: 12/06/04
Posts: 315
Loc: Western North Carolina
Here in NC white perch have decimated white bass fisheries.

White perch are native to the coastal rivers but they have found their way into lakes and the white bass suffer.

If yellow bass stunt like white perch, all they are good for is flathead catfish food.




Edited by Gambusia (02/22/08 09:33 PM)

Top
#109268 - 02/24/08 09:08 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Gambusia]
ericdc Offline
Lunker

Registered: 10/22/07
Posts: 328
Loc: Louisiana, USA
I'd take "slabs" (white perch) over White Bass anyday...especially when it comes to dropping filets in hot grease.

Top
#109273 - 02/24/08 09:12 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: ericdc]
Bruce Condello Offline
Moderator
Ambassador
Field Correspondent

Lunker

Registered: 08/01/04
Posts: 8854
Loc: United States
How big are those slabs, Eric?

I've eaten them too, and they're really good in hot grease I agree. Our only problem is that they end up as a population of hundreds of millions of four inch fish. Not very good for eating. \:\(
_________________________
Holding a redear sunfish is like running with scissors.

Top
#109275 - 02/24/08 09:15 PM Re: Yellow bass [Re: Bruce Condello]
ericdc Offline
Lunker

Registered: 10/22/07
Posts: 328
Loc: Louisiana, USA
The ones I've been catching average well over 10 inches. I have only caught 1 white crappie under 5 inches in the pond so far. Sunk some more trees today in hopes of attracting more "slabs"...they didn't bite today...which was strange since they were biting real good yesterday. Oh well maybe next time!

Top

Today's Birthdays
docoman, Pharmerskip
Recent Posts
Copper Sulfate Buildup!!
by ewest
over night fish kills
by DannyMac
Half acre pond
by jpws
Mudcat Problem
by ShortCut
My early Father's Day present
by Mike Whatley
Spillway barrier to stop losing fish?
by Mike Whatley
Two ponds, two problems. Southern MO
by Quarter Acre
09:08 AM
Tilapia Stocking
by Cody Sandhoff
12:13 AM
Reducing Nutrient Levels in Small Pond with Plants
by Mike Whatley
10:09 PM
Welcome to Pond Boss
by Joey Quarry
10:09 PM
Newly Uploaded Images
Releasing a quick snack
Tadpoles
Biofilm Need Help
The fish are biting again
Electrofishing survey
Help with defuser placement

2014 POND BOSS INC. all rights reserved USA and Worldwide